illustration

Sandra Boynton is a beloved American cartoonist, children’s author, songwriter, and highly sporadic short film director. Boynton has written and illustrated sixty children’s books and seven general audience books, including five New York Times best-sellers.

Her newest board book is "Dinosnores" and she came to the studio to speak with us about the book, her music, why she's a cartoonist who has chosen to never have a comic-strip - and more.

Dr. Seuss fans are in for a treat this week with the publication of “Dr. Seuss’s Horse Museum,” a new book based on a manuscript and sketches created by Theodor “Seuss” Geisel and discovered in the author’s home 21 years after his death. In the story, a lovable horse takes a group of students on a guided tour of the horse museum. It is an exploration of all types of art and the way artists depict horses.

There will be a Book Release Party on Saturday, September 7 at the Amazing World of Dr. Seuss Museum in Springfield, Massachusetts.

This latest Seuss treasure, illustrated by acclaimed illustrator, Andrew Joyner, is a unique and playful celebration of art and how we all see the world in different ways.

Andrew Joyner is the illustrator and author of numerous children's books, including "The Pink Hat" and the "Boris" chapter book series, about a winsome and adventurous warthog.

"The Picture Book Odysseys of Peter Sís" is on display at The Eric Carle Museum of Picture Book Art in Amherst, Massachusetts. It showcases more than 90 original illustrations from 26 picture books, ranging from Sís’s exquisitely detailed paintings of historical narratives to the bold graphics of his early readers. A selection of painted objects and public art projects showcase other facets of his award-winning career.

Born in Czechoslovakia, Peter Sís transports readers to the ancient city of Prague in "The Three Golden Keys" and explores its political past in "The Wall: Growing Up Behind the Iron Curtain." He chronicles his father’s two-year odyssey in the Himalaya Mountains in "Tibet Through the Red Box," and creates a modern-day fairytale in "Madlenka."

Renowned illustrator Gregory Manchess has created a lavishly painted novel about the son of a famed polar explorer searching for his stranded father, and a lost city buried under snow in an alternate future.

In "Above the Timberline," when it started to snow, it didn’t stop for 1,500 years. The Pole Shift that ancient climatologists talked about finally came, the topography was ripped apart and the weather of the world was changed—forever. Now the Earth is covered in snow, and to unknown depths in some places.

Original artworks from the book are currently on view at the Norman Rockwell Museum in Stockbridge, MA through February 24th. Manchess has worked as a freelance illustrator for nearly forty years on advertising campaigns, magazines, and book covers.

Liza Donnelly is a cartoonist and writer with The New Yorker Magazine, and resident cartoonist at CBS News. Her work has been exhibited around the world. 

Donnelly is a Cultural Envoy for the US State Department, traveling around the world speaking about freedom of speech, cartoons and women’s rights.  She is the author/editor of sixteen books and was a finalist for the Thurber Prize for American Humor.  She wrote the critically acclaimed history, "Funny Ladies: The New Yorker’s Greatest Women Cartoonists and Their Cartoons."

Her latest book is for dog owners and lovers everywhere. C. J. Frick's book: "Be the Person Your Dog Thinks You Are" is a humorous, fully illustrated book – by Donnelly - that shows us that even when we feel at our worst, our dogs still think we’re the best. 

Thomas Cathcart and Daniel Klein have been thinking deep thoughts and writing jokes for decades, and now they are here to help us understand Philosophy through cartoons, and cartoons through Philosophy. Covering topics as diverse as religion, gender, knowledge, morality, and the meaning of life (or the lack thereof), their new book is: "I Think, Therefore I Draw."

Daniel Klein and Thomas Cathcart studied philosophy together at Harvard in the last millennium. Danny has written comedy for Lily Tomlin, Flip Wilson, and others, and published scores of fiction and non-fiction books. Tom studied theology and managed health care organizations before linking up with Danny to write "Plato and a Platypus Walk into a Bar," "Aristotle and an Aardvark Go to Washington," and "Heidegger and a Hippo Walk through Those Pearly Gates."

The Norman Rockwell Museum is currently presenting "Never Abandon Imagination: The Fantastical Art of Tony DiTerlizzi," an exhibition of works by the acclaimed illustrator/writer that will be on view at the Museum through May 28. Known for his successful book series "The Spiderwick Chronicles," DiTerlizzi is widely celebrated for his images of such fantasy creatures as fairies, trolls, sprites, and goblins.

"Never Abandon Imagination," which has been organized by Norman Rockwell Museum, showcases over 150 original paintings and drawings, from the games "Dungeons & Dragons" and "Magic: The Gathering," to his many fantasy and children’s books, in addition to artworks from his childhood and college years. The exhibition highlights the artist’s influences and artistic process.

Tony DiTerlizzi and Curator of Exhibitions at Norman Rockwell Museum Jesse Kowalski join us.

Roz Chast has published more than a thousand cartoons in The New Yorker since 1978. Her frantic and disheveled characters have become icons of American humor. Her new book is "Going Into Town: A Love Letter to New York" – a graphic ode/guide/thank-you note to Manhattan.

Barry Blitt’s cartoons have been lampooning American politics and culture for decades. His iconic New Yorker covers are defining images for our times, earning him adoration from critics and fans and piles of hate mail from everyone else.

The book, "Blitt" shares his private sketchbooks, drafts, and uproarious rejected illustrations, offering readers an illuminating view into his creative process and features the author's hand-scrawled annotations and self-deprecating witticisms, more than one hundred never-before-seen sketches and drafts, and essays from Blitt’s collaborators and peers, including Frank Rich, Françoise Mouly, and Steve Brodner. 

Uncle Andy Paints a Soup Can 2003 Illustration for Uncle Andy’s: A Faabbbulous Visit with Andy Warhol by James Warhola, Picture Puffin Books Watercolor and pencil on paper Collection of the artist
James Warhola

Inventing America: Rockwell and Warhol is the first exhibition linking Norman Rockwell and Andy Warhol, two iconic visual communicators who embraced populism, shaped national identity, and opened new ways of seeing in twentieth century America.

Original iconic artworks; process materials and studies; archival photography, manuscripts, and documents; film/video footage; and props, costumes, and personal artifacts are all on view at the Norman Rockwell Museum in Stockbridge, MA.

And there is also the special compendium exhibition by Warhol’s nephew: James Warhola: Uncle Andy And Other Stories. Both exhibits are on display through October 29th. James Warhola is with us this morning along with curators Stephanie Plunkett and Jesse Kowalski.

Orli Auslander grew up in London and worked as a milliner and radio DJ in New York City before devoting herself full-time to creating art. Her work has been shown in the US, England and Spain, and was recently featured on the Showtime series Happyish.

Her new book, I Feel Bad: All Day. Every Day. About Everything., is a series of 100 illustrations with accompanying text. She captures a mood and emotional ambivalence that will be all too familiar for readers: trying to be the best wife, mother, and friend she can be, while simultaneously feeling badly about virtually everything she does. 

Orli Auslander will have a book party at The Golden Notebook in Woodstock, NY this Friday at 6 p.m. 

In Some Writer! Melissa Sweet mixes White’s personal letters, photos, and family ephemera with her own exquisite artwork to tell his story, from his birth in 1899 to his death in 1985. The book is an authorized tribute and is the first fully illustrated biography of E. B. White.

Melissa Sweet is the Caldecott Honor-winning illustrator of many fine children's books including Balloons Over Broadway, a Sibert winner, and The Right Word and A River of Words, both Caldecott Honors.

  Tomorrow at 8pm, film composer and singer-songwriter Peter Salett and illustrator Michael Arthur will be at MASS MoCA in North Adams to perform Suite for the Summer Rain and Dance of the Yellow Leaf --two related song-cycles that will be accentuated and elevated through a collaboration of the artists that melds the live music performance with live illustration projected behind the band.

Robyn Phillips-Pendleton
University of Delaware

The Norman Rockwell Museum is hosting a talk Thursday on how illustrations have impacted perceptions of race throughout history. University of Delaware Professor of Visual Communication Robyn Phillips-Pendleton will deliver the lecture at 5:30 in the Stockbridge museum.

  In the summer of 1925, The New Yorker was struggling to survive its first year in print. They took a chance on a young cartoonist who was about to give up his career as an artist. His name was Peter Arno, and his witty social commentary, blush-inducing content, and compositional mastery brought a cosmopolitan edge to the magazine’s pages—a vitality that would soon cement The New Yorker as one of the world’s most celebrated publications.

Alongside New Yorker luminaries such as E.B. White, James Thurber, and founding editor Harold Ross, Arno is one of the select few who made the magazine the cultural touchstone it is today.

In his new biography of one of The New Yorker’s first geniuses, New Yorker cartoonist Michael Maslin dives into Arno’s rocky relationship with the magazine, his fiery marriage to the columnist Lois Long, and his tabloid-cover altercations involving pistols, fists, and barely-legal debutantes.

Michael Maslin’s cartoons have been appearing in The New Yorker for nearly forty years. He is the author or coauthor of eight books of cartoons. His new biography is: Peter Arno: The Mad, Mad World of The New Yorker's Greatest Cartoonist.

  Robots are perennial kid-favorites. In his new series, acclaimed illustrator Marc Rosenthal’s vividly colored, retro-futuristic robots encourage kids age 2 to 5 to lift the flaps and learn all about basic concepts.

Big Bot, Small Bot invites young readers to play with robots who demonstrate opposites such as “quiet” and “loud,” “front” and “back,” and “full” and “empty.” Each illustration is presented with a gatefold that, when lifted, transforms the image into its opposite!

One Robot Lost His Head follows the travails of a slightly clumsy robot who can't quite keep track of his own head, and the smart robot pals who help him find it. A gatefold on each spread opens to reveal a visual punch line that teaches kids basic number skills while making them laugh.

Marc’s illustrations can be seen regularly in The New Yorker, Time, Forbes, Fortune, The Atlantic Monthly, The New York Times, Boston Globe, and The Washington Post.

  The Hyde Collection in Glens Falls, NY opened two new exhibitions this month, Norman Rockwell in the 1960s, and 60 from the 60s: Selections from the George Eastman Museum.

The Rockwell show features 21 illustrations and original magazine covers by Rockwell, the Eastman show features photographs – both explore the turbulent decade that marked the generational changes in America during the 1960s.

Erin Coe is the Director of The Hyde Collection.

In southeast England there exists a 6,000 acre tract of land that is among the most beloved (and protected) on earth - the Ashdown Forest, inspiration for the hundreds of illustrations published in the original Winnie-the-Pooh books. And yet, as certain as readers are of the look of the Hundred Acre Woods, few have known that there is a real place that provided the origin for E.H. Shepherd’s iconographic drawings.

On Thursday, November 19th, landscape designer and author, Kathryn Aalto, will be sharing her photos of Ashdown Forest along with her “map” of Pooh’s world. Aalto will be at The Spotty Dog Books & Ale in Hudson at 7:00pm. A portion of book sales will benefit the Campaign for the New Hudson Area Library

Aalto is a writer, designer, historian and lecturer who lives in Exeter, England. For the past twenty-five years, her focus has been on places where nature and culture intersect. Here newest book is The Natural World of Winnie-the-Pooh: Exploring the Real Landscapes of the Hundred Acre Wood

  In 2008, Brian Selznick’s groundbreaking book The Invention of Hugo Cabret was awarded the Caldecott Medal. It was nominated for a National Book Award and was the basis for Martin Scorsese's Oscar winning film Hugo.

His follow up illustrated novel, Wonderstruck, debuted at #1 on the New York Times bestseller list. His newest illustrated novel is The Marvels where two seemingly unrelated stories - one in words, the other in pictures - come together. 

  Award-winning author Brian Selznick will be at The Mahaiwe in Great Barrington, MA on Sunday at 3pm for a special multi-media presentation talk, Q&A, and signing event with his newest illustrated novel, The Marvels.

In 2008, Selznick’s groundbreaking book The Invention of Hugo Cabret was awarded the Caldecott Medal. It was nominated for a National Book Award and was the basis for Martin Scorsese's Oscar winning film Hugo. His follow up illustrated novel, Wonderstruck, debuted at #1 on the New York Times bestseller list.

  Graphic novel author, Marika McCoola joins us this morning to tell us about her debut, Baba Yaga’s Assistant.

In the book - Russian folklore icon Baba Yaga mentors a lonely teen in a wry graphic novel that balances between the modern and the timeless. Emily Carroll is the graphic artist for the book.

Marika McCoola has an MFA in writing for children from Simmons College and is the former children’s department director at the Odyssey Bookshop, where there will be a book launch party tomorrow at 6PM.

  The Sendak Fellowship is a residency program that supports artists who tell stories with illustration. The Fellowship offers a four-week summer retreat for several artists to live and work at Scotch Hill Farm in Cambridge, New York.

The goal of the Sendak Fellowship, in Maurice’s words, was for the Fellows to “create work that is not vapid, stupid, or sexy, but original. Work that excites and incites. Illustration is like dance; it should move like—and to—music.” The Sendak Fellowship was inaugurated in 2010.

  The Clark Art Institute's collection includes around 300 teacups from different eras and continents. Artist Molly Hatch gained access to the pieces and her collected illustrations of them are gathered in the new book, A Teacup Collection: Paintings of Porcelain Treasures.

The Clark will celebrate the book beginning at 1:30pm this Sunday – with a tea in their Café Seven, an author’s talk at 3pm in The Clark Center, and a book signing in the Museum Store at 4pm.

Molly Hatch joins us now to tell us more and she is joined by Kathleen M. Morris, the Sylvia and Leonard Marx Director of Collections and Exhibitions and Curator of Decorative Arts. She worked with Molly on the book and wrote the forward.

  Many noted American modernists have successfully traversed the worlds of fine art and illustration, embracing innovation while satisfying in unique and personal ways the needs and wants of a broad popular audience.

The Unknown Hopper: Edward Hopper as Illustrator is currently on display at The Norman Rockwell Museum in Stockbridge, MA through October 26th. The exhibition presents a unique and comprehensive study of the little-known twenty year illustration career of the realist master.

 

 Launched on July 1, 1916, the Battle of the Somme has come to epitomize the madness of the First World War. Almost 20,000 British soldiers were killed and another 40,000 were wounded that first day, and there were more than one million casualties by the time the offensive halted.

In The Great War, acclaimed cartoon journalist Joe Sacco depicts the events of that day in an extraordinary, 24-foot long panorama: from General Douglas Haig and the massive artillery positions behind the trench lines to the legions of soldiers going “over the top” and getting cut down in no-man’s-land, to the tens of thousands of wounded soldiers retreating and the dead being buried en masse.

Printed on fine accordion-fold paper and packaged in a slipcase with a 16-page booklet, The Great War is a landmark in Sacco’s illustrious career and allows us to see the War to End All Wars as we’ve never seen it before.

    Seriously Silly: a Decade of Art & Whimsy by Mo Willems marks 10 years of the artist creating picture books. The show, at The Eric Carle Museum of Picture Book Art, surveys the full range of his prolific output from the award-winning Knuffle Bunny series to Elephant and Piggie. 

Mo began his career as a writer and animator for television, garnering six Emmy Awards for his writing on Sesame Street, creating Nickelodeon's The Off-Beats, Cartoon Network’s Sheep in the Big City and head-writing Codename: Kids Next Door.

Often called “the Dr. Seuss of his generation,” Mo is among the most popular book author / illustrators of all time. He is a New York Times #1 Best Selling author and illustrator, and his work has garnered 3 Caldecott Honors, 2 Theodor (Seuss) Geisel Medals, 2 Carnegie Medals, and a Geisel Honor.

The R. Michelson Galleries also have a show of Mo's work, entitled Don't Pigeonhole Me!

Demetri Martin / Point Your Face at This: Drawings published by Grand Central

  Stand-up comedian, Demetri Martin, brings his “Point Your Face at this Tour” to The Calvin in Northampton, MA tonight. (He will also be at The Egg in Albany on Saturday - but that show is sold out.) 

Demetri Martin has appeared on Comedy Central Presents, has two one-hour Comedy Central stand-up specials, he was the Trendspotting/Youth Correspondent on The Daily Show, a writer on Late Night with Conan O’Brien, had a Comedy Central Series entitled Important Things with Demetri Martin, appeared on HBO’s Flight of the Conchords (which I mention because it is a personal favorite), and starred in Ang Lee’s film, Taking Woodstock.

Next Tuesday, Demetri’s new book, Point Your Face at This: Drawings, will be available - it is published by Grand Central and is available for pre-order now. The book is a new collection of Demetri’s drawings - single panel, single page line drawings like the one’s he presents on a large pad of paper during many of his stand-up shows.

    After the loss of his wife in a tragic accident, artist Danny Gregory chronicled his grief in the medium he knows best—the pages of his illustrated journals. His new book, A Kiss Before You Go: An Illustrated Memoir of Love and Loss, reproduces these journal pages in a visual memoir of Gregory's journey towards recovery.

Gregory's process reminds us that creative expression offers its own therapy, and that living each day to its fullest may be as simple as putting pen to paper. Anyone who has experienced loss will take solace in this candid look at grieving.

New York Times-bestselling author and illustrator Brian Selznick will talk about his Caldecott Award-winning book, The Invention of Hugo Cabret and how it became Martin Scorsese's 2011 Oscar-winning film Hugo on Sunday at The Mahaiwe Theatre in Great Barrington.

Following a screening of the film, Selznick will participate in a Q & A with his Scholastic editor, Berkshire resident Tracy Mack, and then sign books.

MA Trooper in Rockwell Work Dies at 83

May 8, 2012

A retired Massachusetts state trooper who was a model for Norman Rockwell's 1958 Saturday Evening Post illustration, "The Runaway," has died.  WAMC’s Tristan O’Neill reports…

Massachusetts State Police said 83-year-old retired Staff Sgt. Richard Clemens Jr. died Sunday after a brief illness.