Steve Greenberg | WAMC

Steve Greenberg

New York Governor Andrew Cuomo speaking March 25, 2020.
https://www.flickr.com/photos/governorandrewcuomo/49697923781/

New Yorkers are unhappy with embattled New York Governor Andrew Cuomo, but a poll shows they don’t think he should resign.

Siena College Research Institute

A new poll finds 50 percent of New York voters feel Governor Andrew Cuomo should not immediately resign.

Siena College Research Institute

As Governor Andrew Cuomo continues defending his handling of nursing homes during the pandemic, a Siena Poll finds New Yorkers approve of his actions.

Composite Image by Dave Lucas (Jackie Orchard / cdc.gov)

New polls are shining a light on two of the most pressing social issues of our time: COVID and race relations.

Albany NY saw protests and civil unrest in the wake of the George Floyd killing.
WAMC photos by Jackie Orchard

A month after the death of George Floyd in Minneapolis police custody, a Siena College poll finds New Yorkers are troubled by systemic racism and police behavior. But  they don’t support calls to defund the police.

Photo by Pat Bradley

A majority of New Yorkers are behind Democratic efforts to impeach President Donald Trump.

According to a new poll, most registered voters in New York support the plastic bag ban recently passed by the state legislature, but not the banning of mugshots.

Challenger Antonio Delgado and Rep. John Faso
Composite photo by Allison Dunne & Dave Lucas/WAMC

First-term Republican Congressman John Faso holds a slim lead in New York’s 19th Congressional district, according to a Siena College/Spectrum poll released Thursday night.

Siena Poll Shows NY Gov. Cuomo's Favorability Dropping

Feb 12, 2018
Governor Andrew Cuomo
Pat Bradley / WAMC

New York Governor Andrew Cuomo’s poll numbers are down. In fact, according to the latest Siena College poll, the Democrat’s net favorability rating is down 19 points from January to February. His favorable rating is down from 62 percent to 53 percent and his unfavorable rating is up from 30 percent to 40 percent. 

MLK Memorial
WAMC Photo by Dave Lucas

A new Siena Research Institute poll released on this Martin Luther King Day surveyed New Yorkers on race relations, discrimination and sexual harassment. WAMC's Capital Region Bureau Chief Dave Lucas spoke with pollster Steve Greenberg.

NYS Legislature Is More Popular, Poll Finds

Sep 20, 2016
New York State Capitol
Karen DeWitt

The New York State Legislature is more popular these days, according to a Siena College poll.

Greenberg On Latest Siena Poll Results

Jun 16, 2014

Steve Greenberg discusses Siena College's poll results for the New York State gubernatorial race. Results show Governor Cuomo with a lead over Westchester County Executive Rob Astorino.

Governor Andrew Cuomo
Office of Governor Andrew Cuomo

A new poll finds that New York Governor Andrew Cuomo is still feeling the fallout from the demise of his Moreland Commission, a panel that was investigating corruption in the legislature. Cuomo disbanded the commission as part of the state budget deal.

Office of New York Governor Andrew Cuomo

A new poll finds New York Governor Andrew Cuomo in a double-digit lead against his republican opponent for the fall elections. But the survey finds that ratio changes, if a progressive third party candidate emerges.

Office of Governor Andrew Cuomo

A new poll finds that New York Governor Andrew Cuomo is well positioned to win re-election next year, but there are some weaknesses in the governor’s generally positive numbers.

Office of Governor Andrew Cuomo

New York Governor Andrew Cuomo is appointing a new tax cutting commission that he’s charged with finding ways of slicing state revenues by $2 to $3 billion dollars next year.

Cuomo turned to the man who beat his father in the 1994 governor’s race, George Pataki, to co chair the commission. Pataki, a Republican, defeated Mario Cuomo  on a platform that included tax cuts.

Pataki, who says the state “spends too much and costs too much,” says he’s happy to serve on the commission, but at first thought a mistake had been made.