healthcare

Samuel Harrington, MD, an honors graduate of Harvard College and the University of Wisconsin Medical School, concentrated his clinical practice at Sibley Memorial Hospital in Washington, DC. There he served as a medical staff leader, a trustee, and as Sibley's representative to the Johns Hopkins Quality and Safety Board Committee. This work and his service on the board of trustees of a nonprofit hospice brought Dr. Harrington into the discussion of end-of-life medical care.

Most people say they would like to die quietly at home. But overly aggressive medical advice, coupled with an unrealistic sense of invincibility or overconfidence in our health-care system, results in the majority of elderly patients misguidedly dying in institutions. Many undergo painful procedures instead of having the better and more peaceful death they deserve.

Dr. Harrington's new book "At Peace: Choosing a Good Death After a Long Life" outlines specific active and passive steps that older patients and their health-care proxies can take to ensure loved ones live their last days comfortably at home and/or in hospice when further aggressive care is inappropriate.

Lucas Willard / WAMC

A Capital Region hospital and healthcare network will remain independent after a two-year review.

Christie Watson was a registered nurse for twenty years before writing full time. Her first novel, "Tiny Sunbirds Far Away," won the Costa First Novel Award and her second novel, "Where Women Are Kings," was also published to international critical acclaim.

In "The Language of Kindness: A Nurse's Story," she opens the doors of the hospital and shares its secrets. She takes us by her side down hospital corridors to visit the wards and meet her unforgettable patients.

Our Falling into Place series spotlights the important work of -and fosters collaboration between- not-for-profit organizations in our communities; allowing us all to fall into place.

Falling Into Place is supported by The Seymour Fox Memorial Foundation, Providing a helping hand to turn inspiration into accomplishment. See more possibilities … see more promise… see more progress.

Albany College of Pharmacy and Health Sciences joins us to talk about their new innitiative, “The Collaboratory.”

Located in Albany’s South End, this space will be used by both the College and Trinity Alliance and serve as the home base for the REACH program. The purpose of this program is to engage, empower, and activate Medicaid and Medicaid-eligible residents of the South End and nearby neighborhoods to make consistent use of preventative health care and wellness systems.

Beyond serving this need, the Collaboratory will host classes for both ACPHS students as well as for community residents. The space will also be available for community group meetings, and we expect to add more services in the years to come. Below is list of suggested questions to help guide the discussion.

We welcome ACPHS President, Dr. Greg Dewey and Dr. Colleen McLaughlin. Colleen is a professor at the College and also serves as the Chair of their Department of Population Health Sciences.

In a 2 to 1 vote, nurses at Albany Medical Center have chosen to unionize.

 

The hospital said in a release early Saturday morning that in a secret ballot election conducted by the National Labor Relations Board, Albany Med nurses voted to accept representation by the New York State Nurses Association for purposes of collective bargaining. 

Best-Selling author Barbara Ehrenreich, after her own battle with cancer, is now against the preventative care that is supposed to prolong life and guarantee health. It may sound suicidal, but Ehrenreich claims most of the medical tests she is urged to take fall short of the “evidence based” standard she requires to go to the hospital and undergo unpleasant and intrusive procedures.

In her new book, "Natural Causes: An Epidemic Of Wellness, The Certainty Of Dying, And Our Illusion Of Control," Barbara Ehrenreich tackles the politics of women’s health care, watching average Americans become fierce advocates for pointless diets, unnecessary procedures and checkups, and an unhealthy amount of exercise without the full knowledge of how flimsy the science behind those practices really is. Is control over our bodies even possible?

The feminist icon & author of "Nickel and Dimed" holds a degree in cellular immunology and uses it to great effect as she topples the institutions & customs that guide our attempts at living long, healthy lives.

Even with Congress’s failure to officially repeal the Affordable Care Act, our healthcare system is desperately broken. No proposed reforms have addressed the fact that the cost of medical care in the U.S. has grown far beyond what most people can afford, and pharmaceutical giant CVS’s recent acquisition of Aetna only underscores what Americans have known for years: Our healthcare system is now in the money-making business and not the healing one.

As a Harvard-trained medical doctor and veteran journalist, first with the New York Times and now as editor-in-chief of Kaiser Health News, Dr. Elisabeth Rosenthal has witnessed firsthand how healthcare has become a business. Her new book is: "An American Sickness: How Healthcare Became Big Business and How You Can Take It Back."

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  Our tech guru Jesse Feiler joins us this morning to talk about health tech.

Jesse Feiler is an app developer, author, and consultant specializing in small business and nonprofit organizations. His most recent books are “The Nonprofit Risk Book: Finding and Managing Risk in Nonprofits and NGOs” written with Gail B. Nayowith and “Learn Computer Science with Swift.” His most recent apps are “CyberContinuity,” a free app to learn about your vulnerabilities and “The Nonprofit Risk App,” a companion to the book.

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Last week, the Massachusetts Senate passed an omnibus healthcare reform bill to lower costs, improve patient care, and maintain access to healthcare. One amendment added by State Senator Adam Hinds, a Pittsfield Democrat, was based on pending legislation in the House to help volunteer ambulance services in rural communities. WAMC’s Berkshire Bureau Chief JD Allen spoke with Representative Paul Mark of the 2rd Berkshire state House District, who authored the legislation.

Our Falling into Place series spotlights the important work of -and fosters collaboration between- not-for-profit organizations in our communities; allowing us all to fall into place.

Falling Into Place is supported by The Seymour Fox Memorial FoundationProviding a helping hand to turn inspiration into accomplishment. See more possibilities … see more promise… see more progress.

This morning we focus on the Albany Damien Center which is opening their new 26,000 square foot building at 728 Madison Ave, Albany. They will also have a fundraiser on November 4: Norman Rea Presents A Phoenix Rising A Capital Celebration of the new Damien Center. Perry Junjulas is the Executive Director of The Albany Damien Center.

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The state Senate has concluded a yearlong study to find short and long term policy goals to address rising healthcare costs and consumer protections in Massachusetts. Healthcare makes up 40 percent of the state’s budget. WAMC’s Berkshire Bureau Chief JD Allen spoke with State Senator Adam Hinds, a Pittsfield Democrat, about what he calls a common-sense healthcare reform bill for rural Massachusetts.

Senator Charles Schumer
WAMC Photo

New York U.S. Senator Charles Schumer will be making stops in the region Friday.

Senate Minority Leader Schumer is scheduled to visit Gloversville in Fulton County at 1 p.m. The Democrat is expected to address cuts to federal programs that benefit rural hospitals. Schumer says if Congress does not renew payments through the Low-Volume Hospital and Medicare-Dependent Hospital programs, Nathan Littauer Hospital will lose more than $1 million in federal aid.

Dr. Atul Gawande helped transform the conversation about aging and death in his book, Being Mortal: Medicine and What Matters in the End.

He is a surgeon at Brigham and Women’s Hospital in Boston, a professor at Harvard Medical School, and a staff writer at The New Yorker.

Taking Charge Of Cancer

Aug 28, 2017

Radiation oncologist and cancer researcher, Dr. David Palma joins us to discuss his new book, Taking Charge of Cancer. The book offers an insider’s guide to understanding and receiving the best treatment options, choosing the right medical team, and approaching this difficult time with knowledge and hope. 

Taking Charge of Cancer is a different type of book for cancer patients—one that goes beyond the cancer information that is currently available, allowing you to truly take control of your cancer treatment. You’ll learn how to obtain and understand medical records, and why these records are critical to your care.

  Our Falling into Place series spotlights the important work of -and fosters collaboration between- not-for-profit organizations in our communities; allowing us all to fall into place.

Falling Into Place is supported by The Seymour Fox Memorial Foundation, Providing a helping hand to turn inspiration into accomplishment. See more possibilities … see more promise… see more progress.

This morning we focus on Hixny - fostering collaboration within the healthcare community; a collaboration that would result in the secure, digital exchange of patient data. Bryan Cudmore is a Hixny Vice-President. 

Bill Owens: What Is Next For Healthcare?

Aug 25, 2017

The Republican Senate’s third failed attempt at repeal and/or replace was a surprise to many, including this writer.  I believed they would get something passed, even for the limited purpose of getting a bill back to the House, and into conference committee.  Senator Graham subsequently announced he had a plan which he would move forward with, but that too seems to have died as Senator McConnell said the Senate is moving on.  President Trump has continued to attack on Twitter those Republican Senators who voted against the last Senate bill, Mr. McConnell and Republicans in general for the failure to pass healthcare reform.       A group of house members from the “Common Sense Caucus” have issued a set of principles to create a framework for healthcare reform.  As yet, beyond the press release, not much has happened.  Will Republicans revisit healthcare, or, in fact, let the repeal and replace mantra die.

Congresswoman Elizabeth Esty
Congresswoman Elizabeth Esty

In the end, Republicans left the Affordable Care Act in place – for now.

In today’s Congressional Corner, Connecticut Congresswoman Elizabeth Esty, a Democrat from the fifth district, continues her discussion with WAMC’s Alan Chartock.

Thousands of pregnant women pass through our nation’s jails every year. What happens to them as they carry their pregnancies in a space of punishment? In this time when the public safety net is frayed, incarceration has become a central and racialized strategy for managing the poor.

In her book Jailcare, Carolyn Sufrin explores how jail has, paradoxically, become a place where women can find care. Carolyn Sufrin is a medical anthropologist and an obstetrician-gynecologist at Johns Hopkins University School of Medicine.

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New York state stands to lose nearly $1 billion if President Trump follows through with his threat to “let Obamacare fail” and cut key health care subsidies under the Affordable Care Act.

U.S. Capitol
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The Republican healthcare plan to repeal and replace the Affordable Care Act is on the ropes in Congress as more GOP senators say they will not vote for it. Aside from healthcare, the Trump administration continues to be dogged by connections to Russia. In New York, a recent Siena College poll finds Governor Andrew Cuomo’s favorability rating has dropped significantly. WAMC's Alan Chartock hosts.

New York Lieutenant Governor Kathy Hochul
WAMC/Pat Bradley

As the health care debate continues in Washington, Democrats in New York are sounding the alarm about what the Republican plan could mean for the state. Tonight in Hudson, the Capital Region expert panel on the American Health Care Act will hold a meeting to hear public opinions about health care, and what might happen in New York if the Republican plan becomes the law of the land. 

Courtesy of HV Pattern for Progress

Former New York Republican Congressman Chris Gibson was in Poughkeepsie Thursday, giving a talk on leadership. He addressed graduates of a regional leadership program and weighed in on the federal healthcare bills.

Facebook: Williams College

Williams College will host competing lectures about healthcare. 

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Medicare.org

About a decade ago, Medicare issued new regulations giving seniors and their families a process to appeal pending hospital discharges and to make complaints about the quality of care. 

WAMC/Pat Bradley

Upstate New York Congresswoman Elise Stefanik is applauding an amendment to House Republicans’ federal health care plan. Meantime, a progressive group is preparing another protest outside her district office.

Dr. Jessica Nutik Zitter is one of only a handful of physicians in the United States double board certified to practice both pulmonary/critical care medicine AND palliative care medicine. In other words, she’s the doctor who will save you when you are admitted to the ICU with a gunshot wound, but she is also the doctor who can help you navigate a peaceful and easy way to the end when the end really arrives.

In her new book - Extreme Measures – we learn about a framework for a better way to exit life that will change our medical culture at the deepest level, and will perhaps leave you pondering, when ‘the end is near’, in our zeal to save life, are we often just worsening death?

As a third-year Harvard Medical School student doing a clinical rotation in surgery, Ronald Epstein watched an error unfold: an experienced surgeon failed to notice his patient’s kidney turning an ominous shade of blue.

In that same rotation, Epstein was awestruck by another surgeon’s ability to avert an impending disaster, slowing down from autopilot to intentionality. The difference between these two doctors left a lasting impression on Epstein and set the stage for his life’s work—to identify the qualities and habits that distinguish masterful doctors from those who are merely competent. The secret, he learned, was mindfulness.

In Attending, his first book, Dr. Epstein builds on his world-renowned, innovative programs in mindful practice and uses gripping and deeply human clinical stories to give patients a language to describe what they value most in health care and to outline a road map for doctors and other health care professionals to refocus their approach to medicine.

Even as US spending on healthcare skyrockets, impoverished Americans continue to fall ill and die of preventable conditions. Although the majority of health outcomes are shaped by non-medical factors, public and private healthcare reform efforts have largely ignored the complex local circumstances that make it difficult for struggling men, women, and children to live healthier lives.

In Dying and Living in the Neighborhood, Dr. Prabhjot Singh argues that we must look beyond the walls of the hospital and into the neighborhoods where patients live and die to address the troubling rise in chronic disease.

The O+ Festival is a celebration of art and music that creates a bridge to access health care for artists. O+ fosters complete physical, mental and social well-being by connecting artists directly with a coalition of health care providers and health resources, in a shared vision to nurture the individual and the community.

O+ was founded in 2010 in Kingston, NY – the idea has caught on and festivals have now taken place in cities all across the country. This year’s festival in Kingston takes place October 7th, 8th, and 9th.

To tell us about this year's highlights – we are joined by: Nurse-in-charge Shannon Light, pop-up clinic director; Rocket Scientist Micah Blumenthal, creative director and co-curator of music; and Art Witch Denise Orzo, art director.

Congressman Peter Welch
Congressman Peter Welch

How much should an EpiPen cost?

In today’s Congressional Corner, Vermont Representative Peter Welch tells WAMC’s Alan Chartock why his committee has been looking into that question.

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