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  • Emmy, Golden Globe, and Screen Actors Guild award winner, Julianna Margulies has achieved success in television, theater, and film and starred in two classic series: “ER” and “The Good Wife.” As a bubbly child, Julianna was bestowed with the family nickname “Sunshine Girl,” also the title of her new memoir.
  • David Sipress, a dreamer and obsessive drawer living with his Upper West Side family in the age of JFK and Sputnik, goes hazy when it comes to the ceaselessly imparted lessons-on-life from his meticulous father and the angsty expectations of his migraine-prone mother. With wry and brilliantly observed prose, Sipress paints his hapless place in the family, from the time he is tricked by his unreliable older sister into rocketing his pet turtle out his twelfth-floor bedroom window, to the moment he walks away from a Harvard PhD program in Russian history to begin his life as a professional cartoonist. His book is "What's So Funny?: A Cartoonist's Memoir."
  • Through his print-based collages and sculptures, Yashua Klos explores the intersections among the human form, natural elements, the built environment, and social hierarchies. His practice employs a process of collaging woodblock prints to engage ideas about Blackness and maleness as identities that are both fragmented and constructed.His recent work takes on personal histories of race, identity, and familial ties. For the exhibition Yashua Klos: OUR LABOUR, curated by Johnson-Pote Director at The Wellin, Tracy Adler, the artist is creating an entirely new body of site-responsive collages and sculptures, and collaborating with Hamilton College students on a large-scale, collage-based wall installation at the Ruth and Elmer Wellin Museum of Art at Hamilton College in Clinton, NY through June 12.
  • In 1986, when her mother died at the age of sixty-four, Eleanor Reissa went through all of her belongings. In the back of her mother’s lingerie drawer, she found an old leather purse. Inside that purse was a large wad of folded papers. They were letters. Fifty-six of them. In German. Written in 1949. Letters from her father to her mother, when they were courting. Just four years earlier, he had fought to stay alive in Auschwitz and on the Death March -- while she had spent the war years suffering in Uzbekistan. Thirty years later, Eleanor finally had the letters translated. The particulars of those letters sent her off on an unimaginable adventure into the past.
  • Angélique Kidjo has cross-pollinated the West African traditions of her childhood in Benin with elements of American R&B, funk and jazz, as well as influences from Europe and Latin America. Kidjo also travels the world advocating on behalf of children in her capacity as a UNICEF and OXFAM goodwill Ambassador and created her own charitable foundation, Batonga, dedicated to support the education of young girls in Africa. The global superstar and four-time Grammy Award winner now stars in "Yemandja," a new music theater work that is a family drama and historical thriller infused with Greek tragedy and themes of love, betrayal, honor, free will, and the horror and injustice of slavery. Named for a Yoruban deity, this MASS MoCA co-commission a parable about gods and humans that illuminates through song what can happen when people are robbed of their culture. The musical will be performed at MASS MoCA on March 4 and 5.
  • Brendan Slocumb’s debut thriller, “The Violin Conspiracy,” is a page-turner about a Black classical musician’s desperate quest to recover his lost family heirloom violin on the eve of the most prestigious musical competition in the world.
  • Huma Abedin, political strategist and vice chair of Hillary Clinton’s 2016 presidential campaign, is the author of the new memoir "Both/And: A Life in Many Worlds." Abedin tells the remarkable story of her Indian and Pakistani family, her Muslim faith, her Saudi Arabian childhood, her 1996 White House internship with then-First Lady Hillary Clinton, and her subsequent career as personal aide, trusted advisor, Middle East expert, and chief of staff for the former New York Senator.
  • Born and raised in Gloversville, New York, Pulitzer-Prize winning novelist Richard Russo returns to that place in his new Scribd essay, "Marriage Story: An American Memoir." The essay chronicles his parents’ lives and why their marriage foundered.
  • New York Times best-selling novelist Imbolo Mbue’s new novel, "How Beautiful We Were," is a sweeping, wrenching story about the collision of a small African village and an American oil company.
  • Film historian Jeremy Arnold’s new book, "Christmas in the Movies: 30 Classics to Celebrate the Season," showcases the very best among this uniquely spirited strain of cinema. Each film is profiled on what makes it a "Christmas movie," along with behind-the-scenes stories of its production, reception, and legacy.