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murder

Book cover for "When Evil Lived in Laurel"
W. W. Norton & Company / W. W. Norton & Company

In January 1966, Vernon Dahmer, head of a Mississippi chapter of the NAACP and a dedicated advocate for voter registration, was murdered by the White Knights, one of the most violent sects of the KKK in the South.

Veteran journalist Curtis Wilkie’s "When Evil Lived in Laurel" is the chilling story of this little-known brutal murder from the Civil Rights era and its aftermath, which ultimately led to the downfall of the infamous Imperial Wizard Sam Bowers and the destruction of his virulently racist organization.

To recreate these harrowing events—the conversations, incendiary nighttime meetings, plans leading up to Dahmer’s murder, and the nearly botched execution of them—Wilkie drew on his exclusive access to the almost daily journals, kept secret for fifty years, of a former Klan infiltrator for the FBI who risked his life to help break the White Knights.

Book cover for The Constant Man
Severn House / Severn House

Former detective Willi Geimeiser is a wanted man. He sacrificed his career and put his life on the line by exposing a high-ranking Nazi official as a murderer, and is now in hiding in a cabin deep in the Bavarian forest. But when his friend, Lola, is savagely attacked, Willi returns to Munich in disguise and under a new identity - Karl Juncker - determined to find the perpetrator.

"The Constant Man" is Peter Steiner's second Willi Geimeiser novel, the first is "The Good Cop."

Peter Steiner is the author of the critically acclaimed Louis Morgon series of crime novels. He is also a cartoonist for The New Yorker and is the creator of one of the most famous cartoons of the technological age which prompted the adage, 'On the Internet, nobody knows you're a dog.'

4/21/21 RT Panel

Apr 21, 2021
Microphone in radio studio
WAMC / WAMC

            The Roundtable Panel: a daily open discussion of issues in the news and beyond.

Today's panelists are WAMC’s Alan Chartock, President of the Albany branch of the NAACP Debora Brown-Johnson, UAlbany Lecturer in Africana Studies Jennifer Burns, Immigration attorney and Partner with the Albany law firm of Whiteman Osterman & Hanna, Cianna Freeman-Tolbert, and Albany County District Attorney David Soares.

Growing up on Cape Cod in the 1960s, Liza Rodman was a lonely little girl. During the summers, while her mother worked days in a local motel and danced most nights in the Provincetown bars, her babysitter—the kind, handsome handyman at the motel where her mother worked—took her and her sister on adventures in his truck.

He bought them popsicles and together, they visited his “secret garden” in the Truro woods. To Liza, he was one of the few kind and understanding adults in her life. Everyone thought he was just a “great guy.” But there was one thing she didn’t know; their babysitter was a serial killer.

Liza never made the connection between her friendly babysitter and the infamous killer of numerous women, including four in Massachusetts, until decades later. The Babysitter reveals the chilling and unforgettable true story of a charming but brutal psychopath through the eyes of a young girl who once called him her friend.

Liza Rodman and Jennifer Jordan are now telling the story in the new book, "The Babysitter."

Book cover for "The Ravine"
Houghton Mifflin Harcourt

In 2009 Wendy Lower, the acclaimed author of "Hitler’s Furies" was shown a photograph just brought to the United States Holocaust Memorial Museum. The documentation of the Holocaust is vast, but there are virtually no images of a Jewish family at the actual moment of murder, in this case by German officials and Ukrainian collaborators. A Ukrainian shooter’s rifle is inches from a woman's head, obscured in a cloud of smoke. She is bending forward, holding the hand of a barefooted little boy.

And—only one of the shocking revelations of Wendy Lower’s brilliant ten-year investigation of this image—the shins of another child, slipping from the woman’s lap.

The name of the book is "The Ravine: A Family, a Photograph, a Holocaust Massacre Revealed."

Book cover for "This Land Is Their Land"
Bloomsbury Publishing / Bloomsbury Publishing

David J. Silverman is a professor at George Washington University, where he specializes in Native American, Colonial American, and American racial history. He is the author of "Thundersticks," "Red Brethren," "Ninigret," and "Faith and Boundaries."

His new book, "This Land Is Their Land: The Wampanoag Indians, Plymouth Colony, and the Troubled History of Thanksgiving," reveals why some modern Native people hold a Day of Mourning on Thanksgiving, a holiday which celebrates a myth of colonialism and white proprietorship of the United States.

Book cover for "Why Didn't We Riot?"
Penguin/Random House / https://www.penguinrandomhouse.com/

South Carolina–based journalist Issac Bailey joins us to reflect on a wide range of complex, divisive topics—from police brutality and Confederate symbols to respectability politics and white discomfort—which have taken on a fresh urgency with the protest movement sparked by George Floyd’s killing.

Bailey has been honing his views on these issues for the past quarter of a century in his professional and private life, which included an eighteen-year stint as a member of a mostly white Evangelical Christian church.

His new book, “Why Didn’t We Riot? A Black Man in Trumpland,” speaks to and for the millions of Black and Brown people throughout the United States who were effectively pushed back to the back of the bus in the Trump era by a media that prioritized the concerns and feelings of the white working class and an administration that made white supremacists giddy, and explains why the country’s fate in 2020 and beyond is largely in their hands.

Issac Bailey is an award-winning journalist and the James K. Batten Professor of Public Policy at Davidson College.

James Patterson is the world's bestselling author, best known for his many enduring fictional characters and series, including Alex Cross, the Women's Murder Club, Michael Bennett, Maximum Ride, Middle school, I Funny, and Jacky Ha-Ha. He joins us this morning to discuss his latest – "The Coast-to-Coast Murders."

The new thriller tells of a baffling string of murders throughout the country which leads Detective Garrett Dobbs and FBI Agent Jessica Gimble to the family of two Ivy League intellectuals who raised their adopted children in a traumatizing experimental environment.

8/28/20 Panel

Aug 28, 2020
Microphone in radio studio
WAMC / WAMC

  The Roundtable Panel: a daily open discussion of issues in the news and beyond.

Today's panelists are WAMC's Alan Chartock, UAlbany Lecturer in Africana Studies Jennifer Burns, Former EPA Regional Administrator, Visiting Professor at Bennington College, President of Beyond Plastics Judith Enck, and counter-terrorism expert and best-selling author, Malcolm Nance.

In J. Chester Johnson's new book "Damaged Heritage: The Elaine Race Massacre and a Story of Reconciliation" he tells the journey of two Americans - one black and one white. "Damaged Heritage" begins with an account of the 1919 Elaine Race Massacre which, though arguably the worst on record, has been widely unknown for a century due to a white-washing of our history.

Chester Johnson is a poet, essayist, and translator, he served as the Deputy Assistant Secretary of the US Treasury Department under Jimmy Carter.

Rebecca Godfrey is an award-winning novelist and journalist. Her first novel, “The Torn Skirt,” was a national bestseller and a finalist for the Ethel Wilson Fiction Prize.

“Under The Bridge,” Godfrey’s shocking true story of a group of teenagers who savagely beat a classmate to death and then tried to cover up the crime, received one of Canada’s largest literary awards, the British Columbia Award for Canadian Nonfiction, as well as the Arthur Ellis Award for Excellence in Crime Writing. “Under the Bridge” is now available in paperback.

Rebecca Godfrey will talk with author Gary Shteyngart at Oblong Books in Rhinebeck, New York this Saturday at 6 p.m.

This coming Saturday, March 16th the Murderous March 2019 Writers’ & Readers’ Confab, hosted by the Mavens of Mayhem (Sisters in Crime, Upper Hudson chapter) and the East Greenbush Community Library will take place.

The women and men of Mavens of Mayhem, passionate about mystery writing and about equity and diversity in the genre, meet monthly and offers programs for fans and writers.

U.S. best-selling, Canadian author Vicki Delany has been booked to speak. Her keynote address, “Writers and Their Rituals,” will kick things off. Delany will share wisdom on the “Getting Cozy with Murder” panel. Guest speaker Edwin Hill, author and educational publisher, will join Ms Delany in a conversation called, “Breaking and Entering… Into the Field.” Mr. Hill will also join “The Place of Place in Crime Writing.”

Two more panels will offer insights into the field and craft of crime writing: “Conferences, Seminars & Retreats: The Value of Gathering” and “At the Scene of the Crime.” Speakers include Capital Region writers and those traveling from Buffalo, Syracuse, and Hudson, NY, Boston, MA, and Prince Edward County, Ontario, Canada.

We are joined by Frankie Bailey, Rhonda Rosenheck, and, via phone, Vicki Delany.

Nana Kwame Adjei-Brenyah’s first short story collection, “Friday Black,” is a satirical look at what it’s like to be young and black in America, offering surreal tales and dystopian satire about American consumerism and race.

Lisa Unger is the New York Times and internationally bestselling, award-winning author of sixteen novels. Her new release "Under My Skin" was named one of the most anticipated and top thrillers of fall 2018 by BookBub, Bookish, Library Journal, Booklist, PopSugar and CrimeReads.

It’s been a year since Poppy’s husband, Jack, was brutally murdered during his morning run through Manhattan’s Riverside Park. In the immediate aftermath, Poppy spiraled into an oblivion of grief, disappearing for several days only to turn up ragged and confused wearing a tight red dress she didn’t recognize. What happened to Poppy during those lost days? And more importantly, what happened to Jack?

Andre Dubus III’s first novel in a decade, “Gone So Long,” is a story filled with thrilling tension and heartrending empathy.

It tells about a father, estranged for the worst of reasons, driven to seek out the daughter he has not seen in decades - exploring how the wounds of the past afflict the people we become.

Students returned to school today in Ballston Spa, New York after a family of three, including a seventh-grader, died in a double murder-suicide in the Saratoga County community.

In turn-of-the century New York, a mobster rises and his favorite sister struggles between loyalty and life itself. How far will she go when he commits murder?

Flipping the familiar script of “The Sopranos,” “Boardwalk Empire,” and “The Godfather,” “Bittersweet Brooklyn” explores the shattering impact of mob violence on the women expected to mop up the mess.

Winding its way over decades, it is a family saga that plunges readers into a dangerous past - revealed through the perspective of a forgotten yet vibrant woman.

Thelma Adams is the author of the bestselling historical novel “The Last Woman Standing” and “Playdate.” She coproduced the Emmy-winning “Feud: Bette and Joan.” Additionally, she is a prominent film critic – having been the in-house film critic for Us Weekly and the New York Post.

flickr

A woman charged with killing a Connecticut couple and their adult son in what authorities called a botched fake robbery has pleaded not guilty.

Mary Cummings is a writer and historian. She has been awarded by the New York Press Association for her obituary of Joseph Heller and a “Best In-Depth Reporting” Award for “Troubled Waters,” a series on Long 

Island’s threatened groundwater supply. She has written for The New York Times, Newsday, Time Out New York, and more, and was the arts editor and principal feature writer at The Southampton Press.

Her new book is "Saving Sin City: William Travers Jerome, Stanford White, and the Original Crime of the Century."

When Stanford White, one of the most famous architects of the era, whose mark on New York City is second to none, was murdered by Harry K. Thaw in 1906, his death become known as “The Crime of the Century.” But there were other players in this love triangle gone wrong that would play a part in the incredible story of White’s murderer.

Renée Shafransky is a writer and psychotherapist. Her articles and essays have appeared in various publications including the Village Voice, Condé Nast Traveler, and the Southampton Review. She has written screenplays for major motion picture studios and teleplays for HBO and PBS, working with renowned directors such as Harold Ramis. Previously married to actor and writer Spalding Gray, Ms. Shafransky produced the acclaimed film of his monologue, "Swimming to Cambodia," directed by Jonathan Demme.

She joins us to discuss her first novel, a mystery entitled "Tips for Living."

Picture of a judge's gavel
WikiMedia Commons

A second man has admitted guilt in the murder of a man in Mechanicville.

  Despite the outpouring of books, movies, museums, memorials, and courses devoted to the Holocaust, a coherent explanation of why such ghastly carnage erupted from the heart of civilized Europe in the twentieth century still seems elusive even seventy years later. 

Peter Hayes' Why? dispels many misconceptions and answers some of the most basic, yet vexing, questions that remain: why the Jews and not another ethnic group? Why the Germans? Why such a swift and sweeping extermination? Why didn’t more Jews fight back more often? Why didn’t they receive more help?

Peter Hayes is professor of history and German and Theodore Zev Weiss Holocaust Educational Foundation Professor of Holocaust Studies Emeritus at Northwestern University and chair of the Academic Committee of the United States Holocaust Memorial Museum.

Alan Cleaver/Flickr

Investigators remain at an apartment house in Troy, New York where the bodies of four people were found.

Courtesy of the New York State Police

A former day laborer has been arrested in the bludgeoning death of an 83-year-old wife of a millionaire McDonald's franchise owner at their Westchester County hilltop estate nearly two years ago.

Caroline Leavitt’s new novel, Cruel Beautiful World is about coming of age in 1969; about wild love, rebellion, and finding oneself in the time of Woodstock and the Manson murders.

The novel is a haunting, nuanced portrait of love, sisters, and the impossible legacy of family.   

Alexandria Marzano-Lesnevich’s new book, The Fact of a Body: A Murder and a Memoir, is inspired by her time at a law firm in Louisiana working on the retrial defense of death-row convicted murderer and child molester Ricky Langley. She shows how ''the law is more personal than we would like to believe and the truth more complicated, and powerful, than we could ever imagine.''

pixabay.com

A suspect has been charged with killing a woman and young child in Glens Falls early Friday.

In Arsenic & Old Lace, good-hearted drama critic, Mortimer Brewster appears to lead a normal, happy life. Recently engaged to be married, Mortimer plans a trip to visit his charming, spinster aunts, Abby and Martha Brewster. However, shortly after Mortimer’s arrival, he discovers that his innocent aunts have a deadly secret buried in the basement—about a dozen older gentlemen.

Berkshire Theatre Group presents the play, by Joseph Kesselring directed by Gregg Edelman, on the Fitzpatrick Mainstage through August 19th.

The production stars Harriet Harris as Abby, Mia Dillon as Martha, and Graham Rowat at Mortimer.

Colm Tóibín is the author of seven novels, his latest is House of Names. The book is his reimagining of one of the most famous Greek tragedies – the stories of Agamemnon, Clytemnestra, Iphigeneia, Electra, and Orestes.

WAMC file photo

An upstate New York man has pleaded guilty to second-degree murder for the beating death of a 63-year-old woman.

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