The Roundtable | WAMC

The Roundtable

Weekdays, 9:00 a.m. - 12:00 p.m.

Credit Peter Steiner

 WAMC's The Roundtable is an award-winning, nationally recognized eclectic talk program. The show airs from 9 a.m. to noon each weekday and features news, interviews, in-depth discussion, music, and much (much) more! Hosted by Joe Donahue and produced by Sarah LaDuke, The Roundtable tackles serious and lighthearted subjects, looking to explore the many facets of the human condition with civility, respect and responsibility.

The show's hallmark is thoughtful interviews with A-list newsmakers, authors, artists, sports figures, actors, and people with interesting stories to tell. Since hitting the airwaves in May of 2001, The Roundtable has interviewed the likes of Arthur Miller, Kurt Vonnegut, Maya Angelou, Madeleine Albright, Jimmy Carter, John McCain, Bob Dole, Steve Martin, James Taylor, Stephen King, Melissa Etheridge, Lin-Manuel Miranda and lots of other really cool people. Plus, Wilco does our theme song. What more can you ask for?

If you would like to be on the show email us at roundtable@wamc.org. Send your comments or questions for The Roundtable Panel to panel@wamc.org

The Roundtable is also available as a podcast.

Subscribe on Apple Podcasts Subscribe on Google Podcasts Subscribe on Spotify Subscribe on Stitcher

10:50 - Congressional Corner
11:10 - Earth Wise

Book Picks lists are here.

Music played on the show can be found here.

You may also hear Composers DatebookPulse of the Planet and Sound Beat on The Roundtable.

Graphic for American Music Festival
Albany Symphony / albanysymphony.com

Two-time GRAMMY award-winning Albany Symphony launches its annual American Music Festival celebrating cutting-edge composers and musicians Thursday, June 10 through Sunday June 13 at the Palace Theatre in Albany, New York.

The four-day event will feature William Kanengiser and Scott Tennant of the Los Angeles Guitar Quartet as well as composers Clarice Assad, Molly Joyce, Christopher Theofanidis, Alexis Lamb, Nina Shekhar, and other outstanding musicians.

The Festival also includes a performance by the popular Dogs of Desire; the First Draughts reading session, which give the public a glimpse into the weeklong Composer Workshop for emerging creators; outdoor neighborhood performances and family activities. ASO Maestro David Alan Miller joins us.

United States Senator Charles Schumer
Senator Charles Schumer

Things have changed dramatically for the Democrats since fall.

In today’s Congressional Corner, New York Democrat Chuck Schumer, the Senate Majority Leader, speaks with WAMC’s Alan Chartock.

6/7/21 RT Panel

Jun 7, 2021
Microphone in radio studio
WAMC / WAMC

        The Roundtable Panel: a daily open discussion of issues in the news and beyond.

Today's panelists are WAMC’s Alan Chartock, Immigration attorney and associate with the Albany law firm of Whiteman Osterman & Hanna, Cianna Freeman-Tolbert, Tetherless World Professor of Computer, Web and Cognitive Sciences at RPI and Director of the RPI-IBM Artificial Intelligence research collaboration Jim Hendler, and political consultant and lobbyist Libby Post.

RTPWiR version of the Roundtable Panel graphic (mic in radio studio)
WAMC

  Each weekday morning, WAMC’s President and CEO and Political Observer, Alan Chartock, and Roundtable Host Joe Donahue are joined by various experts, journalists, educators, and commentators to discuss current events. 

On Roundtable Panel: The Week in Review, we feature your favorite panelists discussing the most important issues of the week.

"Let's Talk about Hard Things" Book cover
Simon & Schuster / Simon & Schuster

Anna Sale is the creator and host of "Death, Sex & Money," the award-winning podcast from WNYC Studios, where she’s been doing interviews about “the things we think about a lot and need to talk about more” since 2014. Before that, she covered politics for public radio for years.

In her new book "Let’s Talk About Hard Things," Sale uses the best of what she’s learned from her podcast to reveal that when we have the courage to talk about hard things, we learn about ourselves, others, and the world that we make together. Diving into five of the most fraught conversation topics — death, sex, money, family, and identity — she moves between memoir, snapshots of a variety of Americans opening up about their lives, and expert opinions to show why having tough conversations is important and how to do them in a thoughtful and generous way.

Book cover for "By Me Love" by Martha Cooley
Red Hen Press / Red Hen Press

Author Martha Cooley joins us this morning to discuss her new novel, "Buy Me Love," about the eternal confusions of money and our beloved notions of free will as they play out for one woman with a lottery ticket.

Martha Cooley will be the guest for a Northshire Bookstore Virtual event on Tuesday, June 8 with Lynne Sharon Schwartz ("Truthtelling").

Tim Vercellotti
Western New England University / Western New England University

Trumpism has outlasted the Trump White House.

In today’s Congressional Corner, Tim Vercellotti of the Western New England University poll and professor of political science wraps up his conversation with WAMC’s Alan Chartock.

This interview was recorded May 25.

6/4/21 RT Panel

Jun 4, 2021
Microphone in radio studio
WAMC / WAMC

      The Roundtable Panel: a daily open discussion of issues in the news and beyond.

Today's panelists are WAMC’s Alan Chartock, Former EPA Regional Administrator, Visiting Professor at Bennington College, President of Beyond Plastics Judith Enck, Siena College Professor of Economics Aaron Pacitti, and Albany County District Attorney David Soares.

Book cover for "The Engagement"
Pantheon / Pantheon

On June 26, 2015, the U.S. Supreme Court ruled that state bans on gay marriage were unconstitutional, making same-sex unions legal across the United States.

But the road to that momentous decision was much longer than many know. In her new book, "The Engagement: America's Quarter-Century Struggle Over Same-Sex Marriage," Sasha Issenberg vividly guides us through same-sex marriage’s unexpected path from the unimaginable to the inevitable.

Sasha Issenberg is the author of three previ¬ous books, including "The Victory Lab: The Secret Science of Winning Campaigns." He is the Wash¬ington correspondent at Monocle and teaches in the political science department at UCLA.

Book covers for the books listed below on this page
provided - assorted publishers / provided - assorted publishers

This week's Book Picks come from Kira Wizner of Merritt Bookstore in Millbrook, New York.

List:
"The World Gives Way: A Novel" by Marissa Levien
"How the Word Is Passed: A Reckoning with the History of Slavery Across America" by Clint Smith
"Early Morning Riser: A Novel" by Katherine Heiny
"The Copenhagen Trilogy: Childhood; Youth; Dependency" by Tove Ditlevsen
"We Are What We Eat: A Slow Food Manifesto" by Alice Waters "Group: How One Therapist and a Circle of Strangers Saved My Life" by Christie Tate
"Somebody's Daughter: A Memoir" by Ashley C. Ford
"In the Heights: Finding Home" by Lin-Manuel Miranda, Quiara Alegria Hudes and Jeremy McCarter
"The Menopause Manifesto" by Jen Gunter
"A Sunday in Ville-d’Avray" by Dominique Barbéris translated by John Cullen

Tim Vercellotti
Western New England University / Western New England University

Elizabeth Warren is back in the Senate after her presidential campaign.

In today’s Congressional Corner, Tim Vercellotti of the Western New England University poll and professor of political science continues his conversation with WAMC’s Alan Chartock.

This interview was recorded May 25.

6/3/21 RT Panel

Jun 3, 2021
Microphone in radio studio
WAMC / WAMC

The Roundtable Panel: a daily open discussion of issues in the news and beyond.

Today's panelists are WAMC’s Alan Chartock, Albany Chief City Auditor Dorcey Applyrs, Siena College Professor of Comparative Politics Vera Eccarius-Kelly, and Publisher Emeritus of The Daily Freeman Ira Fusfeld.

"Choutpatte" 2017 - Claude Lalanne, French, 1925-2019; galvanized copper, 4 1/2 x 4 7/8 x 4 in. Lent by : Private Collection; 2021 Artists Rights Society (ARS), New York/ADAGP, Paris.
Thomas Clark / clarkart.edu

The Clark Art Institute's exhibition "Claude & François-Xavier Lalanne: Nature Transformed" is the first American museum exhibition of the French artists' work in over forty years. Les Lalanne’s flora and fauna inspired sculptures fill a bright gallery at The Clark -- with a few pieces installed outdoors nearby.

“Nature Transformed” was curated for The Clark by Kathleen M. Morris, Marx Director of Collections and Exhibitions and curator of decorative arts and is scheduled to be on view in Williamstown, Massachusetts through October 31, 2001.

Sculpture by Tom Fruin on Matrimony Hill
Tom Fruin / beekman1802.com

In celebration of Pride Month at Upstate New York's Beekman 1802, they're inviting scores of couples to their farm to say "I do" atop Matrimony Hill inside of a rainbow colored glass house sculpture by artist Tom Fruin.

The Let Love Bloom Wedding Marathon will take place on the Beekman Farm in Sharon Springs, New York on June 26 and 27.

June 26 is the day the Supreme Court legalized gay marriage in June 2015. Brent Ridge and Josh Kilmer-Purcell join us.

Book cover for "Americanon" by Jess McHugh
Dutton / Dutton

Jess McHugh is a writer and researcher whose work has appeared across a variety of national and international publications, including The New York Times, The Wall Street Journal, The Washington Post, The Nation, TIME, The Paris Review, The Guardian, The New Republic, New York Magazine's The Cut, Fortune, Village Voice, The Believer, and Lapham's Quarterly, among others. She has reported stories from four continents on a range of cultural and historical topics, from present-day Liverpool punks to the history of 1960s activists in Greenwich Village.

In her new book, "Americanon: An Unexpected U.S. History In Thirteen Bestselling Books," she explores the true history of thirteen of the nation’s most popular books: simple dictionaries, spellers, almanacs, and how-to manuals. These overlooked standbys are the unexamined touchstones for American cultures and customs.

Tim Vercellotti
Western New England University / Western New England University

Will Massachusetts Governor Charlie Baker seek a third term?

In today’s Congressional Corner, Tim Vercellotti of the Western New England University poll and professor of political science speaks with WAMC’s Alan Chartock.

This interview was recorded May 25.

6/2/21 RT Panel

Jun 2, 2021
Microphone in radio studio
WAMC / WAMC

         The Roundtable Panel: a daily open discussion of issues in the news and beyond.

Today's panelists are WAMC’s Alan Chartock, investigative journalist and UAlbany adjunct professor Rosemary Armao,  Times Union columnist Chris Churchill, and Dean of the College of Emergency Preparedness, Homeland and Cybersecurity at the University at Albany Robert Griffin.

Bookcover for "The Groundbreaking"
Icon Books Ltd / Icon Books Ltd

  On 31 May 1921, in the city of Tulsa, Oklahoma, a mob of white men and women reduced a prosperous African American community, known as Black Wall Street, to rubble, leaving countless dead and unaccounted for, and thousands of homes and businesses destroyed.

But along with the bodies, they buried the secrets of the crime.  Scott Ellsworth, a native of Tulsa, became determined to unearth the secrets of his home town. Now, nearly 40 years after his first major historical account of the massacre ("Death in a Promised Land: The Tulsa Race Riot of 1921"), Ellsworth returns to the city in search of answers.

Book cover for The 1921 Tulsa Race Massacre
University of Oklahoma Press / University of Oklahoma Press

On the evening of May 31, 1921, and in the early morning hours of June 1, several thousand white citizens and authorities violently attacked the African American Greenwood District of Tulsa, Oklahoma. In the course of some twelve hours of mob violence, white Tulsans reduced one of the nation’s most prosperous black communities to rubble and killed an estimated 300 people, mostly African Americans.

In "The 1921 Tulsa Race Massacre: A Photographic History," Historian and Black Studies professor Karlos K. Hill presents a range of photographs taken before, during, and after the massacre, mostly by white photographers.

Karlos K. Hill is Associate Professor and Chair of the Clara Luper Department of African and African American Studies at the University of Oklahoma and the author of "Beyond the Rope: The Impact of Lynching on Black Culture and Memory."

Given unprecedented times, The Food Pantries for the Capital District is working to ensure that our local food pantries are prepared in the face of circumstances which are devastating to the most vulnerable community members.

With schools now re-opened and soon closing for the summer, hourly and low wage workers losing income, businesses still hurting, and seniors feeling isolated: local food pantries are able to help.

Natasha Pernicka is the Executive Director of The Food Pantries for the Capital District.

6/1/21 RT Panel

Jun 1, 2021
Microphone in radio studio
WAMC / WAMC

         The Roundtable Panel: a daily open discussion of issues in the news and beyond.

Today's panelists are WAMC’s Alan Chartock, investigative journalist and UAlbany adjunct professor Rosemary Armao, and counter-terrorism expert and best-selling author Malcolm Nance.

RTPWiR version of the Roundtable Panel graphic (mic in radio studio)
WAMC

Each weekday morning, WAMC’s President and CEO and Political Observer, Alan Chartock, and Roundtable Host Joe Donahue are joined by various experts, journalists, educators, and commentators to discuss current events. 

On Roundtable Panel: The Week in Review, we feature your favorite panelists discussing the most important issues of the week.

5/28/21 RT Panel

May 28, 2021
Microphone in radio studio
WAMC / WAMC

          The Roundtable Panel: a daily open discussion of issues in the news and beyond.

Today's panelists are WAMC’s Alan Chartock and political consultant and lobbyist Libby Post.

We are also raising money for WAMC and a lot of the Panel time is devoted to that.

Joe Donahue and Eric Carle
WAMC / WAMC

Eric Carle's picture books were often about insects: spiders, ladybugs, crickets, and of course - that famous caterpillar, all as colorful and friendly as Carle himself. "The Very Hungry Caterpillar" came out in 1969 and became one of the bestselling children's books of all time. 

Carle passed away on Sunday at his summer studio in Northampton, Massachusetts. He was 91 years old. 

Over the course of his career, Carle sullustrated more than 70 books for kids. 

In 2002, Carle and his wife, Barbara, founded the Eric Carle Museum of Picture Book Art in Amherst, Massachusetts - inspired by the picture book museums they'd toured on visit to Japan. 

Joe spoke with Eric Carle at the museum in 2011 on the occassion of the release of his book "The Artist Who Painted a Blue Horse." We are that interview today, in memoriam.

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