climate crisis | WAMC

climate crisis

In "The Future We Choose," Christiana Figueres and Tom Rivett-Carnac, who led negotiations for the United Nations during the historic Paris Agreement of 2015, have written a cautionary but optimistic book about the world's changing climate and the fate of humanity.

The authors outline two possible scenarios for our planet. In one, they describe what life on Earth will be like by 2050 if we fail to meet the Paris climate targets. In the other, they lay out what it will be like to live in a carbon neutral, regenerative world.

Tom Rivett-Carnac joined us.

WAMC, Allison Dunne

New York Congressman Antonio Delgado has his own ideas for addressing climate change. He does not support wide-ranging Green New Deal legislation introduced in February by fellow Democrat Alexandria Ocasio-Cortez. And that had a few who attended his town hall Tuesday night in Dutchess County wondering why.

Plattsburgh college and high school students and residents gather at Amity Plaza during Global Climate Strike
Pat Bradley/WAMC

High school and college students were joined by local residents outside the SUNY Plattsburgh student center to participate in the Global Climate Strike.

The 2019 Kateri Peace Conference takes place Friday, August 16 and Saturday, August 17 at The National Kateri Tekakwitha Shrine in Fonda, New York. The 21st Annual conference is entitled “Defying Extinction - Nurturing a Garden of Resilience in the Face of Climate Crisis.”

For over 20 years the conference has met on the site of an historic Mohawk Village. This year’s conference will examine the painful existential threat of climate collapse and war.

The conference will feature presenters, educators, artists and special events.

We are joined by conference organizers John Amidon and Maureen Aumand and by one of the conferences presenters, Dahr Jamail, the author of “The End of Ice: Bearing Witness and Finding Meaning in the Path of Climate Disruption.” Jamail is also a Truthout staff reporter and has written numerous articles on climate disruption.

In California, wildfires now rage year-round, destroying thousands of homes. Across the US, “500-year” storms pummel communities month after month, and floods displace tens of millions annually. This is only a preview of the changes to come. And they are coming fast. Without a revolution in how billions of humans conduct their lives, parts of the Earth could become close to uninhabitable, and other parts horrifically inhospitable, as soon as the end of this century.

In "The Uninhabitable Earth: Life After Warming," David Wallace-Wells brings into stark relief the climate troubles that await: food shortages, refugee emergencies, and other crises that will reshape the globe.

David Wallace-Wells is a national fellow at the New America foundation and a columnist and deputy editor at New York magazine.