painting

Artist and author, Hudson Talbott, join us now to tell us about his new book, “Picturing America: Thomas Cole and the Birth of American Art.”

It is a fascinating look at artist Thomas Cole's life and takes young readers from his humble beginnings to his development of a new painting style that became America's first formal art movement: the Hudson River school of painting.

Hudson Talbott depicts the immigrant artist falling in love with, and fighting to preserve, his new country.

Talbott has written and illustrated more than 20 children’s books, including Newbery Honor winner “Show Way,” ALA Notable Book and VOYA Honor Book “Leonardo’s Horse” (by Jean Fritz), and “We're Back! A Dinosaur's Story,” which was adapted into an animated film by Steven Spielberg.

Let us now travel to Cooperstown, NY where the Fenimore Art Museum’s new exhibit: “Thomas Cole and the Garden of Eden” is now on display. The exhibition centers on Cole’s masterwork “Expulsion from the Garden of Eden,” lent by the Museum of Fine Arts, Boston, and explores his aspirations for landscape painting at the start of his career in the 1820s and early 1830s.

Sixteen original works, including paintings from the Fenimore’s collection and loans from more than a dozen other institutions and private collectors survey the themes of the Garden of Eden. The exhibition also reveals artists that influenced Cole early in his career, such as Asher B. Durand and Thomas Doughty.

Chris Rossi is the Director of Exhibitions at the Fenimore Art Museum.


  The exhibition, An Inner World: Seventeenth-Century Dutch Genre Painting at The Clark in Williamstown, MA features seven genre paintings by Dutch artists working in or near the city of Leiden in the seventeenth century. Genre paintings, or scenes that take everyday life as their subject matter, flourished in the Dutch Republic in this period.

 

Based around The Clark’s own Girl at a Window by Gerrit Dou, the exhibition is scheduled to be on display through October 1st. We went to the museum recently and spoke with Alexis Goodin, Co-Curator and Curatorial Research Assistant at The Clark.

WAMC photo by Dave Lucas

The Thomas Cole National Historic Site in Catskill is now open for its 2017 season and features two new landmark exhibitions. 

“The Parlors” is an immersive installation that combines technology and meticulous historic restoration of the two parlors of Cole's 1815 Home, the rooms where America's first major art movement was born. It features a stunning discovery revealed during the restoration: the earliest-known, interior decorative painting by an American artist. 

Also, “Sanford R. Gifford in the Catskills” is an exhibition of Catskills paintings of Sanford Robinson Gifford (1823-1880), a leading member of the Hudson River School of landscape painting, who credited Cole’s works with stimulating his interest in landscape painting. Gifford grew up in Hudson, and this is the first such show of this magnitude to take place in the region that inspired Cole and Gifford.

Betsy Jacks, Executive Director of the Thomas Cole National Historic Site, joins us this morning to discuss the opening these two exhibitions and their importance to the history of the region. 

  In this week’s Classical Music According to Yehuda, we continue to learn about the music of Thea Musgrave.

Barn painting by Tom Kerr
Tom Kerr

Here are some numbers for you: It is the 26th Anniversary of the Agricultural Stewardship Association and on October 8th, ASA will present their 15th Annual Landscapes for Landsake Art Sale & Exhibition.

The event is a fundraiser to support local farmland conservation, the show features thirty-one artists whose work is inspired by the region's working landscapes. It takes place in the historic barn at Maple Ridge in the hamlet of Coila, just west of the Village of Cambridge.

Teri Ptacek is Executive Director of the Agricultural Stewardship Association and she joins us along with Dave Horn, a former Board member and Board Chair. Dave was one of the founders of the exhibit and has been critical to the success of the show as an active volunteer for 15 years.

  Splendor, Myth, and Vision: Nudes from the Prado is the current exhibition at The Clark in Williamstown, MA.

The exhibition features twenty-eight Old Master paintings from the Museo Nacional del Prado in Madrid by Titian, Peter Paul Rubens, and many others. The exhibition explores the role of the nude in European painting in the sixteenth and seventeenth centuries and the collecting and display practices of the Spanish royalty.

We are taken on a tour of the exhibition by The Clark's Kathleen Morris, Sylvia and Leonard Marx Director of Collections and Exhibitions and curator of decorative arts; and Lara Yeager-Crasselt, interim curator of paintings and sculpture.

  Abstract Expressionism was the defining movement in American art during the years following World War II, making New York City the center of the international art scene. But, what did it mean? The drips, the spills, the splashes, the blotches of color, the wild spontaneous energy--signifying what?

Richard Klin’s new book Abstract Expressionism For Beginners will not only help you understand, but also appreciate the art of some of the most iconic figures in modern art--Jackson Pollock, Willem de Kooning, Mark Rothko, and others.

Explore their lives and artistic roots, the heady world of Greenwich Village in the 1940s and 1950s, the influence of jazz, the voices of critics, and the enduring legacy of a uniquely inspired group of artists. Richard Klin is a freelance writer and editor and the author of Something to Say: Thoughts on Art and Politics in America. He joins us along with the book's illustrator, Lilly Prince. 

  In 1961, a thief broke into the National Gallery in London and committed the most sensational art heist in British history. He stole the museum’s much prized painting, The Duke of Wellington by Francisco Goya. Despite unprecedented international attention and an unflagging investigation, the case was not solved for four years, and even then, only because the culprit came forward voluntarily. 

Alan Hirch's book is The Duke of Wellington, Kidnapped!: The Incredible True Story of the Art Heist That Shocked a Nation.

 

The Arkell Museum at Canajoharie, NY is presenting the exhibition Circus Circus through October 16th featuring paintings of the American circus by artists from the 1920s and 1930s alongside circus-themed marketing materials used by the Beech-Nut Packaging Company in the 1930s.

 

The circus coming to town was a highly anticipated event in small towns across America, and many artists in the twenties and thirties painted the spectacle of the parade as the circus arrived, and the excitement under the big top. The exhibition includes paintings by Jon Corbino, Ogden Pleissner and Everett Shinn.

 

Images of circus cars, animals and acrobats were also used to market food products during the 1930s. The Beech-Nut Packing Company was one of the companies to use the excitement and nostalgia of the circus to sell its products. They created magazine ads with clowns and circus animals to sell their gum.

 

This circus-themed marketing campaign culminated in the creation of Beech-Nut miniature circuses that traveled across the country in busses, and a miniature circus was displayed in their pavilion at the New York World’s Fair in 1939.

To tell us more about the exhibit we welcome Art Historian Karal Ann Marling and Museum Director and Curator Diane Forsberg.

Georgia By Dawn Tripp

Mar 1, 2016

  In 1916, Georgia O’Keeffe is a young, unknown art teacher when she travels to New York to meet Stieglitz, the famed photographer and art dealer, who has discovered O’Keeffe’s work and exhibits it in his gallery. Their connection is instantaneous. O’Keeffe is quickly drawn into Stieglitz’s sophisticated world, becoming his mistress, protégé, and muse, as their attraction deepens into an intense and tempestuous relationship and his photographs of her, both clothed and nude, create a sensation. 

Winner of the Massachusetts Book Award for fiction, Dawn Tripp is the author of the novels Moon Tide, The Season of Open Water, and Game of Secrets, a Boston Globe bestseller.

Artist Danny Gregory says that you can carve out time for painting and drawing anytime at anytime in your day. He looks to show how making art even for just ten minutes can lead to a richer, more fulfilling life. Gregory’s artistic approach is through bite-sized and easily achievable exercises which he presents in his new book Art Before Breakfast: A Zillion Ways to be More Creative No Matter How Busy You Are.

  Arrangement in Grey and Black No. 1 (Portrait of the Artist's Mother) by James McNeill Whistler is one of the most renowned works of art by an American artist. It is considered by many to be the most important American painting not on American soil.

Better known as Whistler’s Mother, the painting has been owned by the French state since 1891 and is in the collection of the Musée d'Orsay in Paris. The Clark Art Institute in Williamstown, Massachusetts, presents the painting as the centerpiece of an exhibition on view at the Lunder Center at Stone Hill through September 27th.

Jay Clark, The Clark’s Manton Curator of Prints, Drawings, and Photographs takes us on a tour of the exhibition.

Creating Landscapes in the Landscape, the Third Annual Plein Air Painting event hosted in collaboration by The Olana Partnership and the Columbia County Council on the Arts will take place at the Olana State Historic Site Thursday, October 16th through Saturday, October 18th.

    Based on author Barbara Diane Barry’s popular course Art for Self-Discovery and supported by research in psychology and the science of brain function her book: Painting Your Way Out of a Corner guides readers through the process of overcoming blocks and expressing themselves freely in painting.

Through a series of exercises that emphasize improvisation and risk-taking, readers will learn how to quiet their inner critics and strengthen their creativity. The more we learn to play and accept whatever appears on the page, the more we are able to try new things in life.

Barbara Diane Barry is an artist and art teacher in New York City. Under the educational outreach program at Symphony Space, she teaches in public schools throughout NYC's five boroughs and gives tours in the city’s finest museums.

Olana is the 250-acre home of Frederick Edwin Church, the famous landscape painter of the 19th century and the master of America's first school of painting, the Hudson River School.

The beautiful Persian style estate is situated outside of Hudson, NY.

"Maine Sublime: Frederic Edwin Church's Landscapes of Mount Desert and Mount Katahdin" is a new exhibition currently on display at Olana. The show includes 10 oil and 13 pencil sketches from the Olana collection that celebrate the glories of Maine scenery. Many are on public view for the first time.

Sara Griffen, Director of the Olana Partnership and Evelyn Trebilcock, Curator at Olana join us to tell us more.