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Biden Calls On 'Handful' Of Republicans To Hold Off On Supreme Court Nominee

Democratic presidential nominee Joe Biden on Sunday delivered uncompromising remarks, calling for Republicans to hold off on considering a Supreme Court nominee from President Trump until after the Nov. 3 general election. Biden urged Republican lawmakers to respect the late Justice Ruth Bader Ginsburg's dying wish that she "not be replaced until a new president is installed." "As a nation, we should heed her final call to us," Biden said in campaign remarks in Philadelphia. "To jam this...

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Cory Booker: GOP Should 'Honor Their Word' On Court Vacancy

Tributes and remembrances have poured in from across the country following the death of Supreme Court Justice Ruth Bader Ginsburg on Friday night. So too have stark calls and concerns over the potential timeline for choosing her successor. Democratic Sen. Cory Booker, D.-N.J., who sits on the judiciary committee, told NPR on Sunday that he believes lawmakers should let the winner of November's presidential election select a nominee. "Voting has started in a number of states and I really do...

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As firefighters work to contain dozens of wildfires raging across California and other western states, the Bobcat Fire is approaching nearly 100,000 acres, making it one of Los Angeles County's largest-ever blazes.

Justice Ruth Bader Ginsburg's chair on the U.S. Supreme Court bench and the bench directly in front of it have been draped with black wool crepe in memoriam.

In addition, a black drape has been hung over the courtroom doors. According to the Supreme Court, this tradition dates back at least as far as the death of Chief Justice Salmon P. Chase in 1873. It is believed to have been followed since, after the death of each sitting justice.

The court has also announced that the flags on the Supreme Court's front plaza will be flown at half-staff for 30 days.

With President Trump soon to nominate a replacement for Justice Ruth Bader Ginsburg on the Supreme Court, some Democrats are returning to an idea that hasn't been seriously proposed since the days of Franklin D. Roosevelt: increasing the number of justices on the Supreme Court.

(Airs 09/20/20 @ 6 p.m. & 09/21/20 @ 3 p.m.) The Media Project is an inside look at media coverage of current events with WAMC’s CEO Alan Chartock, Times Union Editor-at-Large Rex Smith, Rosemary Armao, Editor and Investigative Journalist and Professor at the University at Albany, and Barbara Lombardo, Journalism Professor at the University at Albany and former Executive Editor of The Saratogian and The (Troy) Record. On this week’s Media Project Alan, Rex, Rosemary, and Barbara talk about whether newspapers should continue to endorse political candidates, how to cover a President who is a threat to democracy, and much more.

MICHEL MARTIN, HOST:

September is when newspapers and magazines would usually publish their fall theater previews. But this year, there's no fall season - at least not in any traditional sense. So what is theater going to look like when the pandemic is over? Reporter Jeff Lunden spoke with three people in a position to re-imagine the future of theater.

(SOUNDBITE OF ARCHIVED RECORDING)

JEFF LUNDEN, BYLINE: Oskar Eustis, artistic director of New York's Public Theater, knows firsthand about the coronavirus.

Tributes and remembrances have poured in from across the country following the death of Supreme Court Justice Ruth Bader Ginsburg on Friday night.

Oskar Eustis, artistic director of The Public Theater in New York, knows firsthand about the coronavirus. Eustis was hospitalized with COVID on March 10, and by the time he was released five days later, everything was shut down. "I came out into a world that had no theater, and it's a different world," he says.

MICHEL MARTIN, HOST:

September is when newspapers and magazines would usually publish their fall theater previews. But this year, there's no fall season - at least not in any traditional sense. So what is theater going to look like when the pandemic is over? Reporter Jeff Lunden spoke with three people in a position to re-imagine the future of theater.

(SOUNDBITE OF ARCHIVED RECORDING)

JEFF LUNDEN, BYLINE: Oskar Eustis, artistic director of New York's Public Theater, knows firsthand about the coronavirus.

In February 1965, two of America's most towering public intellectuals faced off at the University of Cambridge in England. They were there to debate the proposition: "The American Dream is at the expense of the American Negro."

Novelist and essayist James Baldwin argued in favor. He did so by pointing to the experience of the Black man in America. He said the legacy of slavery and white supremacy had in effect "destroy[ed] his sense of reality." Black fathers have no authority over their sons, Baldwin said, because a Black boy's "father has no power in the world."

Democratic presidential nominee Joe Biden on Sunday delivered uncompromising remarks, calling for Republicans to hold off on considering a Supreme Court nominee from President Trump until after the Nov. 3 general election.

Biden urged Republican lawmakers to respect the late Justice Ruth Bader Ginsburg's dying wish that she "not be replaced until a new president is installed."

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WAMC’s Interviews With Gov. Cuomo

WAMC’s Alan Chartock regularly interviews New York Governor Andrew Cuomo about state and national politics, the pandemic, and more.

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