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women

Book cover for "Period. End of Sentence."
Scribner / Scribner

The documentary film "Period. End of Sentence." won an Oscar in 2019 and now there is a book with the same name which outlines the challenges facing those who menstruate worldwide and the solutions championed by a new generation of body positive activists, innovators and public figures.

Including interviews from people on the frontlines, "Period. End of Sentence." illuminates the many ways that menstrual injustice can limit opportunities, erode self-esteem, and even threaten lives.

Journalist Anita Diament is the author of the new book and joins us this morning.

Book cover artwork for "The Secret History of Home Economics"
W. W. Norton & Company

The term “home economics” may conjure traumatic memories of lopsided hand-sewn pillows or sunken muffins. But common conception obscures the story of the revolutionary science of better living. The field exploded opportunities for women in the twentieth century by reducing domestic work and providing jobs as professors, engineers, chemists, and businesspeople. And it has something to teach us today.

In "The Secret History of Home Economics," Danielle Dreilinger traces the field’s history from Black colleges to Eleanor Roosevelt to Okinawa, from a Betty Crocker brigade to DIY techies. These women (and they were mostly women) became chemists and marketers, studied nutrition, health, and exercise, tested parachutes, created astronaut food, and took bold steps in childhood development and education.

Danielle Dreilinger is a former New Orleans Times-Picayune education reporter and a Knight-Wallace Journalism Fellow. She also wrote for the Boston Globe and worked at the Boston NPR station WGBH.

Book cover for "Letter To a Young Female Physician"
W. W. Norton & Company

In 2017, Dr. Suzanne Koven published an essay describing the challenges faced by female physicians, including her own personal struggle with "imposter syndrome"―a long-held secret belief that she was not smart enough or good enough to be a “real” doctor. Accessed by thousands of readers around the world, Koven’s “Letter to a Young Female Physician” has evolved into a new book - a reflection on her career in medicine.

With warmth, clarity, and wisdom, "Letter to a Young Female Physician" reveals a woman forging her authentic identity in a modern landscape that is as overwhelming and confusing as it is exhilarating in its possibilities.

Book cover art for "Think Like A Breadwinner"
G.P. Putnam's Sons

Although nearly half of working women in the United States are now their household's main breadwinner, the majority of women still aren't raised to think like breadwinners. In fact, they're actually discouraged from building their own wealth, pursuing their full earning potential, and providing for themselves and others financially.

Financial expert Jennifer Barrett addresses the issue in her new book "Think Like A Breadwinner: A Wealth-Building Manifesto for Women Who Want to Earn More (and Worry Less)."

Jennifer Barrett is the Chief Education Officer at Acorns, a financial wellness app with more than 8.5 million users, and the founding editor of its popular money site, Grow.

Book cover for "Sidelined"
Dutton

The #MeToo movement has touched every facet of the entertainment industry. But, what about the professional sports world?

In her new book, “Sidelined: Sports, Culture, and Being a Woman in America,” award-winning journalist, former sports radio host, and Deadspin editor Julie DiCaro tackles the myriad ways sexism pervades sports at all levels.

From condescending coverage of women’s pro sports, to high barriers that women face breaking into and excelling in sports media, to male athletes and managers who abuse their partners yet face minimal consequences, DiCaro examines the destructive impact that misogyny has on athletes, sports reporters, and fans alike.

Composer Evan Mack is a Senior Teaching Professor at Skidmore College and joins us to discuss the release of his new recording titled “The Travelled Road,” recorded at Zankel Music Center in Saratoga Springs and featuring Metropolitan Opera mezzo-soprano Megan Marino, pianist John Arida and cellist Jameson Platte.

Each selection features lyrics from noteworthy figures in history, including “A Little More Perfect,” Justice Anthony Kennedy’s majority opinion on Obergefell v. Hodges; “Three Reflections of Sister Dorothy,” written by Sr. Dorothy Stang, a nun from Ohio who was murdered by hire in the Brazilian Amazon while working to help poor farmers and save the rainforest; “Preach Sister, Preach,” celebrating the words of iconic women; “The Secret Ocean,” poems by Mark Jarman which deal with the passage of time; and “The Road and the End,” Carl Sandburg’s famous 1916 poem.

The new CD is “The Travelled Road.”

Book cover for "Women in White Coats'
Park Row

Medical journalist Olivia Campbell joins us this morning to discuss her new book, "Women in White Coats," the little-known true story of three pioneering Victorian women who fought to become the first women doctors, revolutionizing healthcare forever.

Olivia Campbell is a journalist and author specializing in medicine and women; her work has appeared in The Guardian, The Washington Post, and New York Magazine, among others.

Book cover (paperback) for The Four Winds
St. Martin's Press

Kristin Hannah is the number-one bestselling author of "The Nightingale" and "The Great Alone." 

Her latest, "The Four Winds," is an American epic about love and heroism and hope set during the Great Depression and the Dust Bowl.

Book cover "Run to Win"
Provided - Dutton

For the past thirty-five years EMILY's List has helped the campaigns of thousands of pro-choice Democratic women, but the hardest part has always been convincing more women to run. Then Donald Trump was elected, and something shifted into place. American women who were furious and frustrated were looking for a way to channel their outrage into action, united in proclaiming, "If that guy can get elected, why not me?"

"Run to Win" is for all women who are looking to lead. Organized around the steps that EMILY's List coaches its candidates through (from deciding to run through celebrating victory), this book is full of essential lessons for any woman trying to succeed in a male-dominated field. Their arena is politics but their message is universal.

And Stephanie Schriock is the most qualified person to share these lessons. Since Schriock became president of EMILY's List in 2010, she has overseen a decade of phenomenal growth in the organization, raising hundreds of millions of dollars, helping elect record numbers of women to the House and Senate, and recruiting and training hundreds more. EMILY's List is now nearly five million members strong. The book is co-authored by Christina Reynolds.

Joe Donahue: Glennon Doyle is the author of the number one New York Times bestseller “Love Warrior” an Oprah's Book Club selection as well as the New York Times bestseller “Carry On, Warrior.” An activist, speaker, and thought leader, she is also the founder and president of Together Rising, an all women-lead nonprofit organization that has revolutionized grassroots philanthropy, raising over $20 million for women, families and children in crisis.

Her latest, “Untamed” is both a memoir and a wakeup call. It offers an examination of the restrictive expectations women are issued from birth, shows how hustling to meet those expectations leaves women feeling dissatisfied and lost, overwhelmed and underwhelmed, and reveals that when we quit abandoning ourselves and instead abandon the world's expectations of us, they become women who can finally look at themselves in the mirror and recognize there she is. 

Book cover artwork for "Cassandra Speaks"
harpercollins.com / harpercollins.com

Co-founder of the Omega Institute, Elizabeth Lesser, believes that if women’s voices had been equally heard and respected throughout history, humankind would have followed different hero myths and guiding stories—stories that value caretaking, champion compassion, and elevate communication over vengeance and violence. She joined us to talk about her new book, "Cassandra Speaks."

Sigrid Nunez’s first book since “The Friend,” winner of the National Book Award, looks back to a precarious, pre-pandemic world. "What You Are Going Through" is a story of death and companionship, loneliness and obligation and as she writes: “Messy life. Unfair life. Life that must be dealt with.” 

In a world in which the word masculinity now often goes hand in hand with toxic, comedian, actor, and father Michael Ian Black offers up a way forward for boys, men, and anyone who loves them. Part memoir, part advice book, and written as a heartfelt letter to his college-bound son, "A Better Man" reveals Black’s own complicated relationship with his father, explores the damage and rising violence caused by the expectations placed on boys to “man up,” and searches for the best way to help young men be part of the solution, not the problem.

Joe Donahue: Emma Donoghue's new novel "The Pull of the Stars", brings us to Dublin 1918, in a maternity ward at the height of the great flu. With the country doubly ravaged by war and disease, Nurse Julia Power works at an understaffed hospital in the city center where expecting mothers who have come down with influenza are quarantined together. Into Julia's regimented world steps two outsiders: Dr. Kathleen Lin, a rumored Rebel on the run from the police, and a young volunteer helper, Bridie Sweeney. Over three days, these women change each other's lives in unexpected and profound ways. Emma Donoghue is the author of several novels including "Akin", "Landing", "The Wonder", and the international best-seller "Room", in which her screen adaptation was nominated for four Academy Awards. 

Award-winning writer and public health executive Michelle Bowdler's new memoir, "Is Rape a Crime?," indicts how sexual violence has been addressed for decades in our society, asking whether rape is a crime given that it is the least reported major felony, least successfully prosecuted, and fewer than 3% of reported rapes result in conviction. Cases are closed before they are investigated and DNA evidence sits for years untested and disregarded

Rape in this country is not treated as a crime of brutal violence but often as a question of he said / she said. Bowdler says given all this, it seems fair to ask whether rape is actually a crime.

Michelle Bowdler is the Executive Director of Health & Wellness at Tufts University and, after graduating from the Harvard School of Public Health, has worked on social justice issues related to rape for over a decade. "Is Rape a Crime?" is her first book.

Ferrin Contemporary is presenting "Nature/Nurture," a group exhibition of twelve contemporary female artists invited to explore the influence of gender and its impact on their practice. The show was organized in honor of Women's History Month in conjunction with FOREFRONT2020, a symposium on women in the visual arts taking place on the MASS MoCA campus.

The exhibition explores these ideas that range from direct interpretations of the natural world to more abstract notions, such as the construction of gender and the endowed role of women within their personal and professional careers. Works in clay range in form from individual vessels to composed still lifes and figural and abstract sculpture.

Considering the impact that the #MeToo movement is having on all professions, artists were asked to pause and reflect on the role gender plays in their artistic practice and to consider the nurturing experiences that have shaped them. To tell us more, we welcome Senior Curator of Visual Arts at MASS MoCA Susan Cross, an artist featured in Ferrin Contemporary's "Nature/Nurture" group exhibition Anina Major, and director of Ferrin Contemporary and curator of Nature/Nurture Leslie Ferrin.

Sabrina Gschwandtner, American (born 1977) Elizabeth Keckley Diamond, 2014 16mm polyester film, polyester thread, and lithographic ink in a light box, 15 7/8 × 16 13/16 × 3 1/16in. Museum Purchase, 2017.19
https://www.mwpai.org/

The new exhibition “Celebrating Suffrage” at the Munson-Williams-Proctor Arts Institute in Utica, New York marks the 100-year anniversary of Congress’s ratification of women’s suffrage, the right for American women to vote in all government elections.

Women found unique creative outlets before and after they were officially recognized as full citizens of the United States. This exhibition explores the role of art as a vehicle for women, as individuals or in groups, to reflect, reform, or challenge social beliefs and political practices of their era.

“Celebrating Suffrage” examines how women created their place within the larger art community, adding an important vision that has often been overlooked or undervalued. This anniversary presents the opportunity to celebrate the contributions to subject matter, materials, and means of expression that women have made to the visual arts in the United States.

Miranda Hofelt is Curator of 19th-Century American Art at MWPAI.

In Gish Jen’s latest “The Resisters,” we meet Gwen who has a Golden Arm and her teens find her happily playing in an underground baseball league. The novel is the story of an America that seems ever more possible. It is also the story of one family struggling to maintain its humanity and normalcy in circumstances that threaten their every value as well as their very existence.

Monique W. Morris, co-founder of the National Black Women’s Justice Institute, is the author of several books, including "Pushout," and "Black Stats." Her work has been featured by NPR, the New York Times, MSNBC, Essence, The Atlantic, the Washington Post, Education Week, and others.

Wise Black women have known for centuries that the blues have been a platform for truth-telling, an underground musical railroad to survival, and an essential form of resistance, healing, and learning.

In her highly anticipated book "Sing a Rhythm, Dance a Blues: Education for the Liberation of Black and Brown Girls," leading advocate Monique W. Morris invokes the spirit of the blues to articulate a radically healing and empowering pedagogy for Black and Brown girls. The book reimagines what education might look like if schools placed the thriving of Black and Brown girls at their center.

Born in 1819, Clara Schumann was a composer and piano teacher - regarded as one of the most distinguished pianists of the Romantic era.

This weekend The Albany Symphony will celebrate her life and music in The Clara Schumann Festival.

Musicians from the Graduate Program at Bard College Conservatory will perform vocal and instrumental chamber works on Saturday, January 11 at 3 p.m. and Sunday, January 12 at 11 a.m.

Then, on Saturday at 7:30 p.m. and Sunday at 3 p.m., The Albany Symphony will present works by Clara Schumann, Robert Schumann, Johannes Brahms, and a World Premiere by Loren Loiacono. The orchestra will be joined by pianist Harmony Zhu.

These concerts will take place at The Troy Savings Bank Music Hall in Troy, New York and we are joined by Harmony Zhu, Loren Loiacono, and Albany Symphony Music Director and Conductor, David Alan Miller.  

New York Times columnist Gail Collins has written a new book on a subject that is timelier than ever: women and aging in America. Author of the acclaimed New York Times bestsellers “When Everything Changed” and “America’s Women,” Collins was the first woman to serve as the editorial page editor on the New York Times.

Her new book is “No Stopping Us Now: The Adventures of Older Women in American History.”

Helsinki Hudson presents Anne Heaton and Natalia Zukerman: An Evening of Songs and Stories on December 5 at 8pm.

The multimedia evening will feature excerpts from Zukerman's latest show "The Women Who Rode Away" and from Heaton's new album and storybook "To the Light"

Natalia Zukerman's “The Women Who Rode Away” melds her talents as a songwriter, painter, and storyteller as she recounts the journey of finding her voice through the stories of the women in her life and in history that paved the way. 

Anne Heaton’s “To the Light” is a celebration of collaboration and connection. Heaton is the Founder of Soul Songs School.

Alice Hoffman’s latest book is a bittersweet parable about the costs of survival and the behaviors that define humanity. “The World That We Knew” is set in Berlin in 1941. It follows the lives of three women who become intertwined in order to survive the dangers of the Nazi regime.

This is an Off The Shelf edition of The Book Show, recorded in Saratoga Springs in an event presented by Northshire Bookstore.

mass.gov

On Tuesday, the Berkshire County Commission on the Status of Women and Girls will hold a listening session in Pittsfield, Massachusetts. The Women's Fund of Western Massachusetts will present data on the lives of women and girls in the region, and allow locals to share their experiences. It’s scheduled to start at 6:30 p.m. at Greylock Federal Credit Union on Kellogg Street. Commission chair Meg Bossong spoke with WAMC about the event.

The Arts Center of the Capital Region is partnering with YWCA of the Greater Capital Region for their 5th Annual “Brava!”, a fundraiser seeking to provide new bras to women and girls that live at YWCA-GCR and those in need in the Greater Capital Region at no cost. 

The event will feature writers from around the region and beyond who will read jury-selected poems and essays or perform songs and monologues on the subject of brassieres in their lives. The pieces will touch on the subject from many viewpoints and range from poignant to hilarious. 

New this year: BraVa! The Book: Stories that Celebrate Something Close to Our Hearts, a compilation of pieces performed at BraVa! 2015 - 2018. To tell us more we welcome BraVa founder Marion Roach and Starletta Smith, acting director of the YWCA-GCR.

The new book, "Represent," is an interactive and inspiring step-by-step guide showing women how to run for the approximately 500,000 elected offices in the United States.

Co-written by former chief of staff at EMILY’s list Kate Black and actress, comedian, screenwriter, producer, podcaster, and activist June Diane Raphael, "Represent" is structured around a 21-point document called “I’m Running for Office: The Checklist.” Doubling as a workbook, "Represent" covers it all, from the nuts and bolts of where to run, fundraising, and filing deadlines, to issues like balancing family and campaigning, managing social media and how running for office can work in your real life.

Kate Black joined us.

Imani Winds
Pierre Lidar

The Albany Symphony will return to the stage for the grand opening of its new season this Saturday, October 19th at the Palace Theatre in downtown Albany with a gallery of works that includes Maurice Ravel’s orchestration of Mussorgsky’s "Pictures at an Exhibition," Bernstein’s Suite from the Academy Award-winning film, “On the Waterfront,” and "Phenomenal Women," an inspiring musical portrait of powerhouse women by composer Valerie Coleman featuring Imani Winds.

This program is the first of 20 unique concerts, each curated by Grammy Award-winning conductor David Alan Miller, featuring phenomenal women in music, encounters with thrilling new music, and masterworks that have withstood the test of time.

David Alan Miller joins us along with Imani Winds’ musicians Brandon Patrick George and Toyin Spellman-Diaz.

Overcoming obstacles such as sexism and discrimination by male artists, art critics, and art dealers, a group of fearless women including Lee Krasner, Elaine de Kooning, and Joan Mitchell made careers for themselves by embracing avant-garde painting.

"Heroines of Abstract Expressionism," now open at Fenimore Art Museum in Cooperstown, New York offers visitors a special glimpse of a one-of-a-kind private collection of paintings, works on paper, and sculpture by women artists who pioneered Abstract Expressionism in the United States during the 1940s and 1950s.

Organized by the Fenimore, this major exhibition consists of over 30 works from the Richard P. Friedman and Cindy Lou Wakefield collection featuring objects that are both visually mesmerizing and technically complex. Richard Friedman joins us this morning along with Fenimore Director of Exhibitions, Chris Rossi.

Three-time National Book Award Finalist Steve Sheinkin will be having a release party for his new book, “Born to Fly: The First Women's Air Race Across America” at the Northshire Bookstore in Saratoga Springs, New York on Tuesday, September 24 at 6 p.m.

"Born to Fly” is the story of the fearless women pilots who aimed for the skies and beyond. Just nine years after American women finally got the right to vote, a group of trailblazers soared to new heights in the 1929 Air Derby, the first women's air race across the U.S.

Jodi Kantor and Megan Twohey are investigative reporters at the New York Times. Their new book is "She Said."

For many years, reporters had tried to get to the truth about Harvey Weinstein’s treatment of women. Rumors of wrongdoing had long circulated. But in 2017, when Jodi Kantor and Megan Twohey began their investigation into the prominent Hollywood producer for the New York Times, his name was still synonymous with power.

Nothing could have prepared Kantor and Twohey for what followed the publication of their initial Weinstein story on October 5, 2017. Within days, a veritable Pandora’s box of sexual harassment and abuse was opened. Women all over the world came forward with their own traumatic stories.

Twohey has focused much of her attention on the treatment of women and children, and, in 2014, as a reporter with Reuters News, was a finalist for the Pulitzer Prize for Investigative Reporting. She shared numerous honors for breaking the Harvey Weinstein story, including a George Polk Award, and the Pulitzer Prize for Public Service. She joined us.

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