war | WAMC

war

Book cover for "Facing the Mountain"
Viking

Daniel James Brown, the bestselling author of “The Boys in the Boat,” has a new book entitled “Facing the Mountain.” It is a World War II saga that showcases the special Japanese American Army unit that overcame brutal odds in Europe; their families, incarcerated back home; and a young man who refused to surrender his constitutional rights, even if it meant imprisonment.

“Facing the Mountain” forces readers to grapple with questions of who willingly and unwillingly makes sacrifices for our country, how constitutional rights look different to each of us, and what it really means to be a patriot.

Book cover for "Northern Spy" by Flynn Berry
Viking

Flynn Berry, the Edgar Award-winning author of "Under the Harrow," has established herself as one of the best new voices in suspense. Her latest, "Northern Spy," is a thriller about the contemporary IRA, and two sisters who find themselves caught in the middle of the re-escalating sectarian conflict in Northern Ireland.

Book cover for "The Spymaster of Baghdad"
Day Street Books

The new book, “The Spymaster of Baghdad,” is an account of wartime espionage. It’s a true story of an elite, top-secret team of unlikely spies who came together against all odds to defeat ISIS by award-winning investigative journalist and former NYT Baghdad bureau chief, Margaret Coker.

The books tells the story of ordinary citizens who make extraordinary sacrifices. “The Spymaster of Baghdad” challenges our perceptions of terrorism and counterterrorism; Iraq and the wider Middle East; American occupation and foreign intervention.

In his long career as an acclaimed journalist covering the “hot” moments of the Cold War and its aftermath, bestselling author Robert D. Kaplan often found himself crossing paths with Bob Gersony, a consultant for the U.S. State Department whose quiet dedication and consequential work made a deep impression on Kaplan.

Gersony, a high school dropout later awarded a Bronze Star for his service in Vietnam, conducted on-the-ground research for the U.S. government in virtually every war and natural-disaster zone in the world. Gersony’s behind-the scenes fact-finding, which included interviews with hundreds of refugees and displaced persons from each war zone and natural-disaster area, often challenged the assumptions and received wisdom of the powers that be, on both the left and the right. In nearly every case, his advice and recommendations made American policy at once smarter and more humane.

Book cover for "Apeirogon"
Random House / Random House

National Book Award–winning and bestselling author Colum McCann’s latest, "Apeirogon," is an epic novel rooted in the unlikely real-life friendship between two fathers who recognize the loss that connects them and their attempt to use their grief as a weapon for peace.

Provided - Bombardier Books

Bing West is a #1 New York Times bestselling author who has spent almost sixty years on the various front lines of war, first as a Marine Corps grunt in Vietnam then as an Assistant Secretary of Defense under President Reagan before becoming one of our country’s foremost chroniclers of war.

Now, with "The Last Platoon: A Novel of the Afghanistan War" - his first novel in almost twenty years - West uses our ongoing war in Afghanistan as the brutal backdrop to tell the truth about war and its consequences.

The novel is a gritty, visceral look at the consequences of war from a man who has been on the ground of this conflict for two decades and has seen it from all sides.

The final volume of Ian Toll’s definitive history of the Pacific War, "Twilight of the Gods: War in the Western Pacific, 1944-1945," comes on the 75th anniversary of the surrender ceremony in Tokyo Bay marking the formal close of World War II.

It is narrative history, full of drama and the texture of lived reality, of decisions and actions with consequences. The book encompasses all aspects of the war, bringing each into focus, arresting both the heroic and tragic, the powerful and powerless, diplomat and warrior, sailor and admiral, American and Japanese, winner and loser - one that by its conclusion had transformed the future of the 20th century and beyond.

Ian Toll’s past books include the New York Times bestseller "The Conquering Tide," "Pacific Crucible," and "Six Frigates."

Joe Donahue: New York Times best-selling author AJ Baime's new book "Dewey Defeats Truman" gives us the story of what happened to Truman's presidency after the bomb was dropped. The chronicles the story of the 1948 presidential election, one of the greatest election stories of all time, as Truman mounted a history-making comeback and staked a claim for a new course for America. On the eve of the 1948 election, America was a fractured country, racism was rampant foreign relations were fraught and political parties were more divided than ever.

Americans were certain that President Harry S. Truman's political career was over. The only man in the world confident that Truman would win was Mr. Truman himself, and win he did. AJ Baime is the author of "The Accidental President: Harry S. Truman and the Four Months That Changed the World," and is a longtime regular contributor to The Wall Street Journal. 

Joe Donahue: Steve Shenkin's book "Bomb: The Race to Build-and Steal- The World's Most Dangerous Weapon" was a National Book Award finalist, a Newbery Honor book and really required reading for anyone who is interested in what happened in 1945, with the dropping of the atomic bomb. 

Chris Wallace is a veteran journalist and anchor of Fox News Sunday. His new book, "Countdown 1945: The Extraordinary Story of the 116 Days That Changed the World," a behind-the-scenes account of the secret meetings and lead up to the world's first use of the atomic bomb in wartime-the American attack on Hiroshima on August 6, 1945. 

Even now, after more than fifteen years, it is hard to see the invasion of Iraq through the cool, considered gaze of history. Most of the major players in that decision are still with us, and few are not haunted by it.

New York Times contributor and author Robert Draper talked to most of the key officials involved to revisit their roles, among them Powell, Armitage, Rice, Wolfowitz, Feith, Tenet, Bremer, Fleischer; he interviewed dozens who worked in the Departments of State, Defense, the National Security Council and the intelligence community, as well reporters who fumbled or challenged the story at the time.

The result is his new book, "To Start a War: How the Bush Administration Took America Into Iraq," is a psychologically complex and page-turning account: it includes a set of obsessed actors who gamed the process relentlessly as well as a group of patriotic men and women who, in the wake of the nightmare of 9/11, pursued that most elusive of dreams: finding peace through war.

The book, “Bending the Arc: Striving for Peace and Justice in the Age of Endless War,” is a collection narrating how peace activists found their calling and why the world still needs peace activism. Drawing from diverse philosophical and spiritual traditions, contributors share their experiences of working for peace and justice and discuss the obstacles to both.

They address a wide range of contemporary problems, including the war on terror, killer drones, the invasions and occupations of Afghanistan and Iraq, mass surveillance, the human cost of war, political-economic impediments to peace, violent extremism, the role of women in peace-building, and the continued threat of nuclear weapons.

“Bending the Arc: Striving for Peace and Justice in the Age of Endless War” is also the title of The 2020 Kateri Peace Conference – which will take place on Zoom on August 21 and 22. Contributor Ann Wright and editor Steve Breyman join us.

Mary Jo McConahay is an award-winning reporter who covered the wars in Central America and economics in the Middle East. She has traveled in seventy countries and has been fascinated by the history of World War II since childhood, when she listened to the stories of her father, a veteran U.S. Navy officer.

In her new book, "The Tango War" she fills an important gap in WWII history.

Beginning in the thirties, both sides were well aware of the need to control not just the hearts and minds but also the resources of Latin America. The fight was often dirty: residents were captured to exchange for U.S. prisoners of war and rival spy networks shadowed each other across the continent. At all times it was a Tango War, in which each side closely shadowed the other’s steps.

Ruta Sepetys is an internationally acclaimed, New York Times bestselling author of historical fiction published in over sixty countries and forty languages. Sepetys is considered a "crossover" novelist, as her books are read by both teens and adults worldwide.

In her latest work, "The Fountains of Silence," Sepetys shines light into one of history’s darkest corners in a novel about identity, unforgettable love, repercussions of war, and the hidden violence of silence–inspired by the true postwar struggles of Spain.

Peter Pomerantsev is a Visiting Senior Fellow at the Institute of Global Affairs at the London School of Economics, an author and TV producer. He studies propaganda and media development, and has testified on the challenges of information war to the US House Foreign Affairs Committee, US Senate Foreign Relations Committee and the UK Parliament Defense Select Committee.

In his new book, "This Is Not Propaganda: Adventures in the War Against Reality," he writes from the front lines of the disinformation age, where he meets Twitter revolutionaries and pop-up populists, “behavioral change” salesmen, Jihadi fanboys, Identitarians, truth cops, and many others. Forty years after his dissident parents were pursued by the KGB, Pomerantsev finds the Kremlin re-emerging as a great propaganda power.

Hailed by critics, "Lovely War" has received seven starred reviews and is an indie bestseller. Author Julie Berry has been called "a modern master of historical fiction" by Bookpage and "a celestially inspired storyteller" by the New York Times.

They are Hazel, James, Aubrey, and Colette. A classical pianist from London, a British would-be architect-turned-soldier, a Harlem-born ragtime genius in the U.S. Army, and a Belgian orphan with a gorgeous voice and a devastating past. Their story, as told by goddess Aphrodite, who must spin the tale or face judgment on Mount Olympus, is filled with hope and heartbreak, prejudice and passion, and reveals that, though War is a formidable force, it's no match for the transcendent power of Love.

Raised by powerful women in a restrictive, sheltered Christian community in New England, Ryan Dostie never imagined herself on the front lines of a war halfway around the world. But then a conversation with an Army recruiter in her high-school cafeteria changed the course of her life. Hired as a linguist, she quickly had to find a space for herself in the testosterone-filled world of the Army barracks, and had been holding her own until the unthinkable happened: she was raped by a fellow soldier.

Struggling with PTSD and commanders who didn’t trust her story, Dostie found herself fighting through the isolation of trauma amid the challenges of an unexpected war. Dostie tells her story in the new book, Formation: A Woman's Memoir of Stepping Out of Line.

The 2019 Kateri Peace Conference takes place Friday, August 16 and Saturday, August 17 at The National Kateri Tekakwitha Shrine in Fonda, New York. The 21st Annual conference is entitled “Defying Extinction - Nurturing a Garden of Resilience in the Face of Climate Crisis.”

For over 20 years the conference has met on the site of an historic Mohawk Village. This year’s conference will examine the painful existential threat of climate collapse and war.

The conference will feature presenters, educators, artists and special events.

We are joined by conference organizers John Amidon and Maureen Aumand and by one of the conferences presenters, Dahr Jamail, the author of “The End of Ice: Bearing Witness and Finding Meaning in the Path of Climate Disruption.” Jamail is also a Truthout staff reporter and has written numerous articles on climate disruption.

Pam Jenoff is the author of several books of historical fiction, including the New York Times bestseller "The Orphan's Tale." Her novels are inspired by her experiences working at the Pentagon and as a diplomat for the State Department handling Holocaust issues in Poland.

Her new book, "The Lost Girls of Paris,"shines a light on the incredible heroics of a network of female secret agents in World War II and weaves a mesmerizing tale of courage, sisterhood and the great strength of women to survive in the hardest of circumstances.

Private First Class Bowe Bergdahl left his platoon's base in eastern Afghanistan in the early hours of June 30, 2009. Since that day, easy answers to the many questions surrounding his case: Why did he leave his post? What kinds of efforts were made to recover him from the Taliban? And why, facing a court martial, did he plead guilty to the serious charges against him? -- have proved elusive.

"American Cipher" is an account of the nearly decade-old Bergdahl tragedy, which, as journalist Michael Ames argues, is as illuminating an episode as we have as we seek the larger truths of how the United States lost its way in Afghanistan.

The book was researched with more than 20 hours of interviews with Bob and Jani Bergdahl, Bowe’s parents, who have not spoken to any media outlets since the political firestorm that followed their son’s recovery.

In late summer 1940, as war spread across Europe and as the nation pulled itself out of the Great Depression, an anti-communist hysteria convulsed New York City. Targeting the city’s municipal colleges and public schools, the New York state legislature’s Rapp-Coudert investigation dragged hundreds of suspects before public and private tribunals to root out a perceived communist conspiracy to hijack the city’s teachers unions, subvert public education, and indoctrinate the nation’s youth.

Drawing on the vast archive of Rapp-Coudert records, Union College History Professor Andrew Feffer looks to provide the first full history of this witch-hunt, which lasted from August 1940 to March 1942.

He does so in the new book: "Bad Faith: Teachers, Liberalism, and the Origins of McCarthyism." Andrew Feffer is Professor of History and Co-Director of the Interdisciplinary Program in Film Studies at Union College.

Scott Silverstone is an ASU Future of War Fellow at New America and a professor of international relations at the United States Military Academy at West Point. His new book, "From Hitler's Germany to Saddam's Iraq: The Enduring False Promise of Preventive War."

This book challenges conventional wisdom about the value of preventive war. Beginning with the rise of German power and the French and British response to the Rhineland crisis leading to World War II, Silverstone overturns the common impulse to point an accusing finger at British leadership for its alleged naïveté, willful blindness, or outright cowardice.

Silverstone argues that the Rhineland crisis is a critical case for studying a central dynamic of world history - power shifts among states - and the preventive war temptation that power shifts frequently produce.

The birth of South Sudan was celebrated the world round, a triumph for global justice and the end of one of the world’s most devastating wars. The Republic’s historic independence was acclaimed not only by its long-oppressed people, but by three U.S. presidents and the legions of Americans who championed their cause. But the celebration would not last; South Sudan’s freedom-fighters soon plunged their new nation back into chaos, shattering the promise of liberation and exposing the hubris of their American backers.

Drawing on personal stories of identity, liberation, and survival, "A Rope from the Sky" tells an epic story of paradise won and then lost. Zach Vertin’s firsthand accounts from deadly war zones to the halls of Washington power bring readers on an extraordinary journey into the rise and fall of the world’s newest state. South Sudan’s untold story is a unique episode in global history: an unprecedented experiment in international state-building, and a cautionary tale.

Jez Butterworth’s, “The Ferryman” is currently running on Broadway at The Jacobs Theatre. The New York Times review of the production called the show “... an endlessly vibrant work, directed with sweeping passion and meticulous care by Sam Mendes.” The review went on to say: “This is theater as charged and expansive as life itself.” The West End production won three Obie Awards - including Best New Play and Best Director.

Set in rural Northern Ireland in 1981, The Carney farmhouse is a hive of activity with preparations for the annual harvest. Three generations of Carney’s live in the house - a family tree with a jumble of branches connecting on this special annual event to cousins, strays, and - unwanted by most in the house - a cause with dire consequences.

Mark Lambert plays Uncle Patrick Carney - or “Uncle Pat” - a jovial storyteller and keeper of household tradition. Lambert, who has an illustrious career on the stage primarily in London and Dublin, makes his Broadway debut in "The Ferryman."

National Book Award finalist Elliot Ackerman’s new novel, “Waiting for Eden,” tells the devastating story of a husband and wife who cannot communicate with one another, two friends who face the sheer unknowability of the divide between life and death, and is a portrayal of a mind that no longer has mastery over the body it serves.

Lawrence O’Donnell has been a student of American politics for most of his life. A former senior advisor to Senator Daniel Patrick Moynihan, chief of staff of two Senate committees, an Emmy Award-winning executive producer and writer for “The West Wing,” and now host of his own MSNBC show “The Last Word,” O’Donnell has a coveted front row seat to American democracy in action.

While recent elections, still fresh in all our memories, produced many crazy headlines and tumultuous debates, “Playing With Fire: The 1968 Election and the Transformation of American Politics” vividly recreates an even darker, more chaotic time in our nation’s history, in which one election was literally a “matter of life and death - nothing less.”

A new, single volume of history sets out to explore the experiment in government that is the United States. Award-winning Harvard historian Jill Lepore, author of “These Truths: A History of the United States,” looks to explore how we now understand the role of women and people of color in our political heritage, and how to put today’s politics of division in proportion.

Nathaniel Philbrick, one of America’s pre-eminent historians, and the National Book Award-winning and New York Times bestselling author of In the Heart of the Sea, Bunker Hill, and Valiant Ambition, returns to the American Revolution, a subject he’s researched and written about for twenty years.

His new book, "In The Hurricane’s Eye: The Genius of George Washington and the Victory at Yorktown," chronicles the remarkable year leading up to the siege of Yorktown, the battle that ultimately broke a years-long stalemate with the British and earned America her freedom.

"In The Hurricane’s Eye" also highlights Washington’s underappreciated naval cunning and his fraught relationship with French leaders.

The Tomb of the Unknown Soldier is sacred ground at Arlington National Cemetery. Originally constructed in 1921 to hold one of the thousands of unidentified American soldiers lost in World War I, it now also contains unknowns from World War II and the Korean and Vietnam Wars, and receives millions of visitors each year who pay silent tribute.

In "The Unknowns: The Untold Story of America’s Unknown Soldier and WWI’s Most Decorated Heroes Who Brought Him Home," celebrated military historian and bestselling author Patrick O’Donnell illuminates the saga behind the creation of the Tomb itself and recreates the moving ceremony during which it was consecrated and the eight Body Bearers, and the sergeant who had chosen the one body to be interred, solemnly united.

What happened in 1983 to make the Soviet Union so afraid of a potential nuclear strike from the United States that they sent mobile intercontinental ballistic missiles into the field, placing them on a three-minute alert?

In his book, "The Brink: President Reagan and the Nuclear War Scare of 1983," Marc Ambinder explains the anxious period between the United States and the Soviet Union from 1982 to 1984, with the “Able Archer ’83” war game as the fulcrum of the tension. With astonishing and clarifying new details, he recounts the scary series of the close encounters that tested the limits of ordinary humans and powerful leaders alike. Ambinder explains how political leadership ultimately triumphed over misunderstandings, helping the two countries maintain a fragile peace.

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