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  • Lucy Sante is a Belgian-born nonfiction writer, art critic and cultural commentator of astonishingly wide interests, including the Beastie Boys, early photography, and the history of NYC reservoirs. Her newest book is "Nineteen Reservoirs: On Their Creation and the Promise of Water for New York City." This conversation with Lucy Sante was recorded as part of The Creative Life Series at UAlbany on October 18, 2022.
  • In the new Albany Institute of History of Art exhibit, “Paul Scott: New American Scenery,” Scott assesses the American landscape from a contemporary approach, one that deals with issues of globalization, energy generation and consumption, capitalism, and immigration, as well as the human impact on the environment.
  • “All-American Ruins” is a multimedia travelogue in which artist, activist, adventurer Blake Pfeil recounts his experiences exploring abandoned spaces across the United States and transforms them into fantastical essays of prose and poetry, audio storytelling, and documentary film.Along the way, “All-American Ruins” asks critical questions about American history/culture, community, capitalism/economics, the environment, and mental health while encouraging folks to activate their imaginations as a tool for healing.
  • A new exhibition of art installations by Catskill-based artist Marc Swanson is now at the Thomas Cole National Historic Site. The exhibition -- titled “Marc Swanson: A Memorial to Ice at the Dead Deer Disco” -- is the second part of a two-part exhibition of his work that is also on display at MASS MoCA. The exhibition is inspired by the work of Thomas Cole and his warnings about environmental damage.
  • On Saturday, August 13 at 6 p.m. at The Old Dutch Church in Kingston, New York, Amanda Palmer will play a benefit concert for O+ with special guests Holly Miranda, Chris Wells, Sophi Strand, Father Nathan Monk, and Gracie and Rachel. This is Palmers’ only major solo show this summer and her first in the United States in three years.
  • Founded by Saratoga residents Spencer and Katrina Trask in 1900, Yaddo was the first artist residency in the United States of America. It went on to welcome some of the most famous figures in the world from Sylvia Plath and Truman Capote to Walter Mosley, Laurie Anderson and David Sedaris. 7000 artists, which include winners of the Academy Award, the Pulitzer Prize, the Nobel Prize, and the National Book Award, and many, many more. We have been very fortunate to be invited into the mysterious inner sanctum of Yaddo to discuss the recent changes after a multi-million dollar stabilization and restoration of the public face. We welcome Yaddo President Elena Richardson; artist, singer, songwriter, author and performing artist Joseph keckler, and writer, performer, and visual artist James Hannaham. Both Keckler and Hannaham are on Yaddo's board and have been artists in residence.
  • This morning we get a preview of the Hilltown 6 Pottery Tour - a sampling of the work of a group of nationally recognized potters based in the Hilltowns of Western Massachusetts. Each summer, they open their studios for a coordinated tour, inviting neighbors, friends, collectors, and the curious to see their workshops, kilns, showrooms, and new work.This year’s tour is their 16th annual and runs July 23 and 24 from 10 a.m. to 5 p.m. We welcome two of the potters - Christy Knox of Natural Elements Pottery and Maya Machin of Maya Machin Pottery.
  • “Six Walks: In the Footsteps of Henry David Thoreau” is a memoir and travelog by Ben Shattuck, published by Tin House.Living through a dark period of early adulthood, Ben Shattuck, in quiet desperation, began to trace 19th century writer and naturalist Henry David Thoreau’s hikes around the northeast. Many miles and several years later, Shattuck has written a meditative journey toward personhood - expressed by placing Thoreau’s writing alongside Shattuck’s writing and illustration.
  • Art Omi in Ghent, New York presents the works of contemporary artists and architects, and offers a range of large-scale works in nature, plus a 1,500 square foot gallery. The Sculpture & Architecture Park currently offers more than 60 works by artists and architects on view, with pieces added or exchanged each year.“Raven Halfmoon: Ancestors” is the current exhibition on view in the Newmark Gallery at Art Omi through June 12. A member of the Caddo Nation, Halfmoon was born and raised in Oklahoma, and has always been strongly connected to the arts and her heritage. This is the first solo institutional exhibition of Raven Halfmoon’s work. The gallery is host to six recent large-scale ceramic sculptures. Halfmoon’s sculptures examine entanglements between past and present, sampling from an array of sources including graffiti, Caddo tattooing and mythology, and her own family history. I visited Art Omi recently and spoke with Senior Curator of the Sculpture & Architecture Park Sara O’Keefe and with artist, Raven Halfmoon.
  • David Sipress, a dreamer and obsessive drawer living with his Upper West Side family in the age of JFK and Sputnik, goes hazy when it comes to the ceaselessly imparted lessons-on-life from his meticulous father and the angsty expectations of his migraine-prone mother. With wry and brilliantly observed prose, Sipress paints his hapless place in the family, from the time he is tricked by his unreliable older sister into rocketing his pet turtle out his twelfth-floor bedroom window, to the moment he walks away from a Harvard PhD program in Russian history to begin his life as a professional cartoonist. His book is "What's So Funny?: A Cartoonist's Memoir."