The Roundtable | WAMC

The Roundtable

Weekdays, 9:00 a.m. - 12:00 p.m.

Credit Peter Steiner

 WAMC's The Roundtable is an award-winning, nationally recognized eclectic talk program. The show airs from 9 a.m. to noon each weekday and features news, interviews, in-depth discussion, music, and much (much) more! Hosted by Joe Donahue and produced by Sarah LaDuke, The Roundtable tackles serious and lighthearted subjects, looking to explore the many facets of the human condition with civility, respect and responsibility.

The show's hallmark is thoughtful interviews with A-list newsmakers, authors, artists, sports figures, actors, and people with interesting stories to tell. Since hitting the airwaves in May of 2001, The Roundtable has interviewed the likes of Arthur Miller, Kurt Vonnegut, Maya Angelou, Madeleine Albright, Jimmy Carter, John McCain, Bob Dole, Steve Martin, James Taylor, Stephen King, Melissa Etheridge, Lin-Manuel Miranda and lots of other really cool people. Plus, Wilco does our theme song. What more can you ask for?

If you would like to be on the show email us at roundtable@wamc.org. Send your comments or questions for The Roundtable Panel to panel@wamc.org

The Roundtable is also available as a podcast.  Subscribe today!

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10:50 - Congressional Corner
11:10 - Earth Wise

Book Picks lists are here.

Music played on the show can be found here.

You may also hear Composers DatebookPulse of the Planet and Sound Beat on The Roundtable.

Trial by Fire book cover
MacMillan Publishers / MacMillan Publishers

All it took for a hundred people to die during a show by the hair metal band Great White was a sudden burst from four giant sparklers that ignited the acoustical foam lining the Station nightclub. But who was at fault? And who would pay? This being Rhode Island, the two questions wouldn't necessarily have the same answer.

"Trial By Fire" by Scott James is the story of the fire's aftermath because while the fire, one of America's deadliest, lasted minutes, the search for the truth would take years.

Bestselling author and three-time Emmy Award-winning journalist Scott James investigates all the central figures, including the band's manager and lead singer, the fire inspector, the maker of the acoustical foam, as well as the brothers.

Book cover for "Made Men"
Hanover Square Press / Hanover Square Press

For the thirtieth anniversary of its premiere, film critic Glenn Kenny has written an immersive history behind Martin Scorsese’s signature film "Goodfellas," hailed by critics as the greatest mob movie ever made.

David Hawkings
provided / provided

Will Washington work again in 2021?

In today’s Congressional Corner, David Hawkings of The Fulcrum wraps up his conversation with WAMC’s Alan Chartock.

11/12/20 Panel

Nov 12, 2020
Microphone in radio studio
WAMC / WAMC

    The Roundtable Panel: a daily open discussion of issues in the news and beyond.

Today's panelists are WAMC’s Alan Chartock, Peabody and Emmy Award-winning journalist Linda Ellerbee, Publisher Emeritus of The Daily Freeman Ira Fusfeld, and UAlbany Lecturer in Africana Studies Jennifer Burns.

Artwork from the book cover of "The Tinderbox"
Aethon Books / aethonbooks.com

Actor Lou Diamond Phillips is putting his screenwriting talents to work with his debut novel "The Tinderbox: Soldier of Indira," a science fantasy retelling of the Hans Christian Andersen tale of the same name. It is a fairy-tale that tackles issues of racism, power and prophecy in an alien world.

Lou Diamond Phillips is currently starring in the FOX series “Prodigal Son,” having recently starred on the Netflix series, “Longmire,” based on the Walt Longmire mystery novels by Craig Johnson. He is a Tony nominated actor whose breakthrough films included: "La Bamba," "Young Guns" and "Stand and Deliver."

Book cover for Pappyland
Penguin/Random House / Penguin/Random House

As a journalist said of Pappy Van Winkle, "You could call it bourbon, or you could call it a $5,000 bottle of liquified, barrel-aged unobtanium." Julian Van Winkle, the third-generation head of his family's business, is now thought of as something like the Buddha of Bourbon - Booze Yoda, as Wright Thompson calls him. He is swarmed wherever he goes, and people stand in long lines to get him to sign their bottles of Pappy Van Winkle Family Reserve, the whiskey he created to honor his grandfather, the founder of the family concern. A bottle of the 23-year-old Pappy starts at $3000 on the internet. As Julian is the first to say, things have gone completely nuts.

Wright Thompson is a senior writer for ESPN and his new book is "Pappyland: A Story of Family, Fine Bourbon, and the Things That Last."

David Hawkings
provided / provided

“Never give in – never, never, never, never.” Churchill or Trump?

In today’s Congressional Corner, David Hawkings of The Fulcrum continues his conversation with WAMC’s Alan Chartock.

11/11/20 Panel

Nov 11, 2020
Microphone in radio studio
WAMC / WAMC

      The Roundtable Panel: a daily open discussion of issues in the news and beyond.

Today's panelists are WAMC’s Alan Chartock,  UAlbany Lecturer in Africana Studies Jennifer Burns, Dean of the College of Emergency Preparedness, Homeland Cybersecurity at the University at Albany Robert Griffin, Times Union columnist Chris Churchill, and investigative journalist and UAlbany adjunct professor Rosemary Armao.

A photo of the book "Leave It As It Is" by David Gessner on a audio board
Jesse King / WAMC

David Gessner is the author of the New York Times bestselling book All The Wild That Remains. His latest work, Leave It As It Is: A Journey Through Theodore Roosevelt’s American Wilderness, considers the environmental work of America’s 26th president. 

Book covers for the books listed below on this page
Various publisher websites

  Jacqueline Kellachan and James Conrad from The Golden Notebook in Woodstock, NY joins us with this week's Book Picks.

List:
The Cold Millions" by Jess Walter
"Right Place, Right Time: The Life of a Rock and Roll Photographer" by Bob Gruen
"Memorial" by Bryan Washington
"She Come By It Natural: Dolly Parton and The Women Who Lived Her Sings" by Sarah Smarsh
"White Ivy" by Susie Yang
"150 Glimpses of The Beatles" by Craig Brown
"All the Broken People" by Leah Konen
"Everything Comes Next - Collected & New Poems" by Naomi Shihab Nye

David Hawkings
provided / provided

American voters are making a change at the top.

In today’s Congressional Corner, David Hawkings of The Fulcrum speaks with WAMC’s Alan Chartock.

11/10/20 Panel

Nov 10, 2020
Microphone in radio studio
WAMC / WAMC

       The Roundtable Panel: a daily open discussion of issues in the news and beyond.

Today's panelists are WAMC’s Alan Chartock, Albany Law School professor and director of the Immigration Law Clinic Sarah Rogerson, Lecturer and Adjunct Professor in Communications for SUNY New Paltz and RPI Terry Gipson, and investigative journalist and UAlbany adjunct professor Rosemary Armao.

Answers In The Form Of Questions book cover
Twelve Books, Grand Central Publishing

This year has been a challenging time of transition for an American institution that is famous for its conservative consistency across the decades. That’s right: “Jeopardy!” This interview was recorded just before Sunday's news that longtime host Alex Trebek died at age 80 of pancreatic cancer.

Book cover for "Nose Dive"
Penguin/Random House / Penguin/Random House

Harold McGee writes about the science of food and cooking. He is the author of the award-winning classic "On Food and Cooking: The Science and Lore of the Kitchen and Keys to Good Cooking: A Guide to Making the Best of Foods and Recipes," and a former columnist for The New York Times. He has been named food writer of the year by Bon Appétit magazine and to the Time 100, an annual list of the world's most influential people. Since 2010, he has been a visiting lecturer for Harvard University's course "Science & Cooking: From Haute Cuisine to Soft Matter Science."

In his new book "Nose Dive," he takes us on a sensory-filled adventure, from the sulfurous nascent earth more than four billion years ago, to the sweetly fragrant Tian Shan mountain range north of the Himalayas, to the keyboard of your laptop, where trace notes of formaldehyde escape between the keys. We'll sniff the ordinary (wet pavement and cut grass) and extraordinary (fresh bread and chocolate), the delightful (roses and vanilla) and the unpleasant (spoiled meat and rotten eggs). We'll smell each other. We'll smell ourselves.

11/9/20 Panel

Nov 9, 2020
Microphone in radio studio
WAMC / WAMC

   The Roundtable Panel: a daily open discussion of issues in the news and beyond.

Today's panelists are WAMC’s Alan Chartock, immigration attorney and associate with the Albany law firm of Whiteman Osterman & Hanna, Cianna Freeman-Tolbert, Tetherless World Professor of Computer, Web and Cognitive Sciences at RPI and Director of the RPI-IBM Artificial Intelligence research collaboration Jim Hendler, political consultant and lobbyist, Libby Post, and counter-terrorism expert and best-selling author Malcolm Nance.

11/6/20 Panel

Nov 6, 2020
Microphone in radio studio
WAMC / WAMC

    The Roundtable Panel: a daily open discussion of issues in the news and beyond.

Today's panelists are WAMC’s Alan Chartock, Former EPA Regional Administrator, Visiting Professor at Bennington College, President of Beyond Plastics Judith Enck, Siena College Economic Professor Aaron Pacitti, and Albany County District Attorney David Soares.

Sarah Rogerson
albanylaw.edu / albanylaw.edu

Donald Trump campaigned for the presidency in 2016 with a pledge to bring down illegal immigration, famously blaming undocumented migrants from Mexico for a host of problems, including drugs and crime. In the four years since, how has this rhetoric translated into a wider immigration policy?

Immigration has not been a central theme of the race between Mr. Trump and former Vice President Joe Biden, the Democratic nominee, but the future of some of the president’s hard-line policies at the border will be determined by the final results.

Albany Law School professor and director of the Immigration Law Clinic, Sarah Rogerson joins us to discuss.

There was a fair amount of attention given before Election Day to what impact Latino voters would have on the presidential election.

Now that we know Florida and Texas went for President Trump and Arizona is still not called, though it is leaning in former vice president Joe Biden’s favor, one thing that is clear is that there is a lot left to learn about how Latinos in America engage in politics.

According to some exit polls, President Trump captured as much as 36% of the Latino vote Tuesday night. Leading to this question - Why did so many Latinos vote for Donald Trump? To investigate – we welcome Dan Irizarry, chairman of Capital District Latinos.

Tim Vercellotti
Western New England University / Western New England University

The polling industry and election forecasters suffered another embarrassing election night that will call into question the usefulness of public opinion surveys and horse race political coverage that appeared to once again underestimate President Trump’s support.

Votes are still being tallied, meaning the final verdict on polling and forecasting may not be known for several days, but the results so far are much closer than most analysts predicted in the lead-up to Election Day.

The polls in Florida, Iowa, Ohio and Texas — all states won by President Trump — were mostly wrong, though Democratic nominee Joe Biden appears to have the upper hand in the race for 270 electoral votes and is the favorite to be the next president.

Tim Vercellotti of the Western New England University poll and professor of political science joins us this morning to talk about what went right and what went wrong on Tuesday.

New York Governor Andrew Cuomo
Pat Bradley / WAMC

WAMC's Alan Chartock speaks with New York Gov. Andrew Cuomo on Nov. 5, 2020.

11/5/20 Panel

Nov 5, 2020
Microphone in radio studio
WAMC / WAMC

  The Roundtable Panel: a daily open discussion of issues in the news and beyond.

Today's panelists are WAMC’s Alan Chartock, Peabody and Emmy Award-winning journalist Linda Ellerbee, Engagement Editor for the Seattle Times Education Lab Jenn Smith, Tetherless World Professor of Computer, Web and Cognitive Sciences at RPI and Director of the RPI-IBM Artificial Intelligence research collaboration Jim Hendler, and Siena College Professor of Comparative Politics Vera Eccarius-Kelly.

Roundtable Music 11/5

Nov 5, 2020

11/4/20 Panel

Nov 4, 2020
Microphone in radio studio
WAMC / WAMC

     The Roundtable Panel: a daily open discussion of issues in the news and beyond.

Today's panelists are WAMC’s Alan Chartock,  UAlbany Lecturer in Africana Studies Jennifer Burns, Dean of the College of Emergency Preparedness, Homeland Cybersecurity at the University at Albany Robert Griffin, Times Union columnist Chris Churchill, and investigative journalist and UAlbany adjunct professor Rosemary Armao.

Roundtable Music 11/4

Nov 4, 2020

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