The Roundtable | WAMC

The Roundtable

Weekdays, 9:00 a.m. - 12:00 p.m.

Credit Peter Steiner

 WAMC's The Roundtable is an award-winning, nationally recognized eclectic talk program. The show airs from 9 a.m. to noon each weekday and features news, interviews, in-depth discussion, music, and much (much) more! Hosted by Joe Donahue and produced by Sarah LaDuke, The Roundtable tackles serious and lighthearted subjects, looking to explore the many facets of the human condition with civility, respect and responsibility.

The show's hallmark is thoughtful interviews with A-list newsmakers, authors, artists, sports figures, actors, and people with interesting stories to tell. Since hitting the airwaves in May of 2001, The Roundtable has interviewed the likes of Arthur Miller, Kurt Vonnegut, Maya Angelou, Madeleine Albright, Jimmy Carter, John McCain, Bob Dole, Steve Martin, James Taylor, Stephen King, Melissa Etheridge, Lin-Manuel Miranda and lots of other really cool people. Plus, Wilco does our theme song. What more can you ask for?

If you would like to be on the show email us at roundtable@wamc.org. Send your comments or questions for The Roundtable Panel to panel@wamc.org

The Roundtable is also available as a podcast.  Subscribe today!

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10:50 - Congressional Corner
11:10 - Earth Wise

11:50 - The Slowdown

Book Picks lists are here.

Music played on the show can be found here.

You may also hear Pulse of the Planet and Sound Beat on The Roundtable.

Andrew Whitby is a data scientist who works on innovation, growth and development. He studied economics and computer science at the University of Queensland and received a PhD in econometrics from the University of Oxford, where he was an Oxford-Australia–James Fairfax scholar.

In "The Sum of the People," Whitby traces the remarkable history of the census, from ancient China and the Roman Empire, through revolutionary America and Nazi-occupied Europe, to the steps of the Supreme Court. arent -- may offer the seeds of an alternative.

Albany Mayor Kathy Sheehan
Dave Lucas

WAMC's Ian Pickus interviews Albany Mayor Kathy Sheehan about the coronavirus, social distancing and the pandemic's economic impacts. Sheehan is a second-term Democrat.

Mark Honigsbaum is a medical historian, journalist, and author of five books including "The Pandemic Century: One Hundred Years of Panic, Hysteria, and Hubris."

In the book, Honigsbaum narrates the last century of scientific struggle against the enemy we face today: deadly contagious disease. He would argue that our current crisis is representative of the cycle of neglect that has characterized our responses to epidemics and pandemics over the last 100 years.

Today’s situation contains uncanny parallels with 1918’s Spanish flu pandemic, not least in the virus’s stealthy, silent spread around the world, before erupting suddenly in multiple urban centers at the same time.

4/3/20 Panel

2 hours ago

    The Roundtable Panel: a daily open discussion of issues in the news and beyond.

Today's panelists are WAMC’s Alan Chartock, President and CEO The Business Council of New York State Heather Briccetti, Senior Fellow and Visiting Professor at Bennington College, Founder of Beyond Plastics, former EPA regional administrator Judith Enck, and Siena College Economics Professor, Aaron Pacitti.

Boston Mayor Martin Walsh announced last week that he was bringing on the firm run by retired General Stanley McChrystal to oversee the city's emergency response to the coronavirus pandemic as cases rise in the city.

McChrystal is a retired four-star Army general who is best known for leading the Joint Special Operations Command in the 2000s and commanding the U.S. forces in Afghanistan. For the next two months, the team at the McChrystal Group will focus on the coordination of city agencies, integrating theirour response plans, and ensuring effective and transparent communication of those plans to city residents.

McChrystal’s advice on how to lead the nation through the coronavirus pandemic is instill confidence, tell the truth, be unified and fight it like a war.

Spring break turned into summer vacation.

In today’s Congressional Corner, Vermont Representative Peter Welch continues his conversation with WAMC’s Alan Chartock.

This conversation was recorded on March 24.

4/2/20 Panel

Apr 2, 2020

        The Roundtable Panel: a daily open discussion of issues in the news and beyond.

Today's panelists are WAMC’s Alan Chartock, Siena College Professor of Comparative Politics Vera Eccarius-Kelly, Tetherless World Professor of Computer, Web and Cognitive Sciences at RPI and Director of the RPI-IBM Artificial Intelligence research collaboration Jim Hendler, and Skidmore College President Philip Glotzbach.

More than 5,000 ships left Ireland during the great potato famine in the late 1840s, transporting the starving and the destitute away from their stricken homeland. The first vessel to sail in the other direction, to help the millions unable to escape, was the USS Jamestown, a converted warship, which left Boston in March 1847 loaded with precious food for Ireland.

In an unprecedented move by Congress, the warship had been placed in civilian hands, stripped of its guns, and committed to the peaceful delivery of food, clothing, and supplies in a mission that would launch America’s first full-blown humanitarian relief effort.

In the new book, "Voyage of Mercy: The USS Jamestown, the Irish Famine, and the Remarkable Story of America's First Humanitarian Mission," Stephen Puleo tells the incredible story of the famine, the Jamestown voyage, and the commitment of thousands of ordinary Americans to offer relief to Ireland, a groundswell that provided the collaborative blueprint for future relief efforts, and established the United States as the leader in international aid. The USS Jamestown’s heroic voyage showed how the ramifications of a single decision can be measured not in days, but in decades.

Unity House is a Rensselaer County-based human service agency that provides a wide range of services to meet the otherwise unmet needs of people in the community who are hurting and struggling. They assist those who are living in poverty, adults living with mental illness or HIV/AIDS, victims of domestic violence, and children with developmental delays. They work to achieve social justice in our community and to create a better understanding of those we serve.

COVID-19 has disrupted daily life across the Northeast.

In today’s Congressional Corner, Vermont Representative Peter Welch speaks with WAMC’s Alan Chartock.

This conversation was recorded on March 24.

4/1/20 Panel

Apr 1, 2020

      The Roundtable Panel: a daily open discussion of issues in the news and beyond.

Today's panelists are WAMC’s Alan Chartock, investigative journalist and UAlbany adjunct professor Rosemary Armao, and Dean of the College of Emergency Preparedness, Homeland Cybersecurity at the University at Albany Robert Griffin.

Times Union Columnist Chris Churchill joined us for awhile but had to leave due to technical difficulties.

This week's Book Picks come from Kira Wizner of Merritt Bookstore in Millbrook, NY.

List:
"Valentine" by Elizabeth Wetmore
"The Glass Hotel" by Emily St John Mandel
"Writers and Lovers" by Lily King
"The Mountains Sing" by Que Mai Phan Nguyen
"Untamed" by Glennon Doyle
"The City We Became: A Novel" by N. K. Jemisin

U.S. Representative for New York's 22nd congressional district Anthony Brindisi
Official Portrait 116th Congress

Federal spending is not going to stick to the plan this year.

In today’s Congressional Corner, Anthony Brindisi of New York’s 22nd Congressional district wraps up his conversation with WAMC’s Alan Chartock. This interview was recorded on March 23.

3/31/20 Panel

Mar 31, 2020

    The Roundtable Panel: a daily open discussion of issues in the news and beyond.

Today's panelists are WAMC’s Alan Chartock, investigative journalist and UAlbany adjunct professor Rosemary Armao, The Empire Report’s J.P. Miller, and former Associate Editor of The Times Union, Mike Spain.

David Randall is a senior reporter at Reuters and author of the New York Times bestseller "Black Death at the Golden Gate: The Race to Save America from the Bubonic Plague."

It is the story of how the bubonic plague came to San Francisco in 1900 and how, in the face of inaction and obfuscation from local government, press, railroad barons, etc., one federal health officer and his team saved the city and contained the spread of the disease.

The denial and feet-dragging of those in power when confronted with the plague resonates with our current situation, as does the racism and xenophobia that blossomed with its spread.

Our Falling into Place series spotlights the important work of -and fosters collaboration between- not-for-profit organizations in our communities; allowing us all to fall into place.

Falling Into Place is supported by The Seymour Fox Memorial Foundation, Providing a helping hand to turn inspiration into accomplishment. See more possibilities … see more promise… see more progress.

This morning we focus on the Albany Damien Center and welcome Executive Director Perry Junjulas.

Amitava Kumar's "Every Day I Write the Book" features interviews with an array of writers whose distinct work offers inspiring examples for students and academics alike, the book's pages are full of practical advice about everything from how to write criticism to making use of a kitchen timer.

Amitava Kumar is Helen D. Lockwood Professor of English at Vassar College and the author of numerous books, including "Lunch with a Bigot;" "A Matter of Rats;" "Nobody Does the Right Thing," and "Immigrant, Montana: A Novel."

U.S. Representative for New York's 22nd congressional district Anthony Brindisi
Official Portrait 116th Congress

After the pandemic, election season looms.

In today’s Congressional Corner, Anthony Brindisi of New York’s 22nd Congressional district continues his conversation with WAMC’s Alan Chartock. This interview was recorded on March 23.

3/30/20 Panel

Mar 30, 2020

        The Roundtable Panel: a daily open discussion of issues in the news and beyond.

Today's panelists are WAMC’s Alan Chartock, investigative journalist and UAlbany adjunct professor Rosemary Armao, Bard Center for Civic Engagement Senior Fellow and Dean of the School of Continuing Education at the American University Cairo Jim Ketterer, and political consultant and lobbyist Libby Post.

Miller Park in Milwaukee in 2018.
Ian Pickus

Usually when we call up Keith Strudler, director of the school of communication and media at Montclair State University and WAMC’s sports commentator, it’s to get his thoughts on a major moment in sports. Right now, the biggest story in the world of sports is the utter absence of sports during the coronavirus outbreak.

U.S. Representative for New York's 22nd congressional district Anthony Brindisi
Official Portrait 116th Congress

Today we’re featuring a Congressional Corner first: an interview with a member in quarantine.

In today’s Congressional Corner, Anthony Brindisi of New York’s 22nd Congressional district speaks with WAMC’s Alan Chartock. 

This interview was recorded on March 23.

3/27/20 Panel

Mar 27, 2020

    The Roundtable Panel: a daily open discussion of issues in the news and beyond.

Today's panelists are WAMC’s Alan Chartock, Senior Fellow and Visiting Professor at Bennington College, Founder of Beyond Plastics, former EPA regional administrator Judith Enck, Artistic Director/CEO of Berkshire Theatre Group Kate Maguire, Siena College Economics Professor, Aaron Pacitti.

The emergence of strange new diseases is a frightening problem that seems to be getting worse. In this age of speedy travel, it threatens a worldwide pandemic. Coronavirus is here and before it we heard about Ebola, SARS, AIDS, and something called Hendra killing horses and people in Australia―but those reports miss the big truth that such phenomena are part of a single pattern.

The bugs that transmit these diseases share one thing: they originate in wild animals and pass to humans by a process called spillover. In his new book, "Spillover: Animal Infections and the Next Human Pandemic, Science" journalist David Quammen tracks this subject around the world. He recounts adventures in the field―netting bats in China, trapping monkeys in Bangladesh, stalking gorillas in the Congo―with the world’s leading disease scientists.

wikipedia commons

Even during the pandemic, the political calendar goes forward.

In today’s Congressional Corner, WAMC’s Alan Chartock wraps up his interview with Massachusetts U.S. Senator Ed Markey. This interview was recorded on March 17.

3/26/20 Panel

Mar 26, 2020

      The Roundtable Panel: a daily open discussion of issues in the news and beyond.

Today's panelists are WAMC’s Alan Chartock, investigative journalist and UAlbany adjunct professor Rosemary Armao, Corporate Attorney Rich Honen, Skidmore College President Philip Glotzbach.

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