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poland

Esther Safran Foer grew up in a home where the past was too terrible to speak of - born in Poland after World War II, her mother and father each the sole survivors of their respective families. For Esther, the Holocaust loomed in the backdrop of her daily life, but never felt discussed. The result was a childhood marked by painful silences and continued tragedy.

Even as she built a successful career married and raised three children, Esther always filter self searching. When Esther was in her early 40s, her mother casually mentioned in astonishing revelation that Esther's father had a previous wife and daughter both murdered in the Holocaust.

That would mark the beginning of the search that would define the next 20 years. She writes about it in her new book, "I Want You to Know We're Still Here" where she recounts her journey to piece together her past.

Esther Safran for was the CEO of Sixth & I, a center for arts, ideas and religion. She lives in Washington with her husband, Bert. They are the parents of Franklin, Jonathan and Joshua Safran Foer, all bestselling authors.

Dr. Alan Chartock
Eric Korenman

WAMC's Dr. Alan Chartock shares his thoughts on the latest developments on Brexit. Dr. Chartock also discusses the ongoing climate talks in Poland.

  Louis Begley, best known for his masterful observations of life in New York City’s upper crust, made his thriller debut with Killer Come Hither.

That book told the story of former Marine Corps officer turned novelist and Yale Alum, Jack Dana. Now Begley continues Jack’s story in the sequel, Kill and Be Killed.


  In this week’s Classical Music According to Yehuda, Alan Chartock and Yehuda Hanani continue their conversation about female composers - focusing on Maria Agata Szymanowska.

Yehuda’s Close Encounter with Music series begins their new season on October 15th with the Chamber Orchestra Kremlin in a program of Haydn, Tchaikovsky, and Shostakovich.

  The play, Life in a Jar tells the story of Irena Sendler, a Polish Catholic social worker, who assisted in hiding over 2,000 Jewish children who had been living in the Warsaw Ghetto during World War II.

While the play dramatizes Jewish life in the Warsaw Ghetto during the war; it relays, as importantly, the heroic story of the 'righteous gentiles' who put their lives and that of their families at grave risk to save others by forging documents and hiding and placing Jewish children in convents and Polish homes

The impact of the Irena Sendler Project are many, including the book - Life in a Jar by Jack Mayer who will be attending two performances at Skidmore College in Saratoga Springs and will take part in the Q and A following the play.