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Joe Donahue

Senior Director of News and Programming

Joe talks to people on the radio for a living. In addition to countless impressive human "gets" - he has talked to a lot of Muppets. Joe grew up in Philadelphia, has been on the area airwaves for more than 25 years and currently lives in Washington County, NY with his wife, Kelly, and their dog, Brady. And yes, he reads every single book. 

  • In her new book "There Is Nothing for You Here: Finding Opportunity in the Twenty-First Century," Fiona Hill reveals how declining opportunity has set America on the grim path of modern Russia and draws on her personal journey out of poverty, as well as her unique perspectives as an historian and policy maker, to show how we can return hope to our forgotten places.Fiona Hill is the Robert Bosch Senior Fellow at the Center on the United States and Europe in the Foreign Policy program at the Brookings Institution. From 2017 to 2019, she served as deputy assistant to the president and senior director for European and Russian affairs on the National Security Council.
  • The Roundtable Panel: a daily open discussion of issues in the news and beyond.Today's panelists are WAMC’s Alan Chartock, research professor and Stuart Rice Honorary Chair at the University of Massachusetts Amherst’s College of Information and Computer Sciences (CICS) and Faculty Associate at the Berkman Klein Center for Internet and Society at Harvard University Fran Berman, Former EPA Regional Administrator, Visiting Professor at Bennington College, and President of Beyond Plastics Judith Enck, and Lecturer and Adjunct Professor in Communications for SUNY New Paltz and RPI Terry Gipson.
  • Today's panelists are WAMC’s Alan Chartock, Cohoes City Director of Operations Theresa Bourgeois, Siena College Professor of Comparative Politics Vera Eccarius-Kelly, and corporate attorney with Phillips Lytle LLP Rich Honen.
  • For more than two centuries, historians have debated the history of the American Revolution, disputing its roots, its provenance, and above all, its meaning. These questions have intrigued Joseph J. Ellis throughout his entire career. With "The Cause: The American Revolution and its Discontents, 1773-1783," he brings the story of the revolution to vivid life. Completing a trilogy of books that began with "Founding Brothers," "The Cause" returns us to the very heart of the American founding, telling the military and political story of the war for independence from the ground up, and from all sides: British and American, loyalist and patriot, white and Black.
  • This year's Adirondack Film Festival takes place October 14-17.
  • In his new book "Capote’s Women: A True Story of Love, Betrayal, and a Swan Song," Laurence Leamer reveals the complex web of relationships and scandalous true stories behind Truman Capote’s never-published final novel, Answered Prayers—the dark secrets, tragic glamour, and Capote’s ultimate betrayal of the group of female friends he called his "swans."
  • The Roundtable Panel: a daily open discussion of issues in the news and beyond.Today's panelists are WAMC’s Alan Chartock, investigative journalist and UAlbany Adjunct Professor Rosemary Armao, Dean of the College of Emergency Preparedness, Homeland Cybersecurity at the University at Albany Robert Griffin, and Associate Director of Assessment at UMASS Amherst Dr. Alicia Remaly.
  • Thirty years ago, Anita Hill faced down an all-male, all-white Senate Judiciary Committee, led by then-Senator Joe Biden, to testify that her boss, Supreme Court Justice nominee Clarence Thomas, had sexually harassed her. Her new book is: "Believing: Our Thirty-Year Journey to End Gender Violence."
  • Sessions, workshops, talks, readings and more will headline the Saratoga Book Festival, taking place this coming weekend at various locations in Saratoga Springs.
  • In the new book, "The Black President," Historian Claude Clegg situates the former president in a dynamic, inspirational, yet contentious political context. Clegg captures the America that made Obama's White House years possible, while insightfully rendering the America that resolutely resisted the idea of a Black chief executive, thus making conceivable the ascent of the most unlikely of his successors.