Free Speech

"The First: How to Think About Hate Speech, Campus Speech, Religious Speech, Fake News, Post-Truth, and Donald Trump" is a new book from public intellectual and New York Times bestselling author, Stanley Fish.

How does the First Amendment really work? Is it a principle or a value? What is hate speech and should it always be banned? Are we free to declare our religious beliefs in the public square? What role, if any, should companies like Facebook play in policing the exchange of thoughts, ideas, and opinions?

Stanley Fish, “America’s most famous professor” (BookPage), explores these complex questions in "The First."

P. E. Moskowitz is the author of "How to Kill a City." A former staff writer for Al Jazeera America, they have written for publications including the Guardian, New York Times, NewYorker.com, New Republic, Wired, Slate, Buzzfeed, Splinter, and Vice.

Their most recent book is "The Case Against Free Speech: The First Amendment, Fascism, and the Future of Dissent."

Ulrich Baer was educated at Harvard and Yale and has been awarded John Simon Guggenheim, DAAD, Paul Getty, and Alexander von Humboldt Fellowships. He is University Professor at New York University. His podcast, "Think About It," is devoted to in-depth conversations on powerful ideas, including freedom of speech, and language that changes the world.

His new book is "What Snowflakes Get Right: Free Speech, Truth, and Equality on Campus." It is published by Oxford University Press.

WAMC

Municipalities in Massachusetts are being urged to review their ordinances that regulate signs.

As the president of the student group Uncomfortable Learning at Williams College, Zachary Wood knows all about intellectual controversy. From John Derbyshire to Charles Murray, there's no one Zach refuses to debate or engage with simply because he disagrees with their beliefs and this controversial view has given him a unique platform on college campuses and in the media.

But Zach has never shared the details of his own personal story, and how he came to be a crusader for open dialogue and free speech. In "Uncensored," he reveals for the first time how he grew up poor and black in Washington, DC, in an environment where the only way to survive was to resist the urge to write people off because of their backgrounds and their perspectives.

    Joe Donahue speaks with Chris Kluwe (author, gamer, nerd - and football player) about his book, Beautifully Unique Sparkleponies: On Myths, Morons, Free Speech, Football, and Assorted Absurdities.

    

  Since 1971, when the Pentagon Papers were leaked to the New York Times and furious debate over First Amendment rights ensued, free-speech cases have emerged in rapid succession.

Floyd Abrams has been on the front lines of nearly every one of these major cases, which is also to say that, more than any other person, he has forged this country’s legal understanding of free speech.

Vermont Health Department officials have rewritten rules designed to implement a new law on childhood immunizations, but some parents aren't satisfied with how those changes are being made.

An earlier draft of the rules said when parents want to exempt their child from vaccinations they need to sign a form implying they agree with the Health Department's assessment of the vaccines' risks and benefits. Parents who have expressed skepticism about vaccines say that's compelled speech, and that it violates the First Amendment.