PFAS | WAMC

PFAS

Alcove Reservoir Dam
Albany Water Dept.

Albany's municipal water system made it through the worst of the pandemic without a hiccup.

Cohoes Mayor Bill Keeler, Assemblymember John McDonald
Jackie Orchard/WAMC

A bill banning the burning of AFFF firefighting foam has passed both the New York State Assembly and Senate. The legislation was crafted specifically for Cohoes, as the prohibition would only impact cities with populations between 16,000 and 17,000 people.

A vote in New York on whether to adopt recommended maximum contaminant levels in drinking water for three chemicals has been postponed a second time because of the COVID-19 pandemic. Still, clean water advocates say they are disappointed with another delay.

William Keeler
William Keeler

Concerns remain over environmental pollution from burning toxic materials at the Norlite site in Cohoes.

Dr. David Bond speaking during a Zoom video conference.
Zoom

The mayor of Cohoes is siding with environmental activists who are recommending immediately stopping the burning of PFAS at a local plant.

In New York, as a result of the COVID-19 response, a meeting at which recommended maximum contaminant levels for three chemicals were to come up for a vote has been postponed.

Composite Image by Dave Lucas

After traces of PFAS chemicals were found in water samples taken near the Dunn Landfill in Rensselaer, activists are stepping up their campaign to convince the New York State Department of Environmental Conservation to close the landfill.

PFAS contamination has sent communities around the Northeast scrambling.

In today’s Congressional Corner, Democratic Representative Antonio Delgado of New York’s 19th House district continues his conversation with WAMC’s Alan Chartock.

Officials gathered at the LOB in Albany for the announcement about new legislation to ban the burning of substances containing PFAS chemicals.
WAMC photo by Dave Lucas

Two Democratic state lawmakers from the Capital Region are introducing new legislation to ban the burning of substances containing PFAS chemicals.

Cohoes Mayor Bill Keeler speaking Feb. 25, 2020.
Jackie Orchard / WAMC

Cohoes Mayor Bill Keeler met with officials from Norlite Tuesday after a federal lawsuit filed last week claimed the company’s facility incinerated PFAS-based substances. 

EPA Inches Toward PFAS Drinking Water Regulation

Feb 24, 2020

The U.S. Environmental Protection Agency has taken the next step toward setting drinking water limits for two PFAS chemicals — PFOA and PFOS. Environmentalists say the step is small and they want to see quicker, bolder action.

After a federal lawsuit this week claimed that PFAS-based substances were incinerated at the Norlite facility in Cohoes, the New York state Department of Environmental Conservation says it is investigating.

SaferStates

A new report shows states are stepping up to protect public health from harmful chemicals.

WAMC, Allison Dunne

New York Congressman Sean Patrick Maloney was at the site of a Newburgh lake where PFOS contamination was revealed in 2016 today, calling on Senate Majority Leader Mitch McConnell to immediately take up PFAS legislation passed in the House this month.

A glass of water
WAMC

An environmental group believes the class of toxic chemicals at the center of contamination crises in communities like Hoosick Falls and Newburgh can likely be detected in all major water supplies in the United States.

U.S. House Passes PFAS Action Legislation

Jan 13, 2020

The U.S. House of Representatives on Friday passed the PFAS Action Act. The legislation package includes 11 bills, two that were authored by New York Congressmen in the Hudson Valley whose districts include communities battling PFOA and PFOS.

Several U.S. Reps Urge Passage Of PFAS Action Act

Jan 9, 2020
USDA/Wikimedia Commons - Public Domain

Several Democratic U.S. House representatives are calling on their colleagues to pass a bill Friday concerning PFAS chemicals. It’s a bill that President Trump’s senior advisors will recommend he veto.

The annual federal defense bill, known as the National Defense Authorization Act, does not include certain provisions that would address PFAS water contamination. A Washington-based nonprofit group accuses Congress of caving on cleaning up the toxic substances.

Vermont state officials will be on hand in the Bennington area this week to answer questions about ongoing remediation efforts for PFAS contamination.

Drone flying.
WAMC photo by Dave Lucas

Vermont agencies are using aerial drones to study toxic chemical contamination underneath an airport.

WAMC, Allison Dunne

With news that a temporary filtration system is back on track at Stewart Air National Guard base, officials are keeping a close eye on the timeline for the project. The remedial measure is supposed to address PFAS contamination.

WikiMedia Commons

The New York State Department of Environmental Conservation has announced the completion of a study by the companies at the center of the investigation into contaminated water in Hoosick Falls. WAMC’s Southern Adirondack Bureau Chief Lucas Willard reports the study examines possible options for a new municipal drinking water source.

 In this photo dated March 2018, Cindy Doran stands near the St. Gobain plant on the river in Hoosick Falls, site of the PFOA contamination.
Cindy Doran for Assembly

Advocates for clean drinking water say proposed new limits by the New York State Health Department for PFOA and other chemicals in the water supply linked to cancer and other serious illnesses are too high, and will lead to serious health problems.

A top environmental official in New Hampshire has told a Congressional hearing that the federal government should be leading the way in setting standards for a class of toxic chemicals that has caused widespread contamination in the state.

WAMC, Allison Dunne

The U.S. Department of Defense is establishing a PFAS Task Force to address contamination at more than 400 military installations and surrounding communities across the nation. Stewart Air National Guard base in Newburgh is one of those places.

Photo of a faucet
WAMC photo by Dave Lucas

A New Hampshire legislative committee has voted to approve some of the nation's toughest drinking water standards for a class of toxic chemicals that have caused widespread contamination and sparked health concerns.

The Vermont Air National Guard says it's expanding its investigation into  chemical contamination near the South Burlington base for a class of potentially toxic chemicals.

The state of Vermont has released a new sampling plan for PFAS chemicals.

Westchester County Executive George Latimer has signed two executive orders aimed at safeguarding the public from PFAS chemicals. He wants to prevent the kind of drinking water contamination that has occurred in Newburgh and elsewhere in the state and country.

Today, the U.S. House Energy and Commerce Committee’s Environment and Climate Change Subcommittee is holding a legislative hearing on a series of bills related to PFAS contaminants, a class of compounds discovered in water supplies across the country.

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