navy

Nathaniel Philbrick, one of America’s pre-eminent historians, and the National Book Award-winning and New York Times bestselling author of In the Heart of the Sea, Bunker Hill, and Valiant Ambition, returns to the American Revolution, a subject he’s researched and written about for twenty years.

His new book, "In The Hurricane’s Eye: The Genius of George Washington and the Victory at Yorktown," chronicles the remarkable year leading up to the siege of Yorktown, the battle that ultimately broke a years-long stalemate with the British and earned America her freedom.

"In The Hurricane’s Eye" also highlights Washington’s underappreciated naval cunning and his fraught relationship with French leaders.

James J. Florio is best known as governor of New Jersey from 1990 to 1994. But his career in local, state, and national government is far more varied, and his achievements as a progressive reformer are more substantial than most realize. 

His political memoir, "Standing on Principle: Lessons Learned in Public Life," tells the remarkable story of how Florio, a high school dropout who left to join the Navy as a teenager, went on to become an attorney, a state assemblyman, a congressman, and a governor. A passionate defender of the environment, Florio played a crucial role in the enactment of 1980s-era Superfund laws, which helped to clean up toxic waste sites in New Jersey and around the country.

“Manhattan Beach” is the latest from Pulitzer-Prize winning novelist Jennifer Egan. It is a haunting and propulsive WWII-era novel that tells the intertwined stories of Anna Kerrigan, a Brooklyn Navy Yard diver, her father Eddie Kerrigan, a longshoreman turned small-time gangster, and Eddie’s connected boss, Dexter Styles.

WAMC, Allison Dunne

The funeral service for Petty Officer First Class Corey Ingram was held Tuesday at the Mid-Hudson Civic Center in Poughkeepsie. Family, friends, service and community members filed in past lined-up Patriot Guard riders to pay their respects.

Admiral James Stavridis is one of the most admired admirals of his generation and the only admiral to serve as Supreme Allied Commander at NATO. His new book Sea Power: The History and Geopolitics of the World’s Oceans takes readers on a voyage through the world’s most important bodies of water, providing the story of naval power as a driver of human history and a crucial element in our current geopolitical path. 

A retired 4-star admiral with 35 years of active service in the Navy, Stavridis served as the Supreme Allied Commander for Global Operations at NATO from 2009 to 2013. Again, his new book is Sea Power: The History and Geopolitics of the World’s Oceans

In 1797, eight years after the mutiny on the HMS Bounty, came a mutiny aboard the British frigate HMS Hermione—the bloodiest mutiny ever suffered by the Royal Navy.  In American Sanctuary, historian and author Roger Ekirch shares the story of Jonathan Robbins, one of the mutineers who made his way to American shores, and for whom the British called for extradition. 

He let it be known that he was an American citizen from Connecticut and had been impressed into service by the British. In one of the most catastrophic blunders of his administration, the extradition was sanctioned by President John Adams, and Robbins was sentenced to death by the British and hanged. Adams’ miscalculation ignited a political firestorm, fanned by the news of Robbins’ execution without his constitutional rights of due process and trial by jury. 

Captain David Little
U.S. Navy

A Navy pilot who grew up and attended school in the Glens Falls-Queensbury area will be back hime this week speaking with students, community members and elected officials about the fight against ISIS. Captain David Little, whose mother is state Senator Betty Little, is the commander of Carrier Air Wing Seven, assigned to the aircraft carrier U.S.S. Harry Truman.

  It gets less press than debate over Middle East security needs, but seapower remains a focus of U.S. defense.

In today’s Congressional Corner, WAMC’s Alan Chartock speaks with Connecticut representative Joe Courtney about the need for advanced submarines.

  Parts of our region play a major role in the country’s naval defenses.

In today’s Congressional Corner, Connecticut representative Joe Courtney tells WAMC’s Alan Chartock about Electric Boat.

  On July 17, 1944, a massive explosion rocked the segregated Navy base at Port Chicago, California, killing more than 300 sailors who were at the docks, critically injuring off-duty men in their bunks, and shattering windows up to a mile away.

On August 9th, 244 men refused to go back to work until unsafe and unfair conditions at the docks were addressed. When the dust settled, fifty were charged with mutiny, facing decades in jail and even execution.