murder

Rebecca Godfrey is an award-winning novelist and journalist. Her first novel, “The Torn Skirt,” was a national bestseller and a finalist for the Ethel Wilson Fiction Prize.

“Under The Bridge,” Godfrey’s shocking true story of a group of teenagers who savagely beat a classmate to death and then tried to cover up the crime, received one of Canada’s largest literary awards, the British Columbia Award for Canadian Nonfiction, as well as the Arthur Ellis Award for Excellence in Crime Writing. “Under the Bridge” is now available in paperback.

Rebecca Godfrey will talk with author Gary Shteyngart at Oblong Books in Rhinebeck, New York this Saturday at 6 p.m.

This coming Saturday, March 16th the Murderous March 2019 Writers’ & Readers’ Confab, hosted by the Mavens of Mayhem (Sisters in Crime, Upper Hudson chapter) and the East Greenbush Community Library will take place.

The women and men of Mavens of Mayhem, passionate about mystery writing and about equity and diversity in the genre, meet monthly and offers programs for fans and writers.

U.S. best-selling, Canadian author Vicki Delany has been booked to speak. Her keynote address, “Writers and Their Rituals,” will kick things off. Delany will share wisdom on the “Getting Cozy with Murder” panel. Guest speaker Edwin Hill, author and educational publisher, will join Ms Delany in a conversation called, “Breaking and Entering… Into the Field.” Mr. Hill will also join “The Place of Place in Crime Writing.”

Two more panels will offer insights into the field and craft of crime writing: “Conferences, Seminars & Retreats: The Value of Gathering” and “At the Scene of the Crime.” Speakers include Capital Region writers and those traveling from Buffalo, Syracuse, and Hudson, NY, Boston, MA, and Prince Edward County, Ontario, Canada.

We are joined by Frankie Bailey, Rhonda Rosenheck, and, via phone, Vicki Delany.

Nana Kwame Adjei-Brenyah’s first short story collection, “Friday Black,” is a satirical look at what it’s like to be young and black in America, offering surreal tales and dystopian satire about American consumerism and race.

Lisa Unger is the New York Times and internationally bestselling, award-winning author of sixteen novels. Her new release "Under My Skin" was named one of the most anticipated and top thrillers of fall 2018 by BookBub, Bookish, Library Journal, Booklist, PopSugar and CrimeReads.

It’s been a year since Poppy’s husband, Jack, was brutally murdered during his morning run through Manhattan’s Riverside Park. In the immediate aftermath, Poppy spiraled into an oblivion of grief, disappearing for several days only to turn up ragged and confused wearing a tight red dress she didn’t recognize. What happened to Poppy during those lost days? And more importantly, what happened to Jack?

Andre Dubus III’s first novel in a decade, “Gone So Long,” is a story filled with thrilling tension and heartrending empathy.

It tells about a father, estranged for the worst of reasons, driven to seek out the daughter he has not seen in decades - exploring how the wounds of the past afflict the people we become.

Students returned to school today in Ballston Spa, New York after a family of three, including a seventh-grader, died in a double murder-suicide in the Saratoga County community.

In turn-of-the century New York, a mobster rises and his favorite sister struggles between loyalty and life itself. How far will she go when he commits murder?

Flipping the familiar script of “The Sopranos,” “Boardwalk Empire,” and “The Godfather,” “Bittersweet Brooklyn” explores the shattering impact of mob violence on the women expected to mop up the mess.

Winding its way over decades, it is a family saga that plunges readers into a dangerous past - revealed through the perspective of a forgotten yet vibrant woman.

Thelma Adams is the author of the bestselling historical novel “The Last Woman Standing” and “Playdate.” She coproduced the Emmy-winning “Feud: Bette and Joan.” Additionally, she is a prominent film critic – having been the in-house film critic for Us Weekly and the New York Post.

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A woman charged with killing a Connecticut couple and their adult son in what authorities called a botched fake robbery has pleaded not guilty.

Mary Cummings is a writer and historian. She has been awarded by the New York Press Association for her obituary of Joseph Heller and a “Best In-Depth Reporting” Award for “Troubled Waters,” a series on Long 

Island’s threatened groundwater supply. She has written for The New York Times, Newsday, Time Out New York, and more, and was the arts editor and principal feature writer at The Southampton Press.

Her new book is "Saving Sin City: William Travers Jerome, Stanford White, and the Original Crime of the Century."

When Stanford White, one of the most famous architects of the era, whose mark on New York City is second to none, was murdered by Harry K. Thaw in 1906, his death become known as “The Crime of the Century.” But there were other players in this love triangle gone wrong that would play a part in the incredible story of White’s murderer.

Renée Shafransky is a writer and psychotherapist. Her articles and essays have appeared in various publications including the Village Voice, Condé Nast Traveler, and the Southampton Review. She has written screenplays for major motion picture studios and teleplays for HBO and PBS, working with renowned directors such as Harold Ramis. Previously married to actor and writer Spalding Gray, Ms. Shafransky produced the acclaimed film of his monologue, "Swimming to Cambodia," directed by Jonathan Demme.

She joins us to discuss her first novel, a mystery entitled "Tips for Living."

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A second man has admitted guilt in the murder of a man in Mechanicville.

  Despite the outpouring of books, movies, museums, memorials, and courses devoted to the Holocaust, a coherent explanation of why such ghastly carnage erupted from the heart of civilized Europe in the twentieth century still seems elusive even seventy years later. 

Peter Hayes' Why? dispels many misconceptions and answers some of the most basic, yet vexing, questions that remain: why the Jews and not another ethnic group? Why the Germans? Why such a swift and sweeping extermination? Why didn’t more Jews fight back more often? Why didn’t they receive more help?

Peter Hayes is professor of history and German and Theodore Zev Weiss Holocaust Educational Foundation Professor of Holocaust Studies Emeritus at Northwestern University and chair of the Academic Committee of the United States Holocaust Memorial Museum.

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Investigators remain at an apartment house in Troy, New York where the bodies of four people were found.

Courtesy of the New York State Police

A former day laborer has been arrested in the bludgeoning death of an 83-year-old wife of a millionaire McDonald's franchise owner at their Westchester County hilltop estate nearly two years ago.

Caroline Leavitt’s new novel, Cruel Beautiful World is about coming of age in 1969; about wild love, rebellion, and finding oneself in the time of Woodstock and the Manson murders.

The novel is a haunting, nuanced portrait of love, sisters, and the impossible legacy of family.   

Alexandria Marzano-Lesnevich’s new book, The Fact of a Body: A Murder and a Memoir, is inspired by her time at a law firm in Louisiana working on the retrial defense of death-row convicted murderer and child molester Ricky Langley. She shows how ''the law is more personal than we would like to believe and the truth more complicated, and powerful, than we could ever imagine.''

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A suspect has been charged with killing a woman and young child in Glens Falls early Friday.

In Arsenic & Old Lace, good-hearted drama critic, Mortimer Brewster appears to lead a normal, happy life. Recently engaged to be married, Mortimer plans a trip to visit his charming, spinster aunts, Abby and Martha Brewster. However, shortly after Mortimer’s arrival, he discovers that his innocent aunts have a deadly secret buried in the basement—about a dozen older gentlemen.

Berkshire Theatre Group presents the play, by Joseph Kesselring directed by Gregg Edelman, on the Fitzpatrick Mainstage through August 19th.

The production stars Harriet Harris as Abby, Mia Dillon as Martha, and Graham Rowat at Mortimer.

Colm Tóibín is the author of seven novels, his latest is House of Names. The book is his reimagining of one of the most famous Greek tragedies – the stories of Agamemnon, Clytemnestra, Iphigeneia, Electra, and Orestes.

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An upstate New York man has pleaded guilty to second-degree murder for the beating death of a 63-year-old woman.

In the 1950s, a young Indianapolis minister named Jim Jones preached a curious blend of the gospel and Marxism. His congregation was racially integrated, and he was a much-lauded leader in the contemporary civil rights movement. Eventually, Jones moved his church, Peoples Temple, to northern California. He became involved in electoral politics, and soon was a prominent Bay Area leader.

In The Road to Jonestown: Jim Jones and Peoples Temple, Jeff Guinn examines Jones’s life, from his extramarital affairs, drug use, and fraudulent faith healing to the fraught decision to move almost a thousand of his followers to a settlement in the jungles of Guyana in South America.

In 1991, the police were called to East 72nd St. in Manhattan, where a woman's body had fallen from a twelfth-story window. The woman’s husband, Herbert Weinstein, soon confessed to having hit and strangled his wife after an argument, then dropping her body out of their apartment window to make it look like a suicide. The 65-year-old Weinstein, a quiet, unassuming retired advertising executive, had no criminal record, no history of violent behavior—not even a short temper. How, then, to explain this horrific act?
 
Journalist Kevin Davis uses the perplexing story of the Weinstein murder to present a riveting, deeply researched exploration of the intersection of neuroscience and criminal justice. Shortly after Weinstein was arrested, an MRI revealed a cyst the size of an orange on his brain’s frontal lobe, the part of the brain that governs judgment and impulse control. Weinstein’s lawyer seized on that discovery, arguing that the cyst had impaired Weinstein’s judgment and that he should not be held criminally responsible for the murder. It was the first case in the United States in which a judge allowed a scan showing a defendant’s brain activity to be admitted as evidence to support a claim of innocence.

Kevin Davis' new book is The Brain Defense: Murder in Manhattan and the Dawn of Neuroscience in America's Courtrooms.

In September 1998, Claudia Rowe was a young reporter working as a stringer for the New York Times in Poughkeepsie, New York when local police, confounded by two years of missing-women reports, discovered eight decayed bodies stashed in the home where Kendall Francois lived with his mother, father and teenage sister.

The corpses were found only after Kendall, a polite twenty-seven-year-old, confessed while being booked for something far more routine. He fit few traditional descriptions of a serial murderer, and many in Poughkeepsie struggled to comprehend how this “gentle giant” could be responsible for such brutality.

Reaching out after Kendall’s arrest, Rowe began an intense four-year conversation with the killer through letters, phone calls and face-to-face meetings. Rowe writes about this in her new book, The Spider And The Fly: A Reporter, A Serial Killer, And The Meaning Of Murder.

Claudia Rowe is a staff writer at The Seattle Times and has twice been nominated for the Pulitzer Prize. 

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A fourth suspect has been arrested in connection with the killing of an upstate New York man whose roommate also was found slain last week.

WAMC photo by Dave Lucas

Three men are being held in Virginia in connection with two bodies found a day apart in Rensselear County.

Bette Gordon is a director and independent filmmaker best known for her film Variety (1984), Luminous Motion (2000), and Handsome Harry (2010) Toronto. She has been the subject of retrospectives at IFC Cinema, Anthology Film Archives and The Walker Art Center.

Josh Charles is an actor best known for his work in Dead Poets Society, Sports Night, and The Good Wife.

They join us to discuss their new film The Drowning, directed by Gordon and starring Charles along with Julia Styles, and Avan Jogia. The thriller will screen twice at this year's Woodstock Film Festival

Police in Vermont say a dispute between separate homeless encampments preceded the fatal beating of a transgender man.

  Elizabeth Brundage is the author of the novels A Stranger Like You, Somebody Else's Daughter, and The Doctor's Wife.

Her latest is All Things Cease to Appear, where late on winter afternoon in upstate, New York, George Clare comes home to find his wife murdered and their three-year-old daughter alone in her room across the hall. The novel is a complex portrait of a psychopath and a marriage.

Sharon Tate: A Life

Feb 18, 2016

  Ed Sanders gave readers their clearest insight yet into the disturbing world of Charles Manson and his followers when he published The Family in 1971.

Continuing that journalistic tradition in his new book, Sharon Tate: A Life, Sanders presents the most thorough look ever into the heartbreaking story of Sharon Tate, the iconic actress who found love, fame, and ultimately tragedy during her all-too-brief life.

  Experts in end-of-life care tell us that we should talk about death and dying with relatives and friends, but how do we get such conversations off the ground in a society that historically has avoided the topic?

In Let's Talk About Death: Asking the Questions that Profoundly Change the Way We Live and Die, Steve Gordon and Irene Kacandes share the results of a no-holds-barred discussion they conducted for several years over email.

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