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Person Place Thing

Person Place Thing

  • In 1928 antimatter was discovered by Paul Dirac and was confirmed real seven years later. We find ourselves in a matter dominated universe. Tune in to hear why the tranquility of space, in reality, is not so tranquil, and about positrons.
  • Len Elmore was on the Knicks during the playoffs: “We’re playing the Celtics, and I get this letter, and I was accepted.” To Harvard Law. Elmore also talks about College Park, Md. and more basketball.
  • President of the Brooklyn Botanic Garden Adrian Benepe is proud that it is a treasure for the entire city and even prouder of its ties to its local community: “The neighborhood is deep into us, and we’re deep into the neighborhood.” Benepe tells us about Gordon Davis, a cove along the Hudson and a child’s rake.
  • Conductor Ian Niederhoffer says “Music has the unique power to transport its audiences to a time that no longer exists.”
  • Writer David Leonhardt of “The Morning” newsletter for “The New York Times” and author of “Ours Was the Shining Future” admires A. Philip Randolph, who personified this idea: “Collective action around labor and workers is the most powerful vehicle for changing this country.”
  • Right now we’re seeing the waning moon, the moon lit up on its left side. When you notice a moon in the blue sky in the morning, that's always the waning moon. And speaking of day sky, though it surprises a lot of people, the moon appears in the daytime just as much as it’s out at night. Tune in to see where the moon is located in the sky.
  • Journalist Joan Kron has covered plastic surgery for decades: “I believe everybody is free to do what they want with their body.” Incidentally, she’s just turned 96 and looks fabulous.
  • Former Manhattan borough historian Michael Miscione admires the enormously accomplished, nearly forgotten, 19th century New Yorker, Andrew H. Green: “He is often compared to Robert Moses. In a favorable way.” Miscione also talks to us about his high school and an alligator.
  • As a young actor Peter Riegert (Local Hero, Crossing Delancey, Animal House) played Goldberg in The Birthday Party, overseen by Harold Pinter himself. One speech was particularly opaque. “I had no idea what it meant, but to say these words was to be Isaac Stern on the violin.” Learning to trust the writer
  • Interior designer Kia Weatherspoon has worked on many low-income housing projects. Sometimes her clients resist: “You’re making it too nice for these people; these people will tear it up.” Bringing good design to “these people.”
  • Israeli-American architect Eran Chen likes buildings, of course, but it’s the spaces between buildings that he loves. “It’s a blur between public and private, it’s a stage, it’s sort of an in-between territory, a threshold to the city, a place of in-between.”
  • Some architects want their buildings to endure unchanged forever, but partners Marion Weiss and Michael Manfredi welcome eventual repurposing. “Hopefully, our La Brea Museum, 100 years from now, will be appropriated by somebody else.” Weiss and Manfredi talk to us about Romaldo Giurgola, La Brea Tar Pits and a Roman paving stonean.