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WAMC 1400 AM will be off of the air Sept. 29 and 30.

COVID-19 pandemic

  • In 2020, the world experienced massive change. Millions of lives were ended—and millions more upended—by the Covid-19 pandemic. The shocking police killings of Black men and women gave rise to powerful social movements and widespread collective action to rectify centuries of injustice and racism in the United States and globally. Together, these three colossal events tested the resilience of the social fabric bringing us all together.Attempting to illuminate and make sense of this new reality, photographers from around the world documented these transformational moments as they unfolded.Curated by the founders of Scopio, a community-based image marketplace, a stunning and unforgettable visual history that captures the world’s response to major events that defined 2020: the COVID pandemic and the sweeping movements for racial and social justice.
  • We’re marking the second anniversary of the World Health Organization declaring COVID-19 a pandemic. WAMC takes a look back at our coverage of the quick and deadly spread of the disease and the scramble to respond.
  • Novak Djokovic didn’t need to give tennis fans any other reasons to hate him. Considering he may be the most accomplished tennis player of all time, he is remarkably not well received. For example, when he goes down a set at a major, fans almost instinctively cheer for the other guy. Compare that to other historic greats, like Roger Federer or Rafael Nadal or Serena Williams, or any of the other legendary figures in tennis history. Fans always rallied for greatness, as being witness to near perfection was its own reward. It’s simply never been the case with Djokovic, a reality he’s both seemingly engendered while also clearly disliking.
  • To play or not to play, that is the question. That’s the question for college football teams in bowl games, for college and NBA basketball teams that are basically fielding players from local playgrounds. And it’s the question for pretty much every youth or school league that’s entering into one protocol or another. That is sports in the age of Omicron, where you never know who might play in the Pinstripe Bowl or the Guaranteed Rate Bowl or any number of superfluous games that were once seen as a reward for college players and a way for coaches to extend their practice seasons. Already, a whole bunch of teams have pulled out, new teams have jumped in, and some games – five so far – have been cancelled altogether. In one example, Memphis flew all the way out to Hawaii for a bowl game only for the University of Hawaii to tell them they can’t play. Obviously, that scenario could have been worse – it could have been, say Shreveport, Louisiana. Rutgers filled in for Texas A&M to play against Wake Forest in the Gator Bowl, which is kind of like flying coach after selling your private jet. And the four college football playoff teams are basically crossing their fingers and trying to make sure they don’t lose either too many players or certain key players before their games on the 31st.
  • Updated health and safety policies are in place for those who plan to be on Capital Region college campuses for the Fall 2021 semester.
  • It was on March 1, 2020 that New York state confirmed the first case of a novel coronavirus that would eventually change everyday life across the United…