WAMC | Northeast Public Radio

You're Fully Vaccinated! But Do You Need A Booster Shot?

It's been six months since the first COVID-19 vaccine was administered in the U.S. and now almost 40% of the country's population is fully vaccinated. After more than a year of lockdown measures and quarantines, people are ready to get back to some sense of normal. With their vaccination cards in hand, they're ready to start traveling, go on vacations and see friends and family. But how long that normalcy will be sustained depends on how long the vaccines offer protection from the coronavirus...

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A Remote Work Revolution Is Underway — But Not For Everyone

Last month, Ford announced it would allow staff who have been working remotely to remain remote — at least some of the time — long after the pandemic is over. "Must be nice for them," thought Marcie Pedraza, an electrician at a Ford plant in Chicago. Like many workers across the U.S., from factories to grocery stores, working from home has never been an option for her. And that presents a challenge for companies frantically rewriting their remote work policies: How do you make the change feel...

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It's been six months since the first COVID-19 vaccine was administered in the U.S. and now almost 40% of the country's population is fully vaccinated.

After more than a year of lockdown measures and quarantines, people are ready to get back to some sense of normal. With their vaccination cards in hand, they're ready to start traveling, go on vacations and see friends and family.

But how long that normalcy will be sustained depends on how long the vaccines offer protection from the coronavirus, and if people will need to receive booster shots in the future.

Burlington High School, Burlington, Vermont
Pat Bradley/WAMC

The Burlington, Vermont school board decided this week to stop a multi-million dollar renovation project and not reopen the high school facility.  Last year potentially cancer causing PCB’s were discovered in the buildings and grounds and the superintendent and school officials recommended the board now change course and build a new high school.

Daquetta Jones speaks outside Troy Police headquarters on Thursday
Lucas Willard / WAMC

Police reform advocates rallied outside of Troy police headquarters against a proposal before the city council that would transfer funding to hire six new officers.

Last month, Ford announced it would allow staff who have been working remotely to remain remote — at least some of the time — long after the pandemic is over.

"Must be nice for them," thought Marcie Pedraza, an electrician at a Ford plant in Chicago. Like many workers across the U.S., from factories to grocery stores, working from home has never been an option for her. And that presents a challenge for companies frantically rewriting their remote work policies: How do you make the change feel fair, when not all employees can benefit?

WAMC photo by Dave Lucas

New York officials and consumer activists say it should be easier for the average person and small business to repair certain electronics.

AILSA CHANG, HOST:

During the pandemic, a new divide has emerged between those who have to show up to work and those who can log in to Zoom. Now, companies are looking ahead to life after the pandemic. And as NPR's Camila Domonoske reports, this split may be here to stay.

CAMILA DOMONOSKE, BYLINE: Before the pandemic, nearly all American workers commuted. By luxury car or jalopy, by bicycle or bus to a factory or an office or a studio, the vast majority of us had to physically show up for work. Then came the pandemic.

Cars begin lining up outside the Goodwill donation center in Seabrook, N.H., around 10 a.m. most mornings.

Well-intended patrons are here with truckloads full of treasures.

"We hope everyone brings great things that help our programs, but we know some people make some questionable judgments about what is good to donate," explains Heather Steeves, spokesperson for the 30 Goodwill locations in New Hampshire, Maine and Vermont.

She holds up "a lampshade, which is stained and disgusting and literally falling apart."

AILSA CHANG, HOST:

During the pandemic, a new divide has emerged between those who have to show up to work and those who can log in to Zoom. Now, companies are looking ahead to life after the pandemic. And as NPR's Camila Domonoske reports, this split may be here to stay.

CAMILA DOMONOSKE, BYLINE: Before the pandemic, nearly all American workers commuted. By luxury car or jalopy, by bicycle or bus to a factory or an office or a studio, the vast majority of us had to physically show up for work. Then came the pandemic.

Four ballots - one pink, one blue, one green, and one purple - are attached to a wall.
Josh Landes / WAMC

Berkshire County’s municipal election season is kicking into full swing this month.

Sheldon Silver
WAMC file photo

Former New York Assembly Speaker Sheldon Silver will be returned to federal prison after federal authorities denied him home confinement, a person familiar with the matter told The Associated Press.

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