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Jason Bourne is back - newly entrusted to New York Times bestselling author Brian Freeman. With millions of books sold and a movie franchise that has grossed over $1.6 billion, Jason Bourne straddles the top echelon of action heroes, beloved by millions of fans. Bringing old skills and new plot twists, Robert Ludlum’s The Bourne Evolution is an action-packed addition to the canon of Bourne, America’s most enduring, intriguing, and complex hero.

Leah Konen’s adult debut "All The Broken People," is an unpredictable domestic thriller in which a faked death goes horribly awry.

Set in Woodstock, NY, All the Broken People, introduces twenty-eight-year-old Lucy King, a woman who, in a desperate bid for a fresh start, gets far more than she bargained for.

Soon after arriving at her rustic rental cottage, Lucy meets Vera and John, the disarmingly attractive couple next door whose friendship proves impossible to resist.

With her rocky past behind her, Lucy is happily settling into her new home when her artsy new mentors deliver a staggering bombshell: They, too, need to escape their own small-town troubles, and the only way to wipe the slate clean and start anew is if Lucy helps them fake John's death.

Cyclonic hordes of insects, a telepathic despot, body-swapping sex - just a few of the surprises Salvador Samuels encounters when he’s swept back to precolonial times, walking in the moccasins of a blind Indian - who, in turn, has been transported into Salvador’s body in present-day America.

Four hundred years apart, they’re bound by a mission to rescue our world, aided by the mysterious presence of the mounds. Thousands of these ancient earthworks once dotted the landscape of North America. We still don’t know why they were created. Jim Metzner's novel "Sacred Mounds" suggests they are as important today as when they were made over a thousand years ago.

"Sacred Mounds" weaves the stories of two men, each a stranger in a strange land. With the help of two remarkable women, they must find a way to save our planet and return home.

Joe Donaue: Megha Majumdar's debut novel "A Burning" is about three characters whose lives become entwined after a terrorist attack in India. It is taut, electrifying, and dazzling. Jivan is a Muslim girl from the slums determined to move up in life who is accused of executing a terrorist attack on a train because of a careless comment on Facebook. PT Sir is an opportunistic gym teacher who hitches his aspirations to a right wing political party, and finds that his own ascent becomes linked to Jivan's fall. Lovely is an irresistible outcast who has the alibi that can set Jivan free, but it will cost her everything that she holds dear. Megha Majumdar grew up in Kolkata, India and studied social anthropology at Harvard and Johns Hopkins. She is currently an editor at Catapult. This is her first novel. 

Elizabeth George is one of the most acclaimed mystery writers of the last two decades. The books in her Inspector Lindley series are mainstays on bestseller lists across the country, with each installment garnering rave reviews, an incredible feat for an American writer tackling British crime fiction.

Her ability to create characters who grow and evolve over two dozen novels develop scenes that take readers into a picture ask English setting and construct intricate plot twists that make her novels the definition of a page turner that has cemented her as one of the great crime novelists writing today at events Elizabeth George is often asked: "How do you do it?"

So, in her new book, "Mastering the Process: From Idea to Novel," she shares her method to creating one of the most beloved mystery series ever written.

What would have happened if Hillary Rodham had never married Bill Clinton? In real life, Bill Clinton proposed to Hillary Rodham twice and she said no, until the third time. In author Curtis Sittenfeld's new novel, "Rodham," she says no the third time, too. And she goes her own way to become a law professor, and then a politician. 

Joe Donahue: In the new thriller “The End of October” from the Pulitzer Prize winner and bestselling author Lawrence Wright, Dr. Henry Parsons an unlikely but appealing hero, races to find the origins and cure of a mysterious new killer virus as it brings the world to its knees. The novel has a virus that starts in Asia, sweeps across continents, cripples the healthcare system wrecks the economy and kills scores of people worldwide. Yes, eerily prescient. And Lawrence Wright is a Pulitzer Prize winning author, screenwriter, staff writer for The New Yorker magazine and fellow at the Center for Law and Security at the New York University School of Law. 

Brian Platzer has an MFA from the Johns Hopkins Writing Seminars, and a BA from Columbia University. His writing has appeared often in The New Yorker’s “Shouts and Murmurs” and McSweeney’s “Internet Tendency,” as well as in The New York Times, The New Republic, Salon, and elsewhere.

He is the author of the novels "Bed-Stuy Is Burning" and now "The Body Politic."

The new novel explores the meaning of commitment, the nature of forgiveness, the way that buried secrets will always find their way to the surface, and how all of it can shift—and eventually erupt—over the course of a life.

Welcome to the Book Show, a celebration of reading and writers, I'm Joe Donahue. Anne Tyler is one of America's very best living novelists, and one of the world's most loved. She has written 23 novels, sold more than 11 million copies. Her 20th book “A Spool of Blue Thread” was shortlisted for the Man Booker Prize. Her 11th, “Breathing Lessons” won the Pulitzer Prize. Her other bestsellers include “The Accidental Tourist”, “Say Maybe”, “Dinner at the Homesick Restaurant” and most recently, “Vinegar Girl” and “Clock Dance”.

The themes she continues to return to involve marriage, family dynamics, sibling relationships, growing old, and dying. She sets her stories where she lives in Baltimore, Maryland. Her latest titled “Redhead by the Side of the Road” is no exception. The novel focuses on routine-obsessed 44 year-old Micah Mortimer, whose life is about to be thrown out of whack. The novel is about misperception second chances and the sometimes elusive power of human connections. Again, the new novel is “Redhead by the Side of the Road” and it is a great thrill to welcome Anne Tyler to The Book Show.

Jenny Offill's new novel, "Weather," is about a family, and a nation, in crisis.

Lizzie Benson slid into her job as a librarian without a traditional degree, but this gives her a vantage point from which to practice her other calling: she is a fake shrink which sees her advice grow increasingly apocalyptic and unhinged.

Megan Angelo’s new novel, “Followers,” is an electrifying story of two ambitious friends, the dark choices they make and the stunning moment that changes the world as we know it forever

In the novel, Orla Cadden is a budding novelist stuck in a dead-end job, writing clickbait about movie-star hookups and influencer yoga moves. Then Orla meets Floss, a striving, wannabe A-lister, who comes up with a plan for launching them both into the high-profile lives they dream about. So, what if Orla and Floss’s methods are a little shady and sometimes people get hurt? Their legions of followers can’t be wrong.

Megan Angelo’s writing has appeared in The New York Times, The Wall Street Journal, Glamour and Elle, among other publications. "Followers" is her debut novel.

When the decorated Captain of a great ship descends the gangplank for the final time, a new leader, a man with a yellow feather in his hair, vows to step forward. Though he has no experience, no knowledge of nautical navigation or maritime law, and though he has often remarked he doesn’t much like boats, he solemnly swears to shake things up.

Dave Eggers’ new novel "The Captain and The Glory: An Entertainment," is a savage satire of the United States in the throes of insanity that tells the story of a noble ship, the Glory, and the loud, clownish, and foul Captain who steers it to the brink of disaster.

“Everyone lies about their lives. What would happen if you shared the truth instead?” These are the opening lines in the little green notebook Monica finds in the café she owns, lines that will change her life forever, in Clare Pooley’s debut novel, “The Authenticity Project.”

This green notebook, with the words “The Authenticity Project” scrawled across the front, will travel from the little neighborhood of Fulham in London, around the world to Thailand and back. As it does, it is passed into the hands of six strangers, who use the notebook to reveal their true selves. In the process, they are able to connect with people in real life.

Clare Pooley knows exactly what it’s like to hide behind a life that looks perfect from the outside. For twenty years she worked in advertising and also maintained the outward appearance of the perfectly happy wife and mother, all while obscuring the realities of motherhood and her drinking problem.

Pooley admits that sharing her truth with the public was terrifying, but it changed her life for the better, and soon she began to wonder: what would happen if everyone did the same? Thus, the idea for “The Authenticity Project” was born.

Book Cover for "Outside Looking In" and author photo of T.C. Boyle
Author Photo - Jamieson Fry

T.C. Boyle's novel, "Outside Looking In," takes readers back to the 1960s and to the early days of LSD.

The book tells the story of Harvard Ph.D. students whose lives veer out of control after they are drawn into the orbit of renowned psychologist and LSD enthusiast Timothy Leary.

Hank Green is the CEO of Complexly, a production company that creates educational content, including Crash Course and SciShow. Green co-founded a number of other small businesses, including DFTBA.com, which helps online creators make money by selling cool stuff to their communities; and VidCon, the world's largest conference for the online video community.

In 2017, VidCon drew more than forty thousand attendees across three events in Anaheim, Amsterdam, and Australia. Hank and his brother, John, also started the Project for Awesome.

He joined us to talk about his debut novel "An Absolutely Remarkable Thing."

Book Cover for "On Earth We're Briefly Gorgeous" and author photo of Ocean Vuong
Author photo by Tom Hines

Brilliant, heartbreaking, tender, and highly original - poet Ocean Vuong’s debut novel, “On Earth, We’re Briefly Gorgeous,” is a sweeping and shattering portrait of a family, and a testament to the redemptive power of storytelling written as a letter from a son to a mother who cannot read. 

Ruta Sepetys is an internationally acclaimed, New York Times bestselling author of historical fiction published in over sixty countries and forty languages. Sepetys is considered a "crossover" novelist, as her books are read by both teens and adults worldwide.

In her latest work, "The Fountains of Silence," Sepetys shines light into one of history’s darkest corners in a novel about identity, unforgettable love, repercussions of war, and the hidden violence of silence–inspired by the true postwar struggles of Spain.

Sean Penn won Academy Awards for Best Actor for his performances in “Mystic River” and “Milk.” He is also a novelist. His debut novel was “Bob Honey Who Just Do Stuff” and he’s followed it up with the sequel “Bob Honey Sings Jimmy Crack Corn,” where he follows the exploits of Bob Honey, a septic tank entrepreneur turned international mallet-wielding assassin.

Alice Hoffman’s latest book is a bittersweet parable about the costs of survival and the behaviors that define humanity. “The World That We Knew” is set in Berlin in 1941. It follows the lives of three women who become intertwined in order to survive the dangers of the Nazi regime.

This is an Off The Shelf edition of The Book Show, recorded in Saratoga Springs in an event presented by Northshire Bookstore.

Petina Gappah is an award-winning and widely translated Zimbabwean writer. She is the author of two novels and two short story collections. Her work has also been published in, among others, The New Yorker, Der Spiegel, The Financial Times, and the Africa Report. For many years, Petina worked as an international trade lawyer at the highest levels of diplomacy in Geneva where she advised more than seventy developing countries from Africa, Asia, the Caribbean and Latin America on trade law and policy. Petina has also been a DAAD Writing Fellow in Berlin, an Open Society Fellow and a Livingstone Scholar at Cambridge University. She has law degrees from Cambridge, Graz University in Austria, and the University of Zimbabwe.

In her latest novel, "Out of Darkness, Shining Light," she imagines the captivating story of the loyal men and women who carried explorer and missionary Dr. Livingstone's body, his papers and maps, fifteen hundred miles across the continent of Africa, so his remains could be returned home to England.

In Peter Steiner's novel "The Good Cop" it's 1920 in Munich. Detective Willi Geismeier has a problem: how do you uphold the law when the law goes bad? The First World War has been lost and Germany is in turmoil. The new government in Berlin is weak. The police and courts are corrupt. Fascists and Communists are fighting in the streets. People want a savior, someone who can make Germany great again. To many, Adolf Hitler seems perfect for the job.

When the offices of a Munich newspaper are bombed, Willi Geismeier investigates, but as it gets political, he is taken off the case. Willi continues to ask questions, but when his pursuit of the truth itself becomes a crime, his career and his life are in grave danger.

Peter Steiner is the author of the critically acclaimed Louis Morgon series of crime novels. He is also a cartoonist for The New Yorker Magazine.

Richard Russo’s new novel, "Chances Are...," is out today. In it, three sixty-six-year old men convene on Martha's Vineyard one beautiful September day, friends ever since meeting in college circa the sixties. They couldn't have been more different then, or even today.

Lincoln's a commercial real estate broker, Teddy a tiny-press publisher, and Mickey a musician beyond his rockin' age. But each man holds his own secrets, in addition to the monumental mystery that none of them has ever stopped puzzling over since a Memorial Day weekend on the Vineyard in 1971.

Richard Russo is the author of eight novels, most recently "Everybody’s Fool" and "That Old Cape Magic;" two collections of stories; and the memoir "Elsewhere." In 2002 he received the Pulitzer Prize for "Empire Falls."

Russo will join Joe Donahue to discuss the new novel, "Chances Are..," on Wednesday, August 21 at 7 p.m. at the Arthur Zankel Music Center at Skidmore College in an Off The Shelf taping of The Book Show presented by Northshire Bookstore.

"Sugar Land" by Tammy Lynne Stoner is an award-winning southern novel about love, Lead Belly, and liberation.

It's 1923 in Midland, Texas, and Miss Dara falls in love with her best friend - who also happens to be a girl. Terrified, Miss Dara takes a job at the Imperial State Prison Farm for men. Once there, she befriends inmate and soon-to-be legendary blues singer Lead Belly, who sings his way out but only after he makes her promise to free herself from her own prison.

Tammy Lynn Stoner’s work has been selected for more than a dozen anthologies and literary journals.

Nathan Englander once again tackles the complexities of contemporary Jewish life in his new novel, "kaddish.com."

When an atheist's Orthodox father dies, he is called upon by his mother and sisters to perform the prayer for the dead - every day for 11 months. Reluctant, he hires someone from the title website to recite the Kaddish for him.

Joshua Furst is the author of "Short People" and "The Sabotage Café," as well as several plays that have been produced in New York, where for a number of years he taught in the public schools. A graduate of the Iowa Writers’ Workshop, he’s the recipient of a Michener Fellowship, the Chicago Tribune‘s Nelson Algren Award, and fellowships from the MacDowell Colony and Ledig House. He lives in New York City and teaches at Columbia University.

His new book "Revolutionaries" leads readers on a long, strange trip through the heart of the sixties and beyond, as seen through the eyes of the revolution’s poster child.

John Lanchester is the author of five novels, including his latest, "The Wall," the best-selling "Debt to Pleasure," and "Capital," as well as several works of nonfiction, including "I.O.U." and "How to Speak Money."

"The Wall" is a novel of a broken world and what might be found when all is lost. It blends the issues of our time, rising waters, rising fear, rising political division, into a suspenseful story of love, trust, and survival.

 Lauren Wilkinson earned an MFA in fiction and literary translation from Columbia University, and has taught writing at Columbia and the Fashion Institute of Technology. She was a 2013 Center for Fiction Emerging Writers Fellow, and has also received support from the MacDowell Colony and the Djerassi Resident Artists Program.

In her debut novel, "American Spy," it's 1986, the heart of the Cold War, and Marie Mitchell is an intelligence officer with the FBI. She’s brilliant, but she’s also a young black woman working in an old boys’ club. Her career has stalled out, she’s overlooked for every high-profile squad, and her days are filled with monotonous paperwork. So when she’s given the opportunity to join a shadowy task force aimed at undermining Thomas Sankara, the charismatic revolutionary president of Burkina Faso whose Communist ideology has made him a target for American intervention, she says yes.

Andrea Bartz is a Brooklyn-based journalist and coauthor of the blog-turned-book "Stuff Hipsters Hate," which The New Yorker called “depressingly astute.” Her work has appeared in The Wall Street Journal, Marie Claire, Vogue, Cosmopolitan, Women’s Health, Martha Stewart Living, Redbook, Elle, and many other outlets, and she’s held editorial positions at Glamour, Psychology Today, and Self, among other titles.

Her debut novel, "The Lost Night," is a tightly paced thriller. In 2009, Edie had New York’s social world in her thrall. When Edie’s body was found near a suicide note at the end of a long, drunken night, no one could believe it. Grief, shock, and resentment scattered the group and brought the era to an abrupt end.

A decade later, Lindsay has come a long way from the drug-addled world of her youth in 2009, but when a chance reunion leads Lindsay to discover an unsettling video from that hazy night, she starts to wonder if Edie was actually murdered and, worse, if she herself was involved.

While America has never had a royal family, it certainly has dynasties. From the Kennedys to the Vanderbilts to the Rockefellers - wealthy and influential families who rule the gossip pages, society balls, charity functions, red carpets, and, even social media.

America’s fascination with the wealth and scandal of the upperclasses never fades. Maura Roosevelt, the great-granddaughter of Eleanor Roosevelt and President Franklin Delano Roosevelt, invites readers into the hearts of an American family dynasty in its twilight years in "Baby Of The Family," a debut novel about the Whitbys: a family with a legacy akin to the Astors, once enormously wealthy real estate magnates who were considered “The Landlords of New York.”

Maura Roosevelt has been a full-time Lecturer in NYU's essay writing program, and currently she's teaching writing at USC.

Vanessa Hua is a columnist for the San Francisco Chronicle and the author of a short story collection, "Deceit and Other Possibilities." For two decades, she has been writing, in journalism and fiction, about Asia and the Asian diaspora.

In her new novel, "A River of Stars," Scarlett Chen is far from her native China, where she worked in a factory and fell in love with the owner, Boss Yeung -- holed up with other mothers-to-be in a secret maternity home in Los Angeles. Now she’s carrying Boss Yeung's baby. Already married with three daughters, Boss Yeung is overjoyed because the doctors have confirmed that he will finally have the son he has always wanted. To ensure that his child has every advantage, Boss Yeung has shipped Scarlett off to give birth on American soil. U.S. citizenship will open doors for their little prince.

As Scarlett awaits the baby’s arrival, she chokes down bitter medicinal stews and spars with her imperious housemates. The only one who fits in even less is Daisy, a spirited teenager and fellow unwed mother who is being kept apart from her American boyfriend.

Then a new sonogram of Scarlett’s baby reveals the unexpected. Panicked, she escapes by hijacking a van - only to discover that she has a stowaway: Daisy, who intends to track down the father of her child. The two flee to San Francisco’s bustling Chinatown, where Scarlett will join countless immigrants desperately trying to seize their piece of the American dream. What Scarlett doesn’t know is that her baby’s father is not far behind her.

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