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Psychology Professor Sandra Graham-Bermann discusses PTSD and school shootings

While we talk a lot about gun culture, safety in schools, and what to do to prevent the next school shooting – we want to talk about what impact these shootings are having on our children – those directly impacted and those who see it all around them.

University of Michigan psychology professor Sandra Graham-Bermann, whose research includes traumatic stress reactions in children exposed to violence such as the school shooting yesterday, says schools and parents can offer support to the students during the grieving process, but long-term symptoms that become post-traumatic stress disorder (PTSD) may require professional counseling.

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