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Gov. Hochul, LG Delgado projected to win New York Democratic Party primary; Rep. Zeldin takes four-way GOP race

women

  • “We Got the Beat – A Women in Music Summit” will bring together creatives and music lovers for three days of concerts, panels, screenings, and conversation at Woodstock, New York’s historic Bearsville Theater, March 25-27th. The event is an immersive weekend covering every aspect of the contributions made by women to the world of music. We’ll talk with producers Lizzie Vann – owner of the Bearsville Theatre - and music journalist Holly George-Warren to get a preview.
  • Mary Ann Sieghart spent 20 years as Assistant Editor and columnist at The Times and won a large following for her columns on politics, economics, feminism, parenthood and life in general. She has presented many programs on BBC Radio 4 and chaired the revival of The Brains Trust on BBC2. She recently spent a year as a Visiting Fellow of All Souls College, Oxford. She has chaired the Social Market Foundation think tank, is a Visiting Professor at King’s College London, and sits on numerous boards. She is Chair of the judges for the Women’s Prize for Fiction 2022.Sieghart’s new book “The Authority Gap: Why Women are Still Taken Less Seriously than Men, and What We Can Do About it” provides a startling perspective on the unseen bias at work in our everyday lives. Drawing on a wealth of data with precision and insight, the book is a fresh feminist take on how to address and counteract systemic sexism in ways that benefit us all.
  • Isabel Allende’s new novel “Violeta” is a sweeping epic that tells the story of a woman whose life spans one hundred years from 1920–2020 as she bears witness to the greatest upheavals of the twentieth century. Allende won worldwide acclaim in 1982 with the publication of her first novel, “The House of the Spirits.”
  • Isabel Allende’s new novel “Violeta” is a sweeping epic that tells the story of a woman whose life spans one hundred years from 1920–2020 as she bears witness to the greatest upheavals of the twentieth century. Allende won worldwide acclaim in 1982 with the publication of her first novel, “The House of the Spirits.”
  • New Yorker Cartoonist Liza Donnelly joins us to tell us about her new book, "Very Funny Ladies: The New Yorker's Women Cartoonists" (Prometheus) and the online event she will be having tomorrow night through Oblong Books at 7PM. Donnelly offers a unique slant on 20th-century and early 21st-century America through the humorous perspectives of the talented women of The New Yorker. Donnelly will be joined by fellow "very funny ladies" Roz Chast, Kim Warp, and Kendra Allenby - all talented women cartoonists who have successfully captured in pictures and captions many of the key social issues of their time.
  • The new book - "Let’s Get Physical: How Women Discovered Exercise and Reshaped the World" is a blend of reportage and personal narrative that explores the untold history of women’s exercise culture by author and award winning journalist Danielle Friedman.
  • In "Intentioning: Sex, Power, Pandemics, and How Women Will Take The Lead for (Everyone’s) Good," Gloria Feldt inspires diverse women to embrace their personal power to lead with intention, confidence, and joy. It comes as no surprise to her that women flexed their formidable muscles when needed most, representing a disproportionate number of essential workers during the darkest days of the coronavirus global outbreak and leading the charge against racism in the United States. But this book is decidedly about the future, taking the leadership lessons learned from this disruption and creating a better world for all.
  • Lauren Groff is a two time National Book Award finalist and a New York Times bestselling author. Her latest "Matrix," her first since the groundbreaking "Fates and Furies," brings us to a 12th century nunnery where she tells an engrossing tale of female desire, passion, creativity, and power.
  • The term “home economics” may conjure traumatic memories of lopsided hand-sewn pillows or sunken muffins. But common conception obscures the story of the revolutionary science of better living. The field exploded opportunities for women in the twentieth century by reducing domestic work and providing jobs as professors, engineers, chemists, and businesspeople. And it has something to teach us today.