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Strange Universe
Sundays, 9:35 a.m.

Astronomer Bob Berman sheds light on the mysteries of space and time. Always fascinating and fun, Strange Universe will take you places you never knew existed. Learn why Betelgeuse sometimes goes weirdly dim and how after the totality in 2017 in places like Wyoming and the Carolinas, millions finally got to see a total solar eclipse.

  • Strange Universe With Bob Berman
    Statistically, the year’s coldest week is now nearly a month behind us. But it’s still darn cold, which, in this world full of gray areas, reminds us of a single absolute we can count on. That take-it-to-the-bank certainty is absolute zero. Hear what weird things occurred when temperatures drop too low.
  • Strange Universe With Bob Berman
    It’ll soon be Valentine’s Day, so what makes a great romantic gift? A book of poetry? A candlelight dinner? Excellent choices — but as a nightcap, there's nothing like a moonlight or starlit stroll. So if it's a very late date or if you and your beloved wake up just as morning twilight begins and gaze out an east facing window, the Morning Star will be totally, absolutely riveting, although very low. And look at that little orange star next to it — that’s Mars, as if the male and female aspects of the heavens are dancing.
  • Strange Universe With Bob Berman
    Radiation penetrates our bodies 24/7. Most is natural, with background cosmic ray doses proportional to your home’s elevation. These broken pieces of atoms zooming in from space, give you 30 millirems of annual radiation if you live near sea level, like in L.A. But you get much more if your home is up high. People in Denver get 80 millirems yearly.
  • Strange Universe With Bob Berman
    Do you still keep your old binoculars in the same drawer as your socks? And are you psyched to glimpse the green planet Uranus?
  • Strange Universe With Bob Berman
    According to the U.N., most of us live in cites rather than rural regions. The switchover arrived in 2007. Which brings up the rural night’s main illumination – the Moon. We now know that lunar brightness doubles 2.5 days before Full Moon, which is a big deal if you need a little extra light to complete outdoor rural work. After all, a Half Moon is only a tenth as bright as a Full Moon, not enough to be fully useful.
  • Strange Universe With Bob Berman
    Saturn wins the Miss Universe contest. For anyone who's ever seen it through a telescope, there are hardly any runners-up. Saturn’s just a knockout, and even 60 power is plenty to show it well. Tune in for the best time to see the planet in action.
  • Strange Universe With Bob Berman
    This will be a great year in the night sky, one of the best of our lives. So get ready to scrawl some stuff on your calendar. Tune in to hear what and when you can catch the biggest sky events of the year, including a very close conjunction between two of our favorite planets.
  • Strange Universe With Bob Berman
    Orion and its famous belt points down to the brightest star, Sirius. Being the most brilliant object in the Big Dog constellation it’s naturally called the Dog Star, and by amazing coincidence it hovers at its highest, perfectly due south, at exactly midnight on each New Year’s Eve. Hear how to catch the two brightest stars in the sky.
  • Strange Universe With Bob Berman
    A supernova is the biggest explosion that ever lights up the modern universe, and happens around once a century in each of the hundreds of billions of galaxies in the cosmos. Tune in to hear about the sun and if it can go "supernova."
  • Strange Universe With Bob Berman
    All this week we’re viewing crescent moons that grow fatter each evening. The crescent may be the Moon’s most fascinating phase.