Employment | WAMC

Employment

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    Our Falling into Place series spotlights the important work of -and fosters collaboration between- not-for-profit organizations in our communities; allowing us all to fall into place.

Falling Into Place is supported by The Seymour Fox Memorial Foundation, Providing a helping hand to turn inspiration into accomplishment. See more possibilities … see more promise… see more progress.

This morning we focus on AIM Services, Inc. and welcome Executive Director Chris Lyons.

Lengthening hours, lessening pay, no parental leave, scant job security: never have so many workers needed so much support. Yet, the very labor unions that could garner protections and help workers speak up for themselves are growing weaker every day and an age of rampant inequality of increasing social protests and strikes.

When a majority of workers say they want to be union members, why does the union density continue to decline? Shaun Richman offers some answers in his new book, "Tell the Bosses We're Coming: A New Action Plan for Workers in the 21st Century."

Shaun Richman has spent a decade and a half as a union organizer and representative.

Alaant

A new survey finds the COVID-19 pandemic hasn't stopped Capital Region companies from hiring new employees, but the pace of hiring has slowed and employers’ expectations for the future are uncertain.

The economy has been brutal to American workers for several decades. The promise at the heart of the American Dream is withering away. While onlookers assume those suffering in marginalized working-class communities will instinctively rise up, the 2016 election threw into sharp relief how little we know about how the working-class translate their grievances into politics.

In "We're Still Here: We're Still Here: Pain and Politics in the Heart of America," Jennifer M. Silva tells a deep, multi-generational story of pain, place, and politics that will endure long after the Trump administration. Drawing on over 100 interviews with black, white, and Latino working-class residents of a declining coal town in Pennsylvania, Silva reveals how the decline of the American Dream is lived and felt.

Jennifer M. Silva is an Assistant Professor in the O'Neill School of Public and Environmental Affairs at Indiana University in Bloomington.

Jonathan M. Metzl is the Frederick B. Rentschler II professor of sociology and psychiatry at Vanderbilt University and director of its Center for Medicine, Health, and Society. He is the author of several books and a prominent expert on gun violence and mental illness.

taxcredits.net

There is a widening income gap in the Hudson Valley despite growth in wages and employment. That’s according to a report released Monday by the Marist Bureau of Economic Research.

Families today are squeezed on every side from high childcare costs and harsh employment policies to workplaces without paid family leave or even dependable and regular working hours. Many realize that attaining the standard of living their parents managed has become impossible.

In her book, "Squeezed: Why Our Families Can't Afford America," Alissa Quart, executive editor of the Economic Hardship Reporting Project, examines the lives of many middle-class Americans who can now barely afford to raise children. She shows how our country has failed its families. Her subjects, from professors to lawyers to caregivers to nurses, have been wrung out by a system that doesn’t support them, and enriches only a tiny elite.

From the beet fields of North Dakota to the National Forest campgrounds of California to Amazon’s CamperForce program in Texas, employers have discovered a new, low-cost labor pool, made up largely of transient older Americans. Finding that social security comes up short, often underwater on mortgages, these invisible casualties of the Great Recession have taken to the road by the tens of thousands in late-model RVs, travel trailers, and vans, forming a growing community of nomads: migrant laborers who call themselves “workampers.”

On frequently traveled routes between seasonal jobs, Jessica Bruder meets people from all walks of life: a former professor, a McDonald’s vice president, a minister, a college administrator, and a motorcycle cop, among many others―including her irrepressible protagonist, a onetime cocktail waitress, Home Depot clerk, and general contractor named Linda May.

Jessica Bruder is a journalist who reports on subcultures and economic justice. Her newest book is Nomadland: Surviving America in the Twenty-First Century

Cathy N. Davidson is a lifelong educational innovator - and instigator. After twenty-five years as a professor and an administrator leading innovation at Duke University, Davidson moved to CUNY in August 2014 to direct the Futures Initiative at the Graduate Center. Appointed by President Obama to the National Council on the Humanities (2011-2017), she also sits on the Board of Directors of Mozilla. 

In her new book, The New Education, Davidson argues that the current approach to education is wholly unsuited to the era of the gig economy. Our system of higher education dates to the period from 1865 to 1925, when the nation's new universities created grades and departments, majors and minors, in an attempt to prepare young people for a world transformed by the telegraph and the Model T. From the Ivy League to community colleges, she introduces us to innovators who are remaking college for our own time by emphasizing student-centered learning that values creativity in the face of change above all. 

Thomas A. Kochan, is the George M. Bunker Professor of Work and Employment Relations at MIT's Sloan School of Management and Co-Director of the MIT Institute for Work and Employment Research.

"Shaping the Future of Work" lays out a comprehensive strategy for changing the course the American economy and employment system have been on for the past 30 years. The goal is to create more productive businesses that also provide good jobs and careers and by doing so build a more inclusive economy and broadly shared prosperity. This will require workers to acquire new sources of bargaining power and for business, labor, government, and educators to work together to meet the challenges and opportunities facing the next generation workforce.

Congresswoman Elise Stefanik meets with Workforce Development Board
Pat Bradley/WAMC

New York Congresswoman Elise Stefanik held a workforce forum with local business leaders on Monday.  Their key message is more funding is needed for worker training.

Rick Wartzman is director of the KH Moon Center for a Functioning Society at the Drucker Institute, a part of Claremont Graduate University. He also writes about the world of work for Fortune magazine online. Before joining the Drucker Institute in 2007 as its founding executive director, Rick worked for two decades as a reporter, editor and columnist at The Wall Street Journal and Los Angeles Times.

In his new book, The End of Loyalty: The Rise and Fall of Good Jobs in America, Wartzman chronicles the erosion of the relationship between American companies and their workers. Through the stories of four major employers--General Motors, General Electric, Kodak, and Coca-Cola--he shows how big businesses once took responsibility for providing their workers and retirees with an array of social benefits.

Kellogg's

More than 300 jobs will be lost in the Kellogg Co.'s previously announced plans to close its New York facilities.

In How May I Help You?: An Immigrant's Journey from MBA to Minimum Wage, Deepak Singh chronicles his downward mobility as an immigrant to a small town in Virginia. Armed with an MBA from India, Singh can get only a minimum-wage job in an electronics store. Every day he confronts unfamiliar American mores, from strange idioms to deeply entrenched racism.

Our Falling into Place series spotlights the important work of -and fosters collaboration between- not-for-profit organizations in our communities; allowing us all to fall into place.

Falling Into Place is supported by The Seymour Fox Memorial Foundation, Providing a helping hand to turn inspiration into accomplishment. See more possibilities … see more promise… see more progress.

Malissa Pilette-McClenon - Director of Development and Marketing - YWCA of the Greater Capital Region to discuss the Jamison-Rounds Ready for Work Program – designed to help underprivileged women find and keep employment and/or pursue education. 

The Bureau Of Labor Statistics says the unemployment rate in this country is hovering around five percent—currently at 4.9. That’s roughly half of what it was during the Great Recession and holding steady since August 2015. So we’re doing pretty well now, the jobs are out there. You just have to get them.

Our Falling into Place series spotlights the important work of -and fosters collaboration between- not-for-profit organizations in our communities; allowing us all to fall into place.

Falling Into Place is supported by The Seymour Fox Memorial Foundation, Providing a helping hand to turn inspiration into accomplishment. See more possibilities … see more promise… see more progress.

This morning we focus on the Capital District Women’s Employment & Resource Center (WERC.)   Our guests are: Elizabeth Miller, Executive Director of WERC; Tracy L. Bullett, Esq., who is on the WERC Board of Directors; and Melissa Lape Intake Specialist for WERC and WERC Graduate.

aclu

Do you have a criminal record? That can be a daunting question for a job seeker. Some Albany County legislators are taking steps to eliminate that query from county job application forms.

WAMC file photo

New York auditors say Empire State Development Corp., which provides millions of dollars in tax credits to companies that promise to expand and add jobs, has been unable to verify that many companies met their obligations.

A bill that bars employers from asking about a person’s criminal history on a job application form has become law in Vermont.

WAMC photo by Dave Lucas

In the heart of "Tech Valley," a new survey is out showing Capital Region employers are having difficulty finding high-tech workers.

  Our Falling into Place series spotlights the important work of -and fosters collaboration between- not-for-profit organizations in our communities; allowing us all to fall into place.

Falling Into Place is supported by The Seymour Fox Memorial Foundation. Providing a helping hand to turn inspiration into accomplishment. See more possibilities … see more promise… see more progress.

Our Ability Alliance dual goals are to inspire those individuals with disabilities to achieve their dreams through education and employment as well as to educate able-bodied individuals about the differences in ability around us. The group’s mission is to build a coalition among businesses in New York State interested in both hiring - and building supplier diversity of businesses owned by - individuals with disabilities.

This morning, we welcome John Robinson, Executive Director of Our Ability Alliance.

  60 Seconds And You’re Hired! has already helped thousands of job seekers get their dream jobs by excelling in crucial interviews.

Top job search expert Robin Ryan draws on her 20 years as a career counselor, 30 years of direct hiring, and extensive contact with hundreds of recruiters, decisions makers, and HR professionals to teach you strategies to help you take charge of the interview process and get the job you want.

Pat Bradley/WAMC

Although the unemployment rate in New York’s North Country remains above the statewide average, businesses are hiring.  In Plattsburgh this afternoon dozens of companies have been participating in a job fair seeking qualified employees.

  It’s the American dream: get a good education, work hard, buy a house, and achieve prosperity and success. But, according to our next guest, during the last twenty-five years we have seen a disturbing “opportunity gap” emerge.

Harvard University Public Policy Professor, Robert Putnam, says Americans have believed in the idea that all kids, regardless of their family background, should have a decent chance to improve their lot in life. Putnam says this central tenet of the American dream seems no longer true or at the least, much less true than it was.

His new book is: Our Kids: The American Dream in Crisis. Robert Putnam is the Peter and Isabel Malkin Professor of Public Policy at Harvard University. Nationally honored as a leading humanist and a renowned scientist, he has written fourteen books and has consulted for the last four US Presidents.

NASA

The rising global financial tide appears to be brushing the shores of upstate New York's economy.

Gasoline at local pumps is under $2.50 a gallon as global oil prices bottom out. The price of milk is down in some stores. Early in 2015, things appear to be looking bright for people's finances.

Congresswoman Elizabeth Esty
Congresswoman Elizabeth Esty

  The Newtown massacre is as raw today as it was two years ago.

In today’s Congressional Corner, Connecticut Representative Elizabeth Esty tells WAMC’s Alan Chartock that Sandy Hook was only the beginning.

Although U.S. businesses added fewer jobs than expected in August,  one expert says the fall jobs outlook for the Albany area is promising.

Reflecting the August lull in the national market, Capital Region weekly job postings were 1821 compared to 2480 the week before. NextAct of Colonie's Dan Moran believes the market is about to get more competitive

A new analysis measures the health of the economy: the report offers an optimistic outlook for the next two years.

    

  Today 4.7 million Americans have been unemployed for more than six months. In France more than ten percent of the working population is without work. In Israel it’s above seven percent. And in Greece and Spain, that number approaches thirty percent. Across the developed world, the experience of unemployment has become frighteningly common—and so are the seemingly endless tactics that job seekers employ in their quest for new work.

Flawed System/Flawed Self delves beneath these staggering numbers to explore the world of job searching and unemployment across class and nation.

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