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Wikimedia Commons/Diego Grez

Police in Watervliet say the human remains found in a yard were those of a newborn child.

Saratoga author Nicolas DiDomizio’s debut is "Burn It All Down," a mother/son, crime/revenge thriller Eighteen-year-old aspiring comic Joey Rossi just found out his boyfriend has been cheating on him for the past ten months. Joey was born with an addiction to toxic jerks—something he inherited from his mom (and best friend): 34-year-old Gia Rossi.

When Gia’s latest non-relationship goes up in flames only a day later, the pair’s Bayonne, New Jersey apartment can barely contain their rage. In a misguided attempt at revenge, Joey and Gia inadvertently commit a series of crimes and flee the state, running to the only good man either of them has ever known—Gia’s ex, Marco.

Prior to his career in fiction, Nicolas wrote for the internet for several years while also working in corporate roles at Condé Nast, MTV, and more.

Book cover for "Halfway Home" and author photo of Reuben Miller
Little Brown and Company

  Each year, more than half a million Americans are released from prison and join a population of twenty million people who live with a felony record.
 
Reuben Miller, a chaplain at the Cook County Jail in Chicago and now a sociologist studying mass incarceration, spent years alongside prisoners, ex-prisoners, their friends, and their families to understand the lifelong burden that even a single arrest can entail. What his work revealed is a simple, if overlooked truth: life after incarceration is its own form of prison.

Miller's book is "Halfway Home: Race, Punishment, and the Afterlife of Mass Incarceration."

Albany Police Headquarters on Henry Johnson Boulevard
WAMC photo by Dave Lucas

A woman was killed and four others injured in a shooting Saturday night on Central Avenue in Albany. 

Schenectady DA Bob Carney, March 2017.
Dave Lucas / WAMC

A Schenectady County foster parent has formally been charged with killing a four-year-old boy placed in his care.

Picture of a judge's gavel
WikiMedia Commons

Community activists in Albany say a court needs to consider mitigating factors before a man accused of accidentally shooting his daughter appears before a judge this week.

Book cover for "High Crimes"
MacMillan Publishers / https://us.macmillan.com/

Award-winning journalists Michael D’Antonio and Peter Eisner join us to discuss their new book "High Crimes: The Corruption, Impunity, and Impeachment of Donald Trump." The book offers the most comprehensive inside story behind our most significant modern political drama: the House impeachment of Donald Trump.

Having spent a year essentially embedded inside several House committees, D'Antonio and Eisner draw on many sources to expose the politicking, playcalling, and strategies debated backstage and to explain the Democrats' successes and apparent public failures during the show itself.

Ayshawn Davis
Photo provided

The City of Troy is reeling from the shooting death of 11-year-old Ayshawn Davis Sunday night. So far, authorities have yet to identify a suspect or suspects in the killing — the 12th homicide the Collar City has experienced this year, as violence has increased across the Capital Region during a pandemic and economic downturn. 

The new book, "The Grifter's Club: Trump, Mar-a-Lago, and The Selling of the Presidency," gives new insight into how politics and power really work in the age of Trump.

The book is an account of the palatial resort where President Trump conducts government business with little regard for ethics, security, or the law, according to our next guests -- they are the all star authors who have been consistently breaking news about Mar-a-Lago for the Miami Herald.

The book is written by four reporters, and we are joined by two of them Sarah Blaskey and Nicholas Nehamas.

Electronic monitoring. Locked-down drug treatment centers. House arrest. Mandated psychiatric treatment. Data-driven surveillance. Extended probation. These are some of the key alternatives held up as cost-effective substitutes for jails and prisons. But many of these so-called reforms actually widen the net, weaving in new strands of punishment and control, and bringing new populations, who would not otherwise have been subject to imprisonment, under physical control by the state.

As mainstream public opinion has begun to turn against mass incarceration, political figures on both sides of the spectrum are pushing for reform. But, though they’re promoted as steps to confront high rates of imprisonment, many of these measures are transforming our homes and communities into prisons instead.

In the book "Prison by Any Other Name," activist journalists Maya Schenwar and Victoria Law reveal the way the kinder, gentler narrative of reform can obscure agendas of social control and challenge us to question the ways we replicate the status quo when pursuing change.

Award-winning writer and public health executive Michelle Bowdler's new memoir, "Is Rape a Crime?," indicts how sexual violence has been addressed for decades in our society, asking whether rape is a crime given that it is the least reported major felony, least successfully prosecuted, and fewer than 3% of reported rapes result in conviction. Cases are closed before they are investigated and DNA evidence sits for years untested and disregarded

Rape in this country is not treated as a crime of brutal violence but often as a question of he said / she said. Bowdler says given all this, it seems fair to ask whether rape is actually a crime.

Michelle Bowdler is the Executive Director of Health & Wellness at Tufts University and, after graduating from the Harvard School of Public Health, has worked on social justice issues related to rape for over a decade. "Is Rape a Crime?" is her first book.

Albany Police Chief Eric Hawkins speaking Wednesday afternoon at the corner of First and Quail Streets
Lucas Willard / WAMC

During a streak of gun violence Wednesday, Albany Mayor Kathy Sheehan asked State Police and the Albany County Sheriff’s Office to step up patrols in the city.

Wikimedia Commons/Diego Grez

Police in Albany are investigating a homicide that occurred Saturday night on North Lake Avenue.

wikipedia commons

A man accused of abducting his son in the Saratoga County Town of Clifton Park Friday faces felony kidnapping and burglary charges. 

A man who pulled a gun on Newburgh City Police late Friday afternoon was shot and killed by officers.

C. J. Box is the author of twenty Joe Pickett novels, five stand-alone novels, and a story collection. He has won the Edgar, Anthony, Macavity, Gumshoe, and Barry Awards, as well as the French Prix Calibre .38, and has been a Los Angeles Times Book Prize finalist. A Wyoming native, Box has also worked on a ranch and as a small-town newspaper reporter and editor.

In "Long Range," Joe Pickett is asked to join the rescue efforts for the victim of a startling grizzly attack, he reluctantly leaves his district behind. One survivor of the grizzly's rampage tells a bizarre story, but just as Joe begins to suspect the attack is not what it seems, he is brought home by an emergency on his own turf. Someone has targeted a prominent local judge, shooting at him from a seemingly impossible distance. While the judge was not hit, his wife is severely wounded, and it is up to Joe to find answers--and the shooter.

Crime Scene Tape
Alan Cleaver/Flickr

Gunfire erupted at a Connecticut nightclub early Sunday morning, killing a man and wounding four other people, police said.

CSIprotect

The New York State Sheriffs’ Association is rolling out a new "Crime Suppression Initiative."

Albany Mayor Kathy Sheehan says the city is filing a nusiance complaint against a West Hill business at 36 Judson Street.
WAMC photo by Dave Lucas

After a fourth shooting death this year outside a corner store in the city, Albany officials are taking steps to close the business.

2nd & Judson Streets
Google Maps

Albany's fourth homicide of the year sent city officials knocking on residents’ doors.

WAMC photo by Dave Lucas

City officials in Troy are looking for answers about malfunctioning police cameras. It comes amid community concern over a recent uptick in crime. 

An informational meeting aiming to address what's described as "a rash of violence in Lansingburgh" is scheduled for tonight in Troy.

A former aide to Robert F. Kennedy and senior official in the Clinton administration, Peter Edelman has devoted his life to understanding the causes of poverty.

In one of the richest countries on Earth it has effectively become a crime to be poor. For example, in Ferguson, Missouri, the U.S. Department of Justice didn’t just expose racially biased policing; it also exposed exorbitant fines and fees for minor crimes that mainly hit the city’s poor, African American population, resulting in jail by the thousands. As Peter Edelman explains in "Not a Crime to Be Poor," in fact Ferguson is everywhere: the debtors’ prisons of the twenty-first century.

Peter Edelman is the Carmack Waterhouse Professor of Law and Public Policy and the faculty director of the Center on Poverty and Inequality at Georgetown University Law Center.

Thomas Abt is a senior research fellow at the Harvard Kennedy School of Government. Previously, he served as a policymaker in Barack Obama's Justice Department and worked for New York governor Andrew Cuomo, overseeing all criminal justice and homeland security agencies in the state.

Urban violence is one of the most divisive and allegedly intractable issues of our time. But as Thomas Abt shows in "Bleeding Out: The Devastating Consequences of Urban Violence--and a Bold New Plan for Peace in the Streets," we actually possess all the tools necessary to stem violence in our cities.

Coupling the latest social science with firsthand experience as a crime-fighter, Abt proposes a relentless focus on violence itself -- not drugs, gangs, or guns. Because violence is "sticky," clustering among small groups of people and places, it can be predicted and prevented using a series of smart-on-crime strategies that do not require new laws or big budgets.

According to police, a man killed himself in a stolen pickup truck outside of a Fulton County convenience store Saturday.

Schenectady County DA Robert Carney speaks to the press
Lucas Willard / WAMC

A grand jury has handed up indictments charging four people in connection with two shooting incidents in Schenectady County.

We call it domestic violence. We call it private violence. Sometimes we call it intimate terrorism. But whatever we call it, we generally do not believe it has anything at all to do with us, despite the World Health Organization deeming it a “global epidemic.” In America, domestic violence accounts for 15 percent of all violent crime, and yet it remains locked in silence, even as its tendrils reach unseen into so many of our most pressing national issues, from our economy to our education system, from mass shootings to mass incarceration to #MeToo. We still have not taken the true measure of this problem.

In "No Visible Bruises," journalist Rachel Louise Snyder gives context for what we don't know we're seeing. She frames this urgent and immersive account of the scale of domestic violence in our country around key stories that explode the common myths-that if things were bad enough, victims would just leave; that a violent person cannot become nonviolent; that shelter is an adequate response; and most insidiously that violence inside the home is a private matter, sealed from the public sphere and disconnected from other forms of violence.

Rebecca Godfrey is an award-winning novelist and journalist. Her first novel, “The Torn Skirt,” was a national bestseller and a finalist for the Ethel Wilson Fiction Prize.

“Under The Bridge,” Godfrey’s shocking true story of a group of teenagers who savagely beat a classmate to death and then tried to cover up the crime, received one of Canada’s largest literary awards, the British Columbia Award for Canadian Nonfiction, as well as the Arthur Ellis Award for Excellence in Crime Writing. “Under the Bridge” is now available in paperback.

Rebecca Godfrey will talk with author Gary Shteyngart at Oblong Books in Rhinebeck, New York this Saturday at 6 p.m.

Mugshots of Jesse James Breault and Ashley Nicole Bell
Warren County Sheriff's Office

Two people have been charged in connection with the death of a Queensbury man.

Guilderland Police have provided more details on two recent shooting deaths.

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