The Roundtable | WAMC

The Roundtable

Weekdays, 9:00 a.m. - 12:00 p.m.

Credit Peter Steiner

 WAMC's The Roundtable is an award-winning, nationally recognized eclectic talk program. The show airs from 9 a.m. to noon each weekday and features news, interviews, in-depth discussion, music, and much (much) more! Hosted by Joe Donahue and produced by Sarah LaDuke, The Roundtable tackles serious and lighthearted subjects, looking to explore the many facets of the human condition with civility, respect and responsibility.

The show's hallmark is thoughtful interviews with A-list newsmakers, authors, artists, sports figures, actors, and people with interesting stories to tell. Since hitting the airwaves in May of 2001, The Roundtable has interviewed the likes of Arthur Miller, Kurt Vonnegut, Maya Angelou, Madeleine Albright, Jimmy Carter, John McCain, Bob Dole, Steve Martin, James Taylor, Stephen King, Melissa Etheridge, Lin-Manuel Miranda and lots of other really cool people. Plus, Wilco does our theme song. What more can you ask for?

If you would like to be on the show email us at roundtable@wamc.org. Send your comments or questions for The Roundtable Panel to panel@wamc.org

The Roundtable is also available as a podcast.  Subscribe today!

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10:50 - Congressional Corner
11:10 - Earth Wise

11:50 - The Slowdown

Book Picks lists are here.

Music played on the show can be found here.

You may also hear Pulse of the Planet and Sound Beat on The Roundtable.

While you may not immediately recognize the name François Clemmons, you certainly may know him from his groundbreaking role as Officer Clemmons, a recurring character on "Mr. Rogers Neighborhood" with Fred Rogers.

Clemmons overcame a difficult childhood of discrimination to become a musician, a noted choir director, and to serve as a positive image of a black American at a time when racial tensions in the United States were very high.

As he writes in his new memoir, he found a family in Fred Rogers, a friend and mentor. He writes about his life and his deep friendship with Rogers in his new memoir "Officer Clemmons."

How secure is Social Security?

In today’s Congressional Corner, Massachusetts Congressman Richard Neal wraps u[ his conversation with WAMC’s Alan Chartock.

This interview was recorded July 1st.

7/10/20 Panel

Jul 10, 2020

      The Roundtable Panel: a daily open discussion of issues in the news and beyond.

Today's panelists are UAlbany adjunct professor and investigative journalist Rosemary Armao, Visiting Professor at Bennington College, President of Beyond Plastics, and former EPA regional administrator Judith Enck, and Siena College Economics Professor Aaron Pacitti.

In the long history of American demagogues, from Huey Long to Donald Trump, never has one man caused so much damage in such a short time as Senator Joseph McCarthy.

We still use “McCarthyism” to stand for outrageous charges of guilt by association, a weapon of polarizing slander. From 1950 to 1954, McCarthy destroyed many careers and even entire lives, whipping the nation into a frenzy of paranoia, accusation, loyalty oaths, and terror. When the public finally turned on him, he came crashing down, dying of alcoholism in 1957.

Larry Tye’s new biography, "Demagogue," is a portrait of a human being capable of immense evil, yet beguiling charm. McCarthy was a tireless worker and a genuine war hero. When he made it to the Senate, he flailed around in search of an agenda. Finally, after three years, he hit upon anti-communism.

When Donald Trump was elected president in 2016, President Obama observed that Trump “is not an outlier; he is a culmination, a logical conclusion of the rhetoric and tactics of the Republican Party for the past ten, fifteen, twenty years.”

In his new book "Burning Down The House: Newt Gingrich, the Fall of a Speaker, and the Rise of the New Republican Party," author Julian Zelizer, esteemed Princeton historian and CNN Political Analyst, pinpoints the moment when our country was set on a path towards the current era of bitterly partisan and ruthless politics.

Zelizer argues that Newt Gingrich’s political strategies in the 1980s, when he waged a campaign against Speaker of the House Jim Wright, have inspired some of the most divisive episodes in contemporary American politics, from the Tea Party movement to the Trump presidency.

House Democrats are making their case to voters with a raft of legislation.

In today’s Congressional Corner, Massachusetts Congressman Richard Neal speaks with WAMC’s Alan Chartock.

This conversation was recorded July 1st.

7/9/20 Panel

Jul 9, 2020

  The Roundtable Panel: a daily open discussion of issues in the news and beyond.

Today's panelists are WAMC’s Alan Chartock, UAlbany adjunct professor and investigative journalist Rosemary Armao, Peabody and Emmy Award-winning journalist Linda Ellerbee, and counter-terrorism expert and best-selling author, Malcolm Nance.

Swimming is much more than an Olympic event. According to 2017 data 27 million Americans swim for fitness. Similar data is reported from English cities where more than 4 million men and women's swim at least once a month. USA Swimming, the national governing body for the sport in the United States, has 400,000 members and 2800 teams in the country.

Howard Means has just authored the new book "Splash: 10,000 Years of Swimming."

Will President Trump’s taxes be released before his re-election bid in November?

In today’s Congressional Corner, Massachusetts Congressman Richard Neal continues his conversation with WAMC’s Alan Chartock.

This interview was recorded July 1st.

7/8/20 Panel

Jul 8, 2020

    The Roundtable Panel: a daily open discussion of issues in the news and beyond.

Today's panelists are WAMC’s Alan Chartock, Times Union Columnist Chris Churchill, Communications Faculty member at SUNY New Paltz & R.P.I. and former NYS Senator Terry Gipson, and Vice President for Editorial Development at the New York Press Association Judy Patrick.

In President Trump's campaign against what he calls "Fake News," CNN Chief White House Correspondent, Jim Acosta, is public enemy number one. From the moment Mr. Trump announced his candidacy in 2015, he has attacked the media, calling journalists "the enemy of the people."

In his book, just out in paperback, "The Enemy of the People: A Dangerous Time to Tell the Truth in America," Acosta presents a damning examination of bureaucratic dysfunction, deception, and the unprecedented threat the rhetoric Mr. Trump is directing has on our democracy.  At Mr. Trump's most hated network, CNN, Acosta offers a never-before-reported account of what it's like to be the President's most hated correspondent. Acosta goes head-to-head with the White House, even after Trump supporters have threatened his life with words as well as physical violence. Acosta will be taking part in an online conversation with Berkshire Eagle Executive Editor Kevin Moran for the Osher Lifelong Learning Institute (OLLI) at Berkshire Community Collegeon Thursday, July 9th at 7pm via Zoom. The program is titled: The Enemy of the People: One Year, One Impeachment and One Pandemic Later.

    This week's Book Picks come from Connie Brooks of Battenkill Books in Cambridge, NY.

List:
"The Party Upstairs" by Lee Conell
"Survivor Song" by Paul Tremblay
"Rotherweird" by Andrew Caldecott
"The Cold Vanish: Seeking the Missing in North America’s Wildlands" by Jon Billman
"Weird: The Power of Being an Outsider in an Insider World" by Olga Khazan
"The Mermaid, the Witch and the Sea" by Maggie Tokuda-Hall
"A Peculiar Peril" by Jeff VanderMeer

Congressman Paul Tonko
Congressman Paul Tonko

No matter where you live, cuts are probably coming.

In today’s Congressional Corner, New York Congressman Paul Tonko, a Democrat from the 20th district, wraps up his conversation with WAMC’s Alan Chartock.

7/7/20 Panel

Jul 7, 2020

  The Roundtable Panel: a daily open discussion of issues in the news and beyond.

Today's panelists are WAMC’s Alan Chartock, investigative journalist and UAlbany adjunct professor Rosemary Armao, The Empire Report’s J.P. Miller, and former Associate Editor of The Times Union Mike Spain.

Our Falling into Place series spotlights the important work of -and fosters collaboration between- not-for-profit organizations in our communities; allowing us all to fall into place.

Falling Into Place is supported by The Seymour Fox Memorial Foundation, Providing a helping hand to turn inspiration into accomplishment. See more possibilities … see more promise… see more progress.

This morning we learn about The Salvation Army's current efforts throughout the Capital Region. We welcome Envoy Vangerl Pegues, co-Commander of the Troy Corps; Major Leo Lloyd, co-Commander of the Glens Falls Corps; Lieutenant Bree Barker, co-Commander of the Saratoga Corps.

Congressman Paul Tonko
Congressman Paul Tonko

America has not limited the spread of COVID-19.

In today’s Congressional Corner, New York Congressman Paul Tonko, a Democrat from the 20th district, continues his conversation with WAMC’s Alan Chartock.

7/6/20 Panel

Jul 6, 2020

          The Roundtable Panel: a daily open discussion of issues in the news and beyond.

Today's panelists are WAMC’s Alan Chartock, UAlbany Lecturer in Africana Studies Jennifer Burns, Albany Law School professor and director of the Immigration Law Clinic Sarah Rogerson, and Professor of Web and Cognitive Sciences at RPI and Director of the RPI-IBM Artificial Intelligence research collaboration Jim Hendler.

On Friday, July 3, Tanglewood will present violinist Gil Shaham performing a new program for unaccompanied violin for the "Great Performers in Recital from Tanglewood" Series. Shaham will play works by three living American composers (including two works written for him) and works by Bach and Prokofiev.

Gil Shaham made his Tanglewood debut 27 years ago. He is is one of the foremost violinists of our time and is sought after throughout the world for concerto appearances with leading orchestras and conductors, and regularly gives recitals and appears with ensembles on the world’s great concert stages and at the most prestigious festivals.

Jamie Bernstein
Steve J. Sherman / Star Tribune

Jamie Bernstein is an author, narrator, and filmmaker. Her memoir, "Famous Father Girl," details her youth growing up with her father, composer-conductor Leonard Bernstein, and her mother, pianist and actress Felicia Montealegre.

This summer, Jamie Bernstein will introduce online airings of special Boston Symphony Orchestra Encore Performances from Tanglewood. The concerts will feature the BSO and Tanglewood Festival Chorus and will be available online on Sundays at 2:30 p.m. July 5 through August 23.

Carl Reiner, the ingenious and versatile writer, actor and director who broke through as a “second banana” to Sid Caesar and rose to comedy’s front ranks as creator of “The Dick Van Dyke Show” and straight man to Mel Brooks’ “2000 Year Old Man,” died on Monday. He was 98. Carl Reiner was one of show business’ best-liked men. His was a welcome face on the small and silver screens: In Caesar’s 1950s troupe; as the self-absorbed Alan Brady of “The Dick Van Dyke Show”; and in such films as “The Russians Are Coming, the Russians Are Coming” and “It’s a Mad, Mad, Mad, Mad World.”

Congressman Paul Tonko
Congressman Paul Tonko

The U.S.-Russia relationship has taken another turn.

In today’s Congressional Corner, New York Congressman Paul Tonko, a Democrat from the 20th district, speaks with WAMC’s Alan Chartock.

7/2/20 Panel

Jul 2, 2020

        The Roundtable Panel: a daily open discussion of issues in the news and beyond.

Today's panelists are WAMC’s Alan Chartock, investigative journalist and UAlbany adjunct professor Rosemary Armao, Siena College Professor of Comparative Politics Vera Eccarius-Kelly, and Berkshire Eagle reporter Jenn Smith.

Emanuel Ax
Lisa Marie Mazzucco / https://emanuelax.com/

Pianist and Tanglewood mainstay Emanuel Ax made his Boston Symphony Orchestra debut at Tanglewood in 1978. In this modified online season, Ax will perform a Great Performers Recital online on Saturday, July 11 at 8 p.m. The event will be hosted by Nicole Cabell.

Ax will perform music in which he is an acknowledged master - an all-Beethoven program featuring two of the composer’s earlier sonatas. He will also perform in August with friend and collaborator, cellist Yo-Yo Ma. 

Sarah LaDuke

It sounds impossible to believe, but hundreds of thousands of music lovers will not be taking in concerts from the rolling green grass at Tanglewood this summer because of the ongoing coronavirus pandemic. But, the Boston Symphony Orchestra is taking its acclaimed, months-long music festival into the digital realm.

BSO musicians — along with a wide range of guest artists including cellist Yo-Yo Ma, pianist Emanuel Ax and violinist Joshua Bell — are helping to produce original, pre-recorded performances for the new Tanglewood 2020 Online Festival.

Encore and archival performances are also part of the lineup, in addition to informal conversations with artists and master classes.

According to BSO president and CEO Mark Volpe, more than eight million people have engaged virtually with the organization's output over the past two months and they hope for much more this summer.

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