outdoors

Richard Louv’s landmark book, "Last Child in the Woods," inspired an international movement to connect children and nature. Now Louv redefines the future of human-animal coexistence. "Our Wild Calling" explores these powerful and mysterious bonds and how they can transform our mental, physical, and spiritual lives, serve as an antidote to the growing epidemic of human loneliness, and help us tap into the empathy required to preserve life on Earth.

"Our Wild Calling" makes the case for protecting, promoting, and creating a sustainable and shared habitat for all creatures: not out of fear, but out of love. The book looks to point us toward what look for in the age of technology: real connection.

Why spend countless hours indoors in front of screens when being in nature feels so good? In learning why and how to nurture our emotional connection with nature, we can also regenerate the ecosystems on which we depend for our survival.

"Renewal: How Nature Awakens Our Creativity, Compassion, and Joy" by Andrés R. Edwards explores the science behind why being in nature makes us feel alive and helps us thrive.

The Adirondack Park is home to the largest protected natural area in the lower 48 states--six million acres including more than 10,000 lakes, 30,000 miles of rivers and streams, and thousands of miles of hiking trails running from mountain summits through a wide variety of habitats including wetlands and old-growth forests.

Carl Heilman has spent the last 40 years hiking and photographing his beloved Adirondack Mountains. He will tell us about his new book: "The Trails of the Adirondacks: Hiking America's Original Wilderness."

Heilman will be giving an illustrated lecture on Wednesday, August 7 at 7 p.m. at the Northshire Bookstore in Saratoga Springs. 

During graduate school, as she conducted experiments on the peculiarly misshapen beaks of chickadees, ornithologist Caroline Van Hemert began to feel stifled in the isolated, sterile environment of the lab. Worried that she was losing her passion for the scientific research she once loved, she was compelled to experience wildness again, to be guided by the sounds of birds and to follow the trails of animals.

In March of 2012 she and her husband set off on a 4,000-mile wilderness journey from the Pacific rainforest to the Alaskan Arctic, traveling by rowboat, ski, foot, raft, and canoe. She tells the story in her new book, "The Sun Is a Compass: A 4,000-Mile Journey Into The Alaskan Wilds."

The Flying Deer Nature Center in New Lebanon, New York is a wilderness school and community dedicated to mentoring children, adults, and families in deep connection to nature, self, and others.

Their educators guide people of all ages in nature immersion and education. Michelle Apland is the Executive Director of Flying Deer Nature Center.

Wildflowers at Bartholomew’s Cobble
trustees.org

The Trustees of Reservations enjoy and care for more than 100 special places – nearly 25,000 acres – all around Massachusetts.

As everything starts blooming, we’re going to learn what’s happening at Trustees sites this spring. 

We are joined by Trustees General Manager for the Southern Berkshires, Brian Cruey and Engagement Site Managers Carrieanne Petrik-Huff and Andrea Caluori.

Image Provided

Established in 1934 by the Lenox Garden Club, The Berkshire Botanical Garden is a not-for-profit, membership-supported educational organization encompassing 15 acres of cultivated land in Stockbridge, Massachusetts.

As un-Spring-like as it feels outside in the region today, we are going to learn about Berkshire Botanical Garden’s spring and summer plans and their The Center House Project expansion.

We are joined by Mike Beck, the Executive Director of The Berkshire Botanical Garden and Matt Larkin, the Chairman of the Board of Trustees. 

  Many childhood summers, Mark Woods piled into a station wagon with his parents and two sisters and headed to America's national parks. Mark’s most vivid childhood memories are set against a backdrop of mountains, woods, and fireflies in places like Redwood, Yosemite, and Grand Canyon national parks.

On the eve of turning fifty and a little burned-out, Mark decided to reconnect with the great outdoors. He'd spend a year visiting the national parks. He planned to take his mother to a park she'd not yet visited and to re-create his childhood trips with his wife and their iPad-generation daughter.

But then the unthinkable happened: his mother was diagnosed with cancer, given just months to live. Mark had initially intended to write a book about the future of the national parks, but Lassoing the Sun grew into something more: a book about family, the parks, the legacies we inherit and the ones we leave behind.