leadership

Deborah L. Rhode is the Ernest W. McFarland Professor of Law, and the director of the Center on the Legal Profession at Stanford University. She was the founding president of the International Association of Legal Ethics, the former president of the Association of American Law Schools, and the former founding director of Stanford's Center on Ethics. She is the nation's most frequently cited scholar on legal ethics and the author of 30 books in the fields of professional responsibility, leadership, and gender.

Her new book is "Character: What It Means and Why It Matters."

Book cover for River of Fire and author photo of Sister Helen Prejean
Author photo by Michael Lionstar

Sister Helen Prejean is considered one of the nation’s foremost leaders in efforts to abolish the death penalty.

In her new book, "River of Fire," she shares the story of her growth as a spiritual leader, speaks out about the challenges of the Catholic Church, and shows that joy and religion are not mutually exclusive.

Today’s leaders are grappling with the pace and complexity of change, the challenge of supporting healthy collaboration and alignment among teams, and the resulting stress and burnout. The practice of mindful leadership may be one of the most important competencies in business today if leaders are to move beyond fear, anxiety, nagging self-doubt, and the feeling of constant overwhelm.

Marc Lesser has taught his proven seven-step method to leaders at Google, Genentech, SAP, Facebook, and dozens of other Fortune 500 companies for over twenty years and has distilled a lifetime of mindfulness and business experience into the book, "Seven Practices of a Mindful Leader: Lessons from Google and a Zen Monastery Kitchen."

Author, historian and Pulitzer Prize-winner Doris Kearns Goodwin has a new book out today and will be in our region later this month for a pair of events to discuss her latest work, "Leadership: In Turbulent Times."

The book chronicles the journeys of four of our nation’s presidents: Abraham Lincoln, Theodore Roosevelt, Franklin D. Roosevelt and Lyndon B. Johnson. Through those histories, Goodwin explores questions of natural leadership ability versus developed ability; the relationship between ambition and adversity on leader ship growth; and how leaders both perceive themselves and are perceived by others.

In February 2013, the arch-conservative Pope Benedict XVI made a startling announcement: he would resign, making him the first pope to willingly vacate his office in over 700 years. Reeling from the news, the College of Cardinals rushed to Rome to congregate in the Sistine Chapel to pick his successor. Their unlikely choice? Francis, the first non-European pope in 1,200 years, a one time tango club bouncer, a passionate soccer fan, a man with the common touch.

Why did Benedict walk away at the height of power, knowing his successor might be someone whose views might undo his legacy? Having immersed himself in these men's lives to write the screenplay for the upcoming motion picture The Pope, Anthony McCarten weaves their stories into one gripping narrative. The Pope is soon to be a major motion picture starring Anthony Hopkins and Jonathan Pryce.

Anthony McCarten is a novelist, playwright, television writer, and filmmaker. He is two time Academy-Award nominated screenwriter for writing the biographical films - "The Theory of Everything" and "The Darkest Hour." He most recently wrote the film "Bohemian Rhapsody" – which has been nominated for an Oscar this year for Best Picture.

Stewart Burns’ newly revised book, "To the Mountaintop" is the history of a turbulent time that changed the course of American and world history. Moral warrior and nonviolent apostle; man of God rocked by fury, fear, and guilt; rational thinker driven by emotional and spiritual truth; Martin Luther King Jr. struggled to reconcile these divisions in his soul. Burns provides a narrative of his intellectual and spiritual journey from cautious liberal, to reluctant radical, to righteous revolutionary. He draws not only on King's speeches, letters, writings, and well-reported strategizing and activities, but also on previously underutilized oral histories of key meetings and events, which present a dramatic account of King and the movement in the crucial years from 1955 to 1968.

Burns is the former editor of the Martin Luther King Jr. Papers at Stanford University, he produced the Montgomery bus boycott volume, "Birth of a New Age." He published the first history of the bus boycott, "Daybreak of Freedom," which was later made into the HBO feature film "Boycott" and he has taught at the University of California, Stanford, Antioch University, and Williams College.

Author, historian and Pulitzer Prize-winner Doris Kearns Goodwin’s latest work is “Leadership: In Turbulent Times.” Goodwin explores questions of natural leadership ability versus developed ability; the relationship between ambition and adversity on leadership growth; and how leaders both perceive themselves and are perceived by others.

Donna Hicks is an associate at the Weatherhead Center for International Affairs, Harvard University. As a conflict resolution specialist, she has facilitated diplomatic efforts in the Middle East and other high-conflict regions and conducted numerous training seminars worldwide. She is the author of the award-winning book, "Dignity: Its Essential Role in Resolving Conflict."

Her new book is "Leading with Dignity: How to Create a Culture That Brings Out the Best in People."

Congressman Paul Tonko
Congressman Paul Tonko

Is it time for new leadership in the Democratic party?

In today’s Congressional Corner, New York Congressman Paul Tonko, a Democrat from the 20th district, continues his discussion with WAMC’s Alan Chartock.

Celebrated Harvard Business School historian Nancy Koehn's newest book Forged in Crisis, spotlights five masters of crisis: polar explorer Ernest Shackleton; President Abraham Lincoln; legendary abolitionist Frederick Douglass; Nazi-resisting clergyman Dietrich Bonhoeffer and environmental crusader Rachel Carson.

What do such disparate figures have in common? Why do their extraordinary stories continue to amaze and inspire? In delivering the answers to those questions, Nancy Koehn offers a template by which to judge those in our own time to whom the public has given its trust.

 Our Falling Into Place series spotlights the important work of -and fosters collaboration between- not-for-profit organizations in our communities; allowing us all to fall into place.

Falling Into Place is supported by The Seymour Fox Memorial Foundation, Providing a helping hand to turn inspiration into accomplishment. See more possibilities … see more promise… see more progress.

Nechama Laber is the Founder and Global Director of Jewish Girls Unite & Jewish Girls Retreat and she joins us today to tell us about her organizations’ mission to provide a safe and loving environment where Jewish girls of all backgrounds explore Judaism through the arts and nature.

  After seven years of service as the president of Tulane University, Scott Cowen watched the devastation of his beloved New Orleans at the hands of Hurricane Katrina.

When federal, state, and city officials couldn't find their way to decisive action, Cowen, known for his gutsy leadership, quickly partnered with a coalition of civic, business, and nonprofit leaders looking to work around the old institutions to revitalize and transform New Orleans.

  On June 23, 2008, President George W. Bush nominated Ann Dunwoody as a four-star general in the US Army—the first time a woman had ever achieved that rank. The news generated excitement around the world.

Now retired after nearly four decades in the Army, General Ann Dunwoody shares what she learned along the way in her book, A Higher Standard: Leadership Strategies from America's First Female Four-Star General.

  For more than fifty years, The Second City comedy theater in Chicago has been a training ground for some of the best comic minds in the industry—including John Belushi, Bill Murray, Gilda Radner, Mike Myers, Steve Carell, Stephen Colbert, and Tina Fey.

But it also provides one-of-a-kind leadership training to cutting-edge companies, nonprofits, and public sector organizations—all aimed at increasing creativity, collaboration, and teamwork.

Yes, And: How Improvisation Reverses "No, But" Thinking and Improves Creativity and Collaboration--Lessons from The Second City is a new book by Kelly Leonard and Tom Yorton.

  After years of research as a psychologist and consultant for women struggling in the professional world, Dr. Stacey Radin made a groundbreaking realization: it all begins in middle school. Women who become successful leaders learn how to do so in the middle grades—the most formative stage in a girl’s development and self-identification.

Unleashed is a social justice program that empowers adolescent girls to recognize their power, learn to embrace it, and use it effectively by taking a stand against an injustice they are passionate about, and advocating for animal rights and welfare in the process.

We speak with Dr. Radin about Unleashed and her book, Brave Girls: Raising Young Women With Passion And Purpose To Become Powerful Leaders.

 We welcome Rich Honen - with Phillips Lytle LLP, where he is the partner in charge of the Albany office.

In The Network: Portrait Conversations, artist Lincoln Schatz offers a unique portrayal of contemporary American leadership and innovation. Representing government, business, science, technology, and culture, Schatz’ eighty-nine subjects include father of the Internet Vint Cerf, Supreme Court Justice Sandra Day O’Connor, Emmy Award-winning journalist Cokie Roberts, Republican strategist Karl Rove, and liberal heavyweight Vernon Jordan.