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Book cover for "Marriage Story"
Scribd.com

Born and raised in Gloversville, New York, Pulitzer-Prize winning novelist Richard Russo returns to that place in his new Scribd essay, "Marriage Story: An American Memoir." The essay chronicles his parents’ lives and why their marriage foundered.

Ultimately, however, he asks a broader question: Is America going through its own breakup story? Can the divides between rich and poor, black and white, red and blue, educated and not, be overcome or are they irreconcilable differences that will end up pulling the nation apart?

In Susan Conley’s new novel “Landslide,” a mother is caring for her two teenage sons while everything else, her marriage and the fishing industry her New England community relies on. threatens to crumble around her.

Roz Chast has loved to draw cartoons since she was a child growing up in Brooklyn and began selling cartoons to the New Yorker as soon as she submitted them in 1978. Chast's cartoons have also been published in many other magazines.

She has illustrated several books and won many awards for her work. her memoir, "Can We Talk About Something More Pleasant," was a number one New York Times bestseller.

Her latest is "You Can Only Yell At Me for One Thing at a Time: Rules for Couples." It is written with New Yorker contributor Patricia Marx.

Provided - Harper

John Kim is known as “The Angry Therapist.” His new book looks to how to prioritize your relationship with yourself and live a more meaningful life, whether you’re alone, dating, or even with a partner. 

In his own life, John experienced failed relationships and a bitter divorce. In order to end that cycle, he decided to lean into singlehood. In "Single. On Purpose." Kim guides, from being alone and lonely to alone and fulfilled. 

Joe Donahue: Glennon Doyle is the author of the number one New York Times bestseller “Love Warrior” an Oprah's Book Club selection as well as the New York Times bestseller “Carry On, Warrior.” An activist, speaker, and thought leader, she is also the founder and president of Together Rising, an all women-lead nonprofit organization that has revolutionized grassroots philanthropy, raising over $20 million for women, families and children in crisis.

Her latest, “Untamed” is both a memoir and a wakeup call. It offers an examination of the restrictive expectations women are issued from birth, shows how hustling to meet those expectations leaves women feeling dissatisfied and lost, overwhelmed and underwhelmed, and reveals that when we quit abandoning ourselves and instead abandon the world's expectations of us, they become women who can finally look at themselves in the mirror and recognize there she is. 

Long before she was the acclaimed author of "You Just Don't Understand," a groundbreaking book about women and men, Deborah Tannen was a girl who adored her father. Though he was often absent during her childhood, she was profoundly influenced by his gift for writing and storytelling. As she grew up and he grew older, she spent countless hours recording conversations with her father for the account of his life she had promised him she’d write.

But when he hands Tannen journals he kept in his youth, and she discovers letters he saved from a woman he might have married instead of her mother, she is forced to rethink her assumptions about her father’s life and her parents’ marriage.

"Finding My Father" is a memoir of Eli Tannen’s life and the ways in which it reflects the near century that he lived.

Marlo Thomas and Phil Donahue will be in conversation with Joe Donahue tonight at 7 in a virtual event presented by Northshire Bookstore.   

Today marks their 40th wedding anniversary of actress Marlo Thomas and daytime talk trailblazer Phil Donahue - the couple joined us from their home to talk about their new book what makes a marriage last.

It features reflections from celebrity couples including Ron and Cheryl Howard, Kira Sedgwick and Kevin Bacon, Jimmy and Rosalyn Carter, and Jane Wagner and Lily Tomlin just to name a few.

What makes a marriage last? Well, to unlock that mystery Marlo and Phil crisscrossed the country and conducted intimate conversations with 40 celebrated couples whose long marriages they've admired - from award winning actors, athletes, and newsmakers to writers, comedians, musicians, a former US President and First Lady - through these conversations Marlo and Phil also reveal the rich journey of their own marriage.

Political, social and natural landscapes are all in peril. Fascism is on the rise, truth is dead, the planet is heating up. Is it really worth learning to love when the end of the world is nigh? And how do you make art, let alone a life, when one rogue tweet could end it all? These are questions all addressed in Olivia Laing’s new novel, “Crudo.”

Nancy Pearl has worked as a librarian and a bookseller for more than three decades, she is regularly featured on NPR’s Morning Edition talking about her favorite books.

The author of several works on non-fiction, she has now written her first novel, George & Lizzie, an emotional novel about an unlikely marriage as a crossroads.

Author of "Object of My Affection," Stephen McCauley‘s new novel, "My Ex-Life," is about a formerly married couple who haven’t seen each other in decades.

Over the course of the story, we find out what happens when they find themselves living together again.

Aaron Thier’s new novel, "The World is a Narrow Bridge," is a darkly comic road novel about a millennial couple facing the ultimate question: how to live and love in an age of catastrophe.

Here’s the setup:  Young Miami couple Murphy and Eva have almost decided to have a baby when Yahweh, the Old Testament God, appears to Eva and makes an unwelcome demand: He wants her to be his prophet. He also wants her to manage his social media presence.

Equal parts hilarious and poignant, "The World Is a Narrow Bridge" asks: What kind of hope can we pass on to the next generation in a frightening but beautiful world? Thier’s previous novels include "Mr. Eternity" and "The Ghost Apple."

He will be at The Bookstore in Lenox, MA for a joint launch party with Sarah Trudgeon ("The Plot Against the Baby") at 5:30 tonight.

This Saturday, April 28, Linda Lavin and Steve Bakunas will present "Portrait Of An Artist" at 5 p.m. in a benefit performance for the Spencertown Academy Arts Center.

The event features Lavin and Bakunas in a 90-minute intimate evening during which she answers questions about her life and career, posed by her husband, while he paints her portrait on stage. An evening of warmth, romance, humor and nostalgia, the couple has previously performed the program at venues around the country.

James J. Sexton is a trial lawyer with two decades of experience negotiating and litigating high-conflict divorces.

In his new book, "If You're in My Office, It's Already Too Late: A Divorce Lawyer's Guide to Staying Together," he uses his years of experience and observation to reverse engineer relationships and to identify and fix what does not work.

Whether married, single, widowed, divorced, with children or without, at some point women inevitably ask the question, "What's next for me?"

Amy Nobile and Trisha Ashworth create a road map for how to embrace and thrive in this new phase of life in their book, "Just When You’re Comfortable in Your Own Skin, It Starts to Sag: Rewriting the Rules to Midlife."

Daphne de Marneffe, PhD, is a psychologist and the author of "Maternal Desire: On Children, Love, and the Inner Life." In her clinical practice, she offers psychotherapy to couples and individuals. She teaches and lectures widely on marriage, couple therapy, adult development, and parenthood. 

In her new book, "The Rough Patch: Marriage and the Art of Living Together," she explores the pushes and pulls of midlife marriage, where an individual's need to develop can crash headlong into the demands of a relationship.

In Tayari Jones’ new novel, “An American Marriage,” newlyweds Celestial and Roy, African-American professional who live in Atlanta, find their lives shattered when Roy is accused of a crime he didn’t commit and is incarcerated. The novel explores race, loyalty, and love that endures.

"Paris Time" At TheRep

Feb 2, 2018

Capital Reparatory Theatre is currently presenting, "Paris Time," a drama that looks behind the headlines at anti-semitism in today’s France. The world premiere production by Steven Peterson is directed by Gordon Greenberg and runs through February 18.

When Deborah, the wife of a successful American executive based in Paris, becomes an activist defending a young Jewish Frenchwoman, Charles gets caught in the corporate hot seat. Company policy demands him to withdraw from the political limelight or lose his career, but if he won’t get involved, he may lose his marriage.

Jenny Ashman plays Reina in the show and Wally Dunn plays Martin and is making his Capital Rep debut in "Paris Time."

Suzann Pileggi Pawelski, MAPP, is a freelance writer and well-being consultant specializing in the science of happiness and its effects on relationships and health. She has a Master of Applied Positive Psychology degree from the University of Pennsylvania. Her husband, James Pawelski, PH.D. is Professor of Practice and Director of Education in the Positive Psychology Center at the University of Pennsylvania, where he co-founded the Master of Applied Positive Psychology (MAPP) program with Martin Seligman. Together, Suzie and James regularly lead Romance and Research (TM) workshops around the world.

Their new book book is "Happy Together: Using the Science of Positive Psychology to Build Love That Lasts."

In The All-Or-Nothing MarriageHow The Best Marriages Work, renowned relationship expert and Northwestern University professor, Eli Finkel shows that the best marriages today are better than the best marriages of earlier eras. In fact, they are the best marriages the world has ever known.

Finkel reverse engineers the best marriages to better understand the new modern marriage, and shows how any marriage can be better. What does a modern marriage look like? And how can today’s couples seek personal fulfillment in a marriage while remaining committed to it for the long run?

Finkel first introduced this idea in a popular 2014 New York Times op-ed of the same name. Divorce rates may be down from their 1980s peak, but so is general marital happiness, which is what Finkel’s “All-or-Nothing” theory can change in a big way.  

Mark Lukach is a teacher and freelance writer. His work has been published in the New York Times, The Atlantic, Pacific Standard, Wired, and other publications. He is currently the ninth grade dean at The Athenian School, where he also teaches history.

Mark and Giulia’s life together began as a storybook romance. They fell in love at eighteen, married at twenty-four, and were living their dream life in San Francisco. When Giulia was twenty-seven, she suffered a terrifying and unexpected psychotic break that landed her in the psych ward for nearly a month. One day she was vibrant and well-adjusted; the next she was delusional and suicidal, convinced that her loved ones were not safe.

Mark recounts their experience in My Lovely Wife in the Psych Ward: A Memoir.


  The new film, The Lovers, stars Debra Winger as Mary and Tracy Letts as Michael -- a married couple with a son in college who are just about to leave each other after engaging in long-term affairs; she with a writer played by Aidan Gillen (of Game of Thrones) and he with a ballet dancer and instructor played by Melora Walters (memorably from Paul Thomas Anderson’s Magnolia). As their extracurricular partners pressure Mary and Michael to leave the marriage and commit to them, a spark is rekindled and they are reverse cheating with each other. So how does that work out? Well, that’s the movie.

 

The Lovers is screening in theaters all around our region and was written and directed by Azazel Jacobs who joins us now. Jacobs co-wrote and directed the 2011 film, Terri starring John C. Reilly and the HBO series, Doll & Em with Emily Mortimer and Dolly Wells.

Elliot Ackerman is the author of the critically acclaimed novel Green on Blue, is based out of Istanbul, where he has covered the Syrian Civil War since 2013. His writings have appeared in The New Yorker, The Atlantic, The New Republic, and The New York Times Magazine, among other publications, and his stories have been included in The Best American Short Stories. He is both a former White House Fellow and Marine, and served five tours of duty in Iraq and Afghanistan where he received the Silver Star, the Bronze Star for Valor, and the Purple Heart.

In his new novel, Dark at the Crossing, Haris Abadi is a man in search of a cause. An Arab American with a conflicted past, he is now in Turkey, attempting to cross into Syria and join the fight against Bashar al-Assad's regime.

But he is robbed before he can make it, and is taken in by Amir, a charismatic Syrian refugee and former revolutionary, and Amir's wife, Daphne, a sophisticated beauty haunted by grief. As it becomes clear that Daphne is also desperate to return to Syria, Haris's choices become ever more wrenching: Whose side is he really on? Is he a true radical or simply an idealist? 

Best-selling author Ayelet Waldman’s new book, A Really Good Day: How Microdosing Made a Mega Difference in My Mood, My Marriage, and My Life is her firsthand experience taking microdoses of LSD, the effect it had on her, and the ethical problems it presented.  To be clear: Ayelet did not drop a tab of acid; rather, she took a “microdose” (ten milligrams under her tongue) a few times each week for one month. 

What drove her to using LSD? It was perimenopause (and years of accompanying treatments with psychiatrists and psychologists, meditation, to little or no avail). When her mood storms became intolerable, she did what many of us do: she fell down an internet rabbit hole, eventually receiving a vial in her mailbox. Within a month, Ayelet joined the ranks of scientists and civilians successfully using LSD in therapeutic microdoses. 

Imbolo Mbue’s debut novel is Behold the Dreamers. It chronicles a young Cameroonian couple making a new live in New York just as the great recession of the 2000s upends the economy. The novel explores marriage, immigration, class, race, and the trap-doors in the American Dream. 

Ray Kroc was peddling franchises around the country for a fledgling hamburger stand in the 1950s - McDonald’s, it was called - when he entered a St. Paul supper club and encountered a beautiful young piano player named Joan who would change his life forever.

Just as their relationship twisted and turned dramatically, the fortunes of Ray’s new business came perilously close to failure.  Ultimately Ray wrested control of McDonald’s from the original founders; in short order the successful burger stand in the desert of California would be transformed into a stock market sensation and international brand.

To the outside world, Ray and Joan were happy, enormously rich, and giving. But privately, Joan was growing troubled over Ray’s temper and dark secret, something she was reluctant to publicly reveal. And yet, this volatility paved the way for Joan’s transformation into one of the greatest philanthropists of our time.

Journalist Lisa Napoli’s new book is: Ray & Joan: The Man Who Made the McDonald's Fortune and the Woman Who Gave It All Away. 

  Tina Meyer is a poet and freelance writer from Blandford, MA. Her essay is entitled "In the Country of His Hearing Loss. 

  Writer Jay McInerney became famous in the 1980s for Bright Lights, Big City, a semi-autobiographical novel about a young man coming of age in Manhattan, but his latest is more domestic in nature – focusing on the idea of a “perfect marriage.”

Bright, Precious Days is the third book in a trilogy about married couple Russell and Corrine Calloway. 

  Now in his mid-seventies, Russell Banks has indulged his wanderlust for more than half a century.

In Voyager, Russell Banks, a lifelong explorer, shares highlights from his travels: interviewing Fidel Castro in Cuba; motoring to a hippie reunion with college friends in Chapel Hill, North Carolina; eloping to Edinburgh, with his fourth wife, Chase; driving a sunset orange metallic Hummer down Alaska’s Seward Highway.

Russell Banks will be at Northshire Bookstore in Saratoga Springs on Friday, June 24th.

  Lauren Weedman is living what should be the good life in sunny Los Angeles. She has a great career, a loving husband, and an adorable baby boy, but she finds herself starring in a tabloid-worthy nightmare: she’s a Hollywood actress whose husband has an affair with their babysitter. Her new book telling her story is: Miss Fortune: Fresh Perspectives on Having it All from Someone who is NOT Okay.

Weedman is an award-winning comedic actress, playwright and author. Her television credits include The Daily Show, True Blood, Curb Your Enthusiasm, Arrested Development and HBO's Looking. Weedman's first book was A Woman Trapped in a Woman's Body: Tales from a Life of Cringe. She is the host of the popular Moth Storytelling series in LA.

  Elizabeth Brundage is the author of the novels A Stranger Like You, Somebody Else's Daughter, and The Doctor's Wife.

Her latest is All Things Cease to Appear, where late on winter afternoon in upstate, New York, George Clare comes home to find his wife murdered and their three-year-old daughter alone in her room across the hall. The novel is a complex portrait of a psychopath and a marriage.

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