meditation

"Wholly Unraveled" is Keele Burgin’s memoir of self-discovery and finding her voice.

Burgin was raised in a Catholic cult, under the unforgiving eye of her abusive father. She watched her mother disappear before her eyes. Once on her own in the world, Burgin found herself in a damaging spiral of self-destruction. Then, she spent a year in almost complete silence at a remote community in rural Canada. She is now a successful entrepreneur, activist, author, and filmmaker.

Dr. James Gordon is a Harvard-trained psychiatrist, former researcher at the National Institute of Mental Health and, Chair of the White House Commission on Complementary and Alternative Medicine Policy, and a clinical professor of Psychiatry and Family Medicine at Georgetown Medical School.

From the refugee crisis to public shootings, we are bombarded with news daily, events large and small, that cause trauma, both on an interpersonal and an international landscape.

In his latest book, "The Transformation: Discovering Wholeness and Healing After Trauma," renowned expert, Dr. Gordon helps us understand that trauma is a human experience, not a pathological anomaly.

Albany Police Chief Eric Hawkins addresses residents during a recent community forum.
WAMC photo by Dave Lucas

A weekend rally and march protesting recent violence kicked off "Albany Peace Week."

Pam Houston is the author of the memoir, "Deep Creek: Finding Hope In The High Country." In it, she delivers her most profound meditations yet on how "to live simultaneously inside the wonder and the grief to love the damaged world and do what she can to help it thrive."

On her 120-acre homestead high in the Colorado Rockies, Houston learned what it means to care for a piece of land and the creatures on it. Elk calves and bluebirds mark the changing seasons, winter temperatures drop to 35 below, and lightning sparks a 110,000-acre wildfire, threatening her century-old barn and all its inhabitants. Through her travels from the Gulf of Mexico to Alaska, she explores what ties her to the earth, the ranch most of all.

Alongside her devoted Irish wolfhounds and a spirited troupe of horses, donkeys, and Icelandic sheep, the ranch becomes Houston's sanctuary, a place where she discovers how the natural world has mothered and healed her after a childhood of horrific parental abuse and neglect.

Houston will be at Northshire Bookstore in Manchster Center, Vermont on February 24.

Haemin Sunim is one of the most influential Zen Buddhist teachers and writers in the world. Born in South Korea, he came to the United States to study film, only to find himself pulled into the spiritual life. Educated at UC Berkeley, Harvard, and Princeton, he received formal monastic training in Korea and taught Buddhism at Hampshire College in Amherst, Massachusetts.

His books, "The Things You Can See Only When You Slow Down," which has been published in more than thirty languages, and "Love for Imperfect Things," have sold more than four million copies and are popular as guides not only to meditation but also to overcoming the challenges of everyday life. When not traveling to share his teachings, Haemin Sunim lives in Seoul.

Ram Dass and Mirabai Bush began their friendship more than four decades ago at the foot of their guru. He transmitted to them a simple philosophy: love everyone, tell the truth, and give up attachment to material things.

After impacting millions of people through the years with these teachings, they have reunited once more with the new book: "Walking Each Other Home" to enlighten and engage readers on the spiritual opportunities within the dying process.

Mirabai Bush teaches practices and develops programs through the application of contemplative principles and values to organizational life. She is a co-founder of the Center for Contemplative Mind in Society.

The Quarry Pond at Manitoga
Sarah LaDuke

Mid-century designer Russel Wright’s historic home, studio, and woodland grounds, Manitoga, is located in Garrison, NY. This Saturday, Manitoga presents its annual outdoor performance.

Created by Suzanne Thorpe, Resonance & Resemblance is a sonic performance and meditation created for Manitoga and supported in part by grants from the MAP Fund and New Music USA. The event is sold-out.

Suzanne Thorpe composes site-oriented sound works that use a variety of media and technology, and performs on the electroacoustic flute, expanded with digital and analog tools. Thorpe is a former member of indie rock band Mercury Rev and is currently a PhD candidate in Music/Integrative Studies at University of California San Diego, and Co-Director of TECHNE

  Obie-Award winning performance group, The Secret City, will be playing their third annual gathering in Woodstock, NY this Sunday - July 31st at 12 noon. The theme will be PLAY.

The Secret City is the brainchild of impresario and Byrdcliffe Resident, Chris Wells, who moved to Woodstock three years ago and felt the small town with its cultural history, inclusiveness and love of community were a perfect setting for this tribal art gathering.

The Secret City combines art, food, music, storytelling, meditation, singing, performance and community interaction in an event that is part tent revival, part ceremony, part salon.

For their Woodstock gathering they’ll present musical guest Eric Redd, visual art by Jacinta Bunnell, roller derby troupe The Hudson Valley Horrors, food offering by LaGusta of New Paltz, a performance by Percussion Orchestra of Kingston and Energy Dance Company, a reading by Martha Frankel, songs by The Secret City Singers and The Secret City Band and a story by Chris Wells. We welcome Chris and artist Jacinta Bunnell.

  Dr. Joseph Annibali has treated thousands of people with overloaded, over-stimulated brains. Some people describe their brain as being "in chaos"; others feel that their brain is "on fire." But whether they are ultimately diagnosed with "normal" anxiety, disabling OCD, depression, bipolar disorder, or even substance abuse, the underlying problem – according to our next guest - is a Too-Busy-Brain, a great irritant that interferes with attention, concentration, focus, mood, and often much more.

Dr. Annibali says it may even be a sign of undetected damage to either the brain or the body itself. But he believes through practical strategies and prescriptive mind-management techniques it is possible to reclaim their brains and get back in control of their lives. His new book is Reclaim Your Brain.

  Experimental performance artist, composer and musician, Laurie Anderson’s new film, Heart of a Dog, will screen twice as part of FilmColumbia this weekend and will begin a run at Time and Space Limited in Hudson on November 6th.

The film is a meditation on life, perception, and stories. It talks about the loss of a much beloved pet and a less beloved parent. 

 

   Waking Up to the Dark: Ancient Wisdom For a Sleepless Age by Clark Strand is a book for those of us who awaken in the night and don’t know why we can’t get back to sleep, and a book for those of us who have grown uncomfortable in real darkness—which we so rarely experience these days, since our first impulse is always to turn on the light.

In the tradition of Thomas Merton’s spiritual classic The Seven Storey Mountain or Thomas Moore’s Care of the Soul, Waking Up to the Dark is a resonant and personal project and a modern gospel that is an investigation of the relationship between darkness and the soul.

    Drawing from his years of experience as a teacher, spiritual leader, and avid meditator, Edward Viljoen has written The Power of Meditation: An Ancient Technique to Access Your Inner Power.

The book is a guide to the benefits of meditation practices will help readers cultivate a calm, peaceful, and enlightened lifestyle.

Listener Essay - The Retreat

May 23, 2013

   Dan New is a combat Vietnam Veteran and an artist who loves to write and photograph as expression of his life.

A recently released study says that daydreaming may actually be beneficial to high-level brain activity. WAMC’s Melissa Bunning reports.…

Contrary to popular belief, our brains are functioning at higher levels when our minds wander.  Dr. Jonathan Schooler of the University of California, Santa Barbara, explains……

Schooler, and Kalina Christoff of the University of British Columbia, took functional magnetic resonance images, or fMRI scans, of subjects as they were instructed to press a button when numbers appeared on a screen.