Russia Moves To Mask Military Trail By Telling Troops To Put Down Smartphones

In an age of information warfare , Russia is going back to basics in a bid to protect its secret information from prying eyes, by telling troops to step away from their smartphones and social media. On Tuesday, Russia's lower house of parliament passed a bill banning military personnel from posting about themselves or colleagues online. The measure also restricts the general use of smartphones. ~~~~~https%3A%2F%2Ftwitter.com%2Fstate_duma%2Fstatus%2F1097874465818636288~~~~~~ Russia's upper...

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Boko Haram Will Never Break Them: Photographing Nigeria's Schoolgirls

In April of 2014, Boko Haram kidnapped more than 276 girls who were attending schools in the northeastern region of Chibok, Nigeria. The incident drew international attention to the students' plight and the extremist terrorist group that claimed responsibility for the kidnappings. Photographer Rahima Gambo wanted to know why students were still going to school in the region despite the ongoing possibility of other dangerous attacks from Boko Haram. This sequence of six directed images show...

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House Democrats plan to file a resolution Friday seeking to block President Trump's emergency declaration aimed at securing funds for building a border wall.

The "resolution of disapproval," led by Rep. Joaquin Castro, D-Texas, received the backing of House Speaker Nancy Pelosi in a letter Wednesday to lawmakers in both parties.

Gains have been made for women and people of color who work in movies and TV, but the numbers remain a long way from proportionately reflecting the U.S. population, according to a new study from UCLA.

The annual Hollywood Diversity Report looks at diversity both in front of and behind the camera. It also looks at box office and ratings.

The report states that evidence continues to suggest "America's increasingly diverse audiences prefer diverse film and television content," and that "diversity is essential for Hollywood's bottom line."

In the days after Superstorm Sandy soaked the East Coast, New York City Department of Transportation workers cataloged the damage to the agency's fleet of vehicles. That information was handed over to the Federal Emergency Management Agency, which would give the city enough money to replace the damaged vehicles with new ones.

Only one problem: Many of those vehicles were damaged before Sandy hit. Some hadn't been operational in years, and had been marked for salvage long before the storm.

NASA

Artificial intelligence is no longer a theory or a science fiction plot. It is all around us and most of us use it every day.

Today on the Best of Our Knowledge, we’ll hear about a new national commission on artificial intelligence, and how ethical questions about its use start and end with us, the humans.

Then we’ll talk to a film maker who, in her latest project, travels around the world listening to people’s stories about climate change. You can watch those films HERE.

Virginia Gov. Ralph Northam has decided not to launch his "reconciliation tour" as planned on Thursday morning at Virginia Union University.

The change comes days after the student government president of the historically black university urged the embattled Democratic governor to come another time.

Keep Burlington Telecom Local supporter holding sign
Pat Bradley/WAMC

Vermont regulators have approved the proposed $30.8 million sale of municipal telecommunications company Burlington Telecom.

Updated at 9:20 p.m. ET

President Trump's former lawyer and fixer, Michael Cohen, is set to appear on Capitol Hill next week to give highly anticipated testimony before the House Oversight and Government Reform Committee.

The hearing was originally scheduled for earlier in the month but was delayed after Cohen cited "threats" from the president and attorney Rudy Giuliani.

Is it an innocent display of jubilation over a war's end or an unacceptable act of sexual aggression?

The context of a kiss is clashing with an evolving emphasis on consent in the #MeToo era.

In April of 2014, Boko Haram kidnapped more than 276 girls who were attending schools in the northeastern region of Chibok, Nigeria. The incident drew international attention to the students' plight and the extremist terrorist group that claimed responsibility for the kidnappings. Photographer Rahima Gambo wanted to know why students were still going to school in the region despite the ongoing possibility of other dangerous attacks from Boko Haram.

Copyright 2019 NPR. To see more, visit https://www.npr.org.

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