gallery

Frelinghuysen Morris House And Studio - Stairway
frelinghuysen.org

George L. K. Morris and Suzy Frelinghuysen, prolific abstract artists since the late 1930s, were a remarkable couple at the leading edge of the national and international art scene. Collectors and intellectuals, they created a Berkshire home that reflected their aesthetic worlds.

Upon her death in 1988, Suzy Frelinghuysen left instructions that the House & Studio and art collection be used for an educational purpose. The House & Studio opened for visitation in 1998.

Visitors can walk through the House with all of its original furnishings and view not only the works of Morris and Frelinghuysen on the walls, but walk right up to the works of some of their more famous colleagues and contemporaries including Picasso, Braque, Leger and Gris.

Kinney Frelinghuysen is the Director of the Frelinghuysen Morris House & Studio in Lenox, Mass.

Shawn Stone joins us to talk about what he's seen lately and what cultural events are coming up this week in our region.

Seen: "The Spy Who Dumped Me"

Upcoming:

  • "Annie" - Mac-Haydn Theatre, Chatham, opens Thursday 8/23 at 2 and 8 PM; through Sept. 2
  • Blue Öyster Cult - Empire State Plaza, Albany, Thursday 8/23, 5:30-8:30 PM
  • Dick Dale - Iron Horse Music Hall, Northampton, Thursday 8/23, 7 PM
  • The Blasters - Hangar On the Hudson, Troy, Friday 8/24, 8 PM
  • The Wailin’ Jennys - Calvin Theatre, Northampton, Saturday 8/25, 8 PM - The Egg, Albany, Sunday 8/26, 7:30 PM
  • Crystal Clear Acoustic Concert Series: House Sparrow - Thomas Schutte installation at Stone Hill, Clark Art Institute, Williamstown, Sunday 8/26, noon-2 PM
  • Borromeo String Quartet; music of Mozart, Bach, Mendelssohn, Ned Rorem - Maverick Concerts, Woodstock, Sunday 8/26, 4 PM
  • "Guardians of the Galaxy" - Outside the Times Union Center, Albany, Monday 8/27, 6:30 preshow/7:30 movie
  • "Sharon Bates: Exhibit B" - Opalka Gallery, Sage Colleges, Albany, opens Tuesday 8/28 through Oct. 13; opening reception Sept. 7

New movies: "Operation Finale," "Papillon," "Skate Kitchen," "The Happytime Murders"

The Clark Art Institute’s summer 2018 exhibition, “Women Artists in Paris, 1850–1900,” celebrates an international group of artists who overcame gender-based restrictions to make extraordinary creative strides, taking important steps in the fight for a more egalitarian art world. It is on view in Williamstown through September 3.

In addition to “Women Artists in Paris,” The Clark is the exclusive venue for the exhibition “The Art of Iron: Objects from the Musée Le Secq des Tournelles, Rouen, Normandy.” The exhibition presents thirty-six historic objects in an installation celebrating the craft and beauty of wrought iron. That exhibition is on view through September 16th.

(Left) Grille, Italian, 18th century. Wrought iron, polychromed, 33 7/8 x 25 5/8 x 1 5/8 in. Réunion des Musées Métropolitains, Rouen, Normandy, LS.4513 (Right) Circular Grille, French (Amiens), c. 1700. Wrought iron and rolled iron, cut and embossed, 39 3/8 diameter x 2 3/4 in. Réunion des Musées Métropolitains, Rouen, Normandy, LS.4231 Edit | Remove

Each July and August the Williams College Museum of Art (WCMA) produces a public program series that offers a playful taste of the academic experience. This summer the series titled "Ologies" is digging into some of the quirkiest fields of study.

Also on WCMA’s summer agenda is the exhibition “Dance We Must: Treasures from Jacob’s Pillow, 1906-1940” which explores the contributions of Jacob's Pillow founder Ted Shawn and the iconic Ruth St. Denis to American modern dance.

Gathering over 350 materials, the exhibition contextualizes the pioneering work of Shawn and St. Denis within the scope of American art history through artifacts that have never been seen before.

This morning we learn about The Artful Mind Gallery in Lenox, Massachusettes which opened last month and showcases an enthusiastic and fine-tuned professional and passionate group of seventeen artists. The curator at large, Harryet Puritzman, is also the publisher of the well-known 26-year old magazine for the arts, The Artful Mind.

She now wants to give a gift back to artists whose work she’s admired and has been inspired by over the years.

The gallery includes the world of oils, acrylic, mixed media, photography, and sculpture - on view in the front window, throughout the interior space and in the back garden. Harryet Puritzman and Janet Pumphrey join us.

Rockwell Kent was a writer, illustrator, printmaker, painter, ceramicist, adventurer, and more who traveled to remote destinations around the world. He settled down in the Adirondacks and was a controversial figure, accused of being a socialist during the McCarthy era, but managed a successful art career in metropolitan areas despite living in the North Country.

The Hyde Collection in Glens Falls, New York currently has two Kent exhibitions on view: "The Prints of Rockwell Kent: Selections from the Ralf C. Nemec Collection" which features fifty-four images from the largest collection of Kent prints in the world. It also includes a selection of rare ceramics by Kent. The second exhibit is: "A Life and Art of His Own: The Paintings of Rockwell Kent from North Country Collections," a collection of paintings organized by Adirondack Experience director emerita Caroline Welsh, drawn from the SUNY Plattsburgh Art Museum and private collections.

The exhibits are on view through July 22nd. The Hyde’s Director of Curatorial Affairs and Programming Jonathan Canning joins us.

Uncle Andy Paints a Soup Can 2003 Illustration for Uncle Andy’s: A Faabbbulous Visit with Andy Warhol by James Warhola, Picture Puffin Books Watercolor and pencil on paper Collection of the artist
James Warhola

Inventing America: Rockwell and Warhol is the first exhibition linking Norman Rockwell and Andy Warhol, two iconic visual communicators who embraced populism, shaped national identity, and opened new ways of seeing in twentieth century America.

Original iconic artworks; process materials and studies; archival photography, manuscripts, and documents; film/video footage; and props, costumes, and personal artifacts are all on view at the Norman Rockwell Museum in Stockbridge, MA.

And there is also the special compendium exhibition by Warhol’s nephew: James Warhola: Uncle Andy And Other Stories. Both exhibits are on display through October 29th. James Warhola is with us this morning along with curators Stephanie Plunkett and Jesse Kowalski.


  The exhibition, An Inner World: Seventeenth-Century Dutch Genre Painting at The Clark in Williamstown, MA features seven genre paintings by Dutch artists working in or near the city of Leiden in the seventeenth century. Genre paintings, or scenes that take everyday life as their subject matter, flourished in the Dutch Republic in this period.

 

Based around The Clark’s own Girl at a Window by Gerrit Dou, the exhibition is scheduled to be on display through October 1st. We went to the museum recently and spoke with Alexis Goodin, Co-Curator and Curatorial Research Assistant at The Clark.

The new exhibit - Face Them - at the Lichtenstein Gallery for the Arts in Pittsfield, MA opens June 2nd and will be up through June 24th.

Face Them is an opportunity to gather artistic intelligence through several mediums in one gallery. By placing pertinent topic images of today before the viewer that may make one feel moved not of our imagination, but of our reality.

The topics are big ones: Global Warming, Population Explosion, Gun Control, Human Trafficking, and Animal Abuse.

To tell us more – we welcome National Geographic Photographer John Stanmeyer and Barbara Arpante – Curator of Face Them and a Collage Artist.

Photograph of a portion of Tanja Hollander's "Are You Really My Friend?" at MASS MoCA
MASS MoCA's Instagram


  How often do you get a friend request on Facebook from someone whose name you don’t recognize? You have mutual friends. You check those names -- and then you aren’t sure exactly who some of those people are either - or how you know them. Imagine telling someone 15 years ago that you have friends you don’t know -- and not in that “a stranger is a just a friend you haven’t met yet” optimistic way.

Tanja Hollander’s new exhibition Are You Really My Friend? is currently on view at MASS MoCA in North Adams, MA. The show explores, through portraits and paraphernalia, what friendship means to Tanja and what friendship means today - in the age of social media and easy surface relationships. She set out to connect with and photograph her 626 Facebook friends.

I spoke with Tanja and curator Denise Markonish at the museum recently and began by asking Tanja when and where she had the idea for the project.

Kenneth Clark's thirteen-part 1969 television series, Civilisation, established him as a globally admired figure. Clark was prescient in making this series: the upheavals of the century, the Cold War among others, convinced him of the power of barbarism and the fragility of culture. He would burnish his image with two memoirs that artfully omitted the more complicated details of his life.

Now, drawing on a vast, previously unseen archive, James Stourton reveals the formidable intellect and the private man behind the figure who effortlessly dominated the art world for more than half a century: his privileged upbringing, his interest in art history beginning at Oxford, his remarkable early successes.

At 27 he was keeper of Western Art at the Ashmolean in Oxford and at 29, the youngest director of The National Gallery. During the war he arranged for its entire collection to be hidden in slate mines in Wales and organized packed concerts of classical music at the Gallery to keep up the spirits of Londoners during the bombing. WWII helped shape his belief that art should be brought to the widest audience, a social and moral position that would inform the rest of his career.

In his new show at The Lionheart Gallery in Pound Ridge, N.Y., “Kings & Queens of Late Night,” running through January 2nd, “recovering lawyer” Geoffrey Stein paints collage portraits of an all-star cast of network and cable comedy and punditry.

Stein’s Lionheart Gallery lineup of the late night heroes who wield wit and humor like surgical scalpels includes Jon Stewart, Jay Leno, Amy Schumer, Jimmy Fallon, Chelsea Handler, Samantha Bee, Larry Wilmore, Bill Maher, John Oliver, Trevor Noah, Stephen Colbert and David Letterman.

Examples from this exhibit include Jon Stewart’s portrait made with the 9/11 Responders’ act he championed, Amy Schumer done with her cousin Chuck Schumer’s Gun Control bill, Jimmy Fallon created from thank you cards, and John Oliver done with USA Today and the London Tube Map.

Stein, who lives and works in New York City, received an MFA from the Slade School of Fine Art in London and has been painting full-time since 2000. 

Shawn Stone, Digital Editor of The Alt (launching 11/15), joins us to talk about what he's seen lately and what cultural events are coming up this week in our region.

Capital region resident Patrick Harbron began his career photographing the luminaries of rock and roll. Rock and Roll Icons: Photographs by Patrick Harbron is an exhibition at the Albany Institute of History & Art taken from Harbron’s body of concert and portrait photography of influential musicians and groups of the 1970’s and 1980’s, captured at pivotal moments in their careers.

The exhibition features many photographs that have never been published or exhibited. Harbron photographed artists such as Blondie, Rush, Stevie Ray Vaughan, The Police, Bruce Springsteen, Madonna and Elvis Costello early in their careers. He followed these artists to prominence and others that were already well known including The Rolling Stones, Pink Floyd, Led Zeppelin, Van Halen, Eric Clapton, David Bowie, Queen, The Who, Genesis, KISS, U2, Aerosmith, and Prince.

The exhibition will include Harbron’s collection of posters and ephemera gathered throughout his career along with guitars borrowed from the Rock and Roll Hall of Fame. The exhibit runs from November 5th through February 12th. 

The Teaching Gallery at Hudson Valley Community College presents Floating World, an exhibition of paintings by New Lebanon artist Maggie Mailer, on view through October 22nd.

The paintings in Mailer’s Floating World are richly layered, ambiguous landscapes that bravely embody the artist’s willingness to trust her viewers. Mailer says the title refers to the “floating world” of 18th century Japanese Ukiyo-e prints, a worldview based on hedonism, pleasure and escapism. It was a world envisioned to be safe from danger, sadness or disasters, both real and imagined.

Mailer’s painting process is an intentionally unscientific combination of instinct, skill, accident and trust. Upon close inspection, any particular moment of a painting might contain layers of sheer, luscious color, references to classical masterworks, day-glow colors seemingly thrown down or scumbled, or thin layers that barely cover the canvas.

Maggie Mailer and Founding director of the Teaching Gallery Tara Fracalossi  join us. 

  Richard Michelson has had a wonderful friendship with actor and artist Leonard Nimoy. After Nimoy’s passing, Michelson has written a new picture book, Fascinating: The Life of Leonard Nimoy.

He is also presenting a beautiful exhibit: UNSEEN: Fifty never before exhibited photographs by Leonard Nimoy which is now open and runs through October 25th.

Michelson will be speaking in Great Barrington on September 9th from 10:30 to noon presented by The Jewish Federation of the Berkshires and will have a publication party. Later that night will be the official opening of UNSEEN at the R. Michelson Galleries in Northampton, MA.

To celebrate the September 8th - 50th anniversary of the first Trek episode – we welcome Richard Michelson to The Roundtable.

  By now, it’s pretty likely you’ve heard or read something about a little musical about a "ten-dollar Founding Father without a father" played or transcribed somewhere (everywhere).

Hamilton: An American Musical is ubiquitous and its reach far exceeds the confines of Broadway’s Richard Rodgers Theatre. The excitement created by Lin-Manuel Miranda’s masterwork bursts the fandom of the musical into a genuine interest in American History for many people.

So, if you were a museum in Albany, New York - a city where the Founding Father and first Treasury Secretary spent more than a little time -- what would you do?

If you answered put together a show about General George Washington's aide-de-camp and right-hand-man, you’d have had the same thought as The Albany Institute of History and Art.

A small exhibition exploring Alexander Hamilton’s time in Albany is currently on display. Curator, Diane Shewchuck, joins us to tell us more.

  Carrie Haddad was the first art gallery to open back in 1991 on Warren St. in Hudson NY. She has been a pivotal resource for assisting other galleries to follow suit, helping to the economy of the city to bring more people to town as well as giving exposure to local artists who would otherwise have no venue.

Twenty-five years later, approximately 100 represented artists work in mediums including painting, sculpture, photography and mixed media and are featured in 7 annual exhibits. 

   Since its inception in 1984, the focus of The Jack Shainman Gallery has been to exhibit, represent and champion artists from around the world, in particular artists from Africa, East Asia, and North America.

Founded by Jack Shainman and Claude Simard in Washington D. C. -- the gallery relocated to New York City occupying a space in the East Village before moving to Soho and then to its current location in Chelsea in 1997.

In 2013 the gallery added two additional exhibition spaces, one in Chelsea and the other a 30,000 square foot schoolhouse in Kinderhook, New York.

The former Martin Van Buren Elementary School has been redesigned to include a 5,000 foot exhibition space with 24-foot ceilings, accompanied by traditional gallery spaces on the second floor that have been transformed from existing classrooms. The property sits on five acres of land that provide a temporary home for outdoor sculptural and site-specific installations. Its inaugural exhibition in 2014 was work by Nick Cave.

A Change of Place: Four Solo Exhibitions will mark The School’s second anniversary when it opens this Sunday.

The School's last group show, Winter in America, included some prints from a journal from the late 1800s that was found recently in the Kinderhook Memorial Library. The library is having a reception, also on Sunday, at The Feed & Seed store from 2-6pm.

Jack Shainman joins us along with Collections Manager, Rachel Fainter.

  Video games have come a long way since Pong; the video game is an artistic medium all its own now. The current exhibition at The Opalka Gallery at Sage College From Concept to Console looks at art in video games, pulling back the curtain to reveal the process of how it is conceived and created. It’s an examination of the creativity, diversity, and wide range of artistry that spans many disciplines in a medium that is, in some ways, still in its infancy.

There is a curator tour at the gallery this Friday at 5:30 p.m. but we get to give you a little preview now. Curators Elizabeth Greenberg and Edward Ticson join us.

  Arcadia, a exhibition of new paintings by Maggie Mailer, is on display at McDaris Fine Art on Warren St. in Hudson, NY through November 15th.

In 2009, Maggie became the first Artist in Residence at the Berkshire Museum in Pittsfield, MA. In 2002 she founded the Storefront Artist Project in Pittsfield, MA, which for 10 years served to establish a transparent boundary between the artist at work and the public sphere. Her work has been featured in Art New England, with cover stories in The Boston Globe, and The Los Angeles Times.

  This week, The Frances Young Tang Teaching Museum and Art Gallery at Skidmore College announced a new upcoming exhibition entitled Dismantling The House, which opens Friday, August 21, and runs through October 18.

Ian Berry is the Director of The Tang and joins us now to tell us more about that and to fill us in on all other things Tang – including their UpBeat on the Roof summer concert series.

www.zigiland.com

  World renowned, New York-based painter and sculptor, Zigi Ben-Haim's exhibit Made in the USA is now up at the Lake Placid Center for the Arts.

Made in the USA exhibits a cross section of works: paintings, sculptures and drawings. It also includes a new series of paintings on burlap, created in 2015.  Ben-Haim has stated that his paintings on aluminum address the current state of environmental affairs, which concerns humanity's place in the universe. The large-scale, multi-layered works present nature as simultaneously fragmented and grand.

© 2015 The Andy Warhol Foundation for the Visual Arts, Inc. / Artists Rights Society (ARS), New York

  The first US exhibition to concentrate on artist Andy Warhol’s book work, Warhol by the Book opened at the Williams College Museum of Art (WCMA) March 7 and will be on view through August 16.

  During and just after World Wars I and II in Britain - in an era known as the Machine Age, the tumultuous political climate and the prevalence of industry and mechanization influenced the art created at that time.

Machine Age Modernism: Prints from the Daniel Cowin Collection is a new exhibition at The Clark in Williamstown, MA. The exhibition features a wide range of lithographs, dry points, woodcut prints and linocuts produced during the period exploring themes such as cityscapes, war, industrial technology, rural farming, sport, and leisure activity.

    The exhibition, Winslow Homer: Making Art Making History is currently on display at The Clark Art Museum in Williamstown, MA through September 8th. It features more than 200 works by Homer - spanning his career and including paintings, watercolors, drawings, etchings, lithographs, chromolithographs,wood engravings, photographs, correspondence, and books.

Homer began his career as an illustrator for the popular press, providing pictures of current events for newspapers in Boston and New York. Historians use these, as well as his paintings and watercolors, to illustrate mid-nineteenth-century 

  political and economic developments. Art historians, too, use the works to explore not only Homer’s life and endeavors, but also to consider broader questions such as the rise of the critical press, the quest for a national style, and the ramifications of the expanding nineteenth-century art market.

Michael Cassin - the Director for The Clark’s Center for Education in the Visual Arts - takes us on an audio tour of the exhibition.

Albany Center Gallery

Nov 28, 2012
metroland.net

    Albany Center Gallery on Columbia Street in downtown Albany is celebrating its 35th year of showcasing the work of artists in the capital region. This Saturday is their Annual Masquerade Gala and next week they open their annual member show.

We learn more about the gallery from Executive Director, Tony Iadicicco.

The Catskill Gallery Association and the Green County Council on the Arts present the Fifth Annual Village of Catskill Artists Studio and Gallery Tour this weekend. We are joined by Artist Dan Burkholder, Tour Coordinator David V. Griffin, and Gallerist Frank Cuthbert.