bipartisanship

Bookstores and libraries have long played a central role in fostering a deeper appreciation of knowledge, and in lifelong learning. Increasingly, these places are also filling another critical need in our communities, by providing a haven for those seeking a communal connection in an ever-more isolated world.

But, how is this all playing out in our current fractured political climate? We have two guests to discuss this with us this morning. Chris Morrow is owner of Northshire Bookstores in Manchester Center, Vermont and Saratoga Springs, New York and he joins us along with the CEO of the American Booksellers Association – Oren Teicher.

Ian Bremmer is the president and founder of Eurasia Group, the leading global political risk research and consulting firm.

Those who championed globalization once promised a world of winners, one in which free trade would lift all the world's boats, and extremes of left and right would give way to universally embraced liberal values. The past few years have shattered this fantasy, as those who've paid the price for globalism's gains have turned to populist and nationalist politicians to express fury at the political, media, and corporate elites they blame for their losses.

In his new book, "Us vs. Them: The Failure of Globalism," Bremmer writes that globalism creates plenty of both winners and losers, and those who've missed out want to set things right.

Ruy Teixeira is a Senior Fellow at the Center for American Progress and author or co-author of several books on American politics.

The words “optimism” and “the left” do not seem to go together very well these days. The dominant view on the left--reinforced by the election of Donald Trump--is as follows: (1) progress in today’s world has largely stopped and in many ways reversed; (2) the left is weak and at the mercy of a rapacious capitalism and a marauding right; and (3) the outlook for the future is bleak, with ordinary citizens suffering even more deprivation and the planet itself sliding inexorably toward catastrophe.

Teixeira's new book, The Optimistic Leftist: Why the 21st Century Will Be Better Than You Think, maintains that all these propositions are wrong. It is not the case that progress has stopped. Today, we live in a freer, more democratic, less violent and more prosperous world than we ever have before.

Congresswoman Elizabeth Esty
Congresswoman Elizabeth Esty

Is bipartisanship still possible in Washington?

In today’s Congressional Corner, Connecticut Congresswoman Elizabeth Esty, a Democrat from the fifth district, speaks with WAMC’s Alan Chartock.

Congressman Paul Tonko
Congressman Paul Tonko

American politics has become so sour, it took the shooting of a member of Congress to renew calls for bipartisanship.

In today’s Congressional Corner, New York Congressman Paul Tonko, a Democrat from the 20th district, speaks with WAMC’s Alan Chartock.

  Congress’ unpopularity has hung over the summer recess.

In today’s Congressional Corner, Tim Vercellotti, director of the Western New England University poll and professor of political science, tells WAMC’s Alan Chartock that compromise has become poisonous to many GOP representatives.

    Within a polarized House, one coalition is trying to work across the aisle.

In today’s Congressional Corner, New York Representative Chris Gibson — a Republican from the 19th district — tells WAMC’s Alan Chartock about the No Labels organization.

  Many observers say Washington is as polarized as it has ever been.

In today’s Congressional Corner, New York Representative Sean Patrick Maloney tells WAMC’s Alan Chartock that his work with No Labels aims to keep bipartisanship alive.