bias | WAMC

bias

Albany Police Chief Eric Hawkins
WAMC photo by Dave Lucas

An Albany police officer caught on camera making racially charged statements will be terminated.

Vermont Governor Phil Scott began his latest COVID-19 briefing Wednesday by telling Vermonters that he will not tolerate any hate, bigotry or bias in the state as a result of the coronavirus pandemic.

Governor Phil Scott began his Wednesday COVID-19 briefing telling Vermonters that he will not tolerate any hate, bigotry or bias in the state as a result of the pandemic.

Dr. Jennifer Eberhardt’s new book, “Biased: Uncovering the Hidden Prejudice That Shapes What We See, Think, and Do,” is a ground-breaking book that demonstrates how our unconscious biases powerfully shape our behavior.

Using scientific research and powerful personal stories, Dr. Eberhardt reveals that all people are vulnerable to racial bias, even if they are not racist. She presents her often shocking research and data, demonstrating how racial bias can contribute to stark disparities between social groups from the classroom to the courtroom to the boardroom.

But the potential for bias is present in all of us, and it is vital to understand how bias works in order to begin to correct its devastating effects in our society.

Dr. Jennifer Eberhardt is a professor of psychology at Stanford and a recipient of a 2014 MacArthur “genius” grant. She is co-founder and co-director of SPARQ (Social Psychological Answers to Real-World Questions), a Stanford Center that brings together researchers and practitioners to address significant social problems.

Bias against women at work, bias against people of color in the criminal justice system, bias against the LGBT community at the marriage license desk, the news story about the many ways bias, unconscious or otherwise rears its head in American society keep piling up. It is easy to see the latest headlines shake our heads and feel like there is nothing we can do about it.

Enter NYU professor and social psychologist Dolly Chugh, who's new book "The Person You Mean To Be: How Good People Fight Bias" offers a message for anyone who wants to help build a more equal and just society for everyone, but does not know where to start. Dr. Dolly Chugh is a Harvard educated, award-winning social psychologist at the NYU Stern School Of Business. She Joins us Today.

Joe Feldman has worked in education at the local and national levels for over 20 years in both charter and district school contexts, as a teacher, principal, and district administrator. He began his career as a high school English and American History teacher in Atlanta Public Schools and was the founding principal of a charter high school in Washington, DC. He has been the Director of Charter Schools for New York City Department of Education, the Director of K-12 Instruction in Union City, California, and was a Fellow to the Chief of Staff for U.S. Secretary of Education Richard Riley. Joe is currently CEO of Crescendo Education Group, a consulting organization that partners with school and districts to help teachers use improved and more equitable grading and assessment practices.

In his book, "Grading for Equity," Feldman takes a look at inconsistent grading practices and the ways they can inadvertently perpetuate the achievement and opportunity gaps among our students.

  Gender equality is a moral and a business imperative. But unconscious bias holds us back, and de-biasing people’s minds has proven to be difficult and expensive. Diversity training programs have had limited success, and individual effort alone often invites backlash. Behavioral design offers a new solution. By de-biasing organizations instead of individuals, we can make smart changes that have big impacts.

Presenting research-based solutions, Iris Bohnet hands us the tools we need to move the needle in classrooms and boardrooms, in hiring and promotion, benefiting businesses, governments, and the lives of millions. Her book is What Works: Gender Equality by Design.

    Psychologist from the University of Washington, Anthony Greenwald, joins us to discuss the hidden biases we all carry from a lifetime of exposure to cultural attitudes about age, gender, race, ethnicity, religion, social class, sexuality, disability status, and nationality.