The Roundtable

Weekdays, 9 a.m.

Credit Peter Steiner

 WAMC's The Roundtable is an award-winning, nationally recognized eclectic talk program. The show airs from 9 a.m. to noon each weekday and features news, interviews, in-depth discussion, music, and much (much) more! Hosted by Joe Donahue and produced by Sarah LaDuke, The Roundtable tackles serious and lighthearted subjects, looking to explore the many facets of the human condition with civility, respect and responsibility.

The show's hallmark is thoughtful interviews with A-list newsmakers, authors, artists, sports figures, actors, and people with interesting stories to tell. Since hitting the airwaves in May of 2001, The Roundtable has interviewed the likes of Arthur Miller, Kurt Vonnegut, Maya Angelou, Madeleine Albright, Jimmy Carter, John McCain, Bob Dole, Steve Martin, James Taylor, Stephen King, Melissa Etheridge, Lin-Manuel Miranda and lots of other really cool people. Plus, Wilco does our theme song. What more can you ask for?

If you would like to be on the show email us at roundtable@wamc.org. Send your comments or questions for The Roundtable Panel to panel@wamc.org

The Roundtable is also available as a podcast.  Subscribe today!

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10:50 - Congressional Corner
11:10 - Earth Wise

11:50 - The Slowdown

Book Picks lists are here.

You may also hear Pulse of the Planet and Sound Beat on The Roundtable.

Jackson Murphy (a.k.a. Lights-Camera-Jackson) began his career as a movie critic at the age of 7 1/2, doing reviews in our region. He has talked movies and made award predictions on "Fox and Friends," "The TodayShow," "The Tonight Show with Jay Leno” and "The Early Show", following which he was signed as a contributing critic on the CBS show.

He currently is the mind behind the entertainment website, Lights-Camera-Jackson. He joins us this morning to talk about the 91st Academy Awards to be handed out Sunday Night in Hollywood.

The 91st Academy Awards happen this Sunday. The ceremony itself has been plagued with controversies for months. But, by the weekend, it will be time to celebrate the past year in film.

This season featured several films that were both critical darlings and box-office hits, like "A Star Is Born" and "Black Panther," both of which are nominated for Best Picture. "Bohemian Rhapsody" was panned by critics and loved by audiences and could win big. There have been record-breaking nominations, really, really close races and great disagreement over who deserves top honors.

Thelma Adams is the author of the bestselling novels: "Bittersweet Brooklyn," "The Last Woman Standing" and "Playdate." Additionally, she is a prominent film critic – having been the in-house film critic for Us Weekly and the New York Post. Her greatest title is that she is an Oscarologist.

President Trump is not very popular beyond his base.

In today’s Congressional Corner, Tim Vercellotti of the Western New England University poll and professor of political science, continues his conversation with WAMC’s Alan Chartock.

File: Governor Andrew Cuomo at Norsk Titanium in Plattsburgh
Pat Bradley/WAMC

New York Gov. Andrew Cuomo speaks with WAMC's Alan Chartock on The Roundtable Feb. 22, 2019.

Kevin Toolis is a writer and BAFTA-winning filmmaker. The author of a celebrated chronicle of Ireland's Troubles, "Rebel Hearts: Journeys within the IRA's Soul," he has written for the New York Times Magazine and The Guardian and reported on conflicts around the world. His family has lived in the same village on an island off the coast of County Mayo for the last two hundred years.

In his new book, "My Father's Wake," he describes his own father's wake and explores the wider history and significance of this ancient and eternal Irish ritual.

1/22/19 Panel

8 hours ago

  The Roundtable Panel: a daily open discussion of issues in the news and beyond.

Today's panelists are WAMC’s Alan Chartock, Albany County District Attorney David Soares, Senior Fellow and Visiting Professor at Bennington College, Founder of Beyond Plastics, and former EPA regional administrator Judith Enck, and Siena College economic professor Aaron Pacitti.

The last section of the show features a live conversation between Alan Chartock and New York Governor Andrew Cuomo.

Esmeralda Santiago, a founding mother of Nuyorican literature, was part of the University at Albany’s: The Creative Life: Conversation Series in the Fall of last year.

The eldest in a family of 11 children, Santiago came to the States from Puerto Rico at the age of 13. After eight years of part-time study in community colleges, she transferred to Harvard where she graduated magna cum laude. Santiago’s bestselling 1993 memoir, "When I Was Puerto Rican," was named one of the “Best Memoirs of a Generation” by Oprah’s Book Club. Her second memoir, "Almost a Woman" was adapted for Masterpiece Theatre on PBS. Her epic 2011 novel, "Conquistadora," set in 19th century Puerto Rico, was hailed as a “triumph” in The Washington Post.

The Creative Life series is a major arts initiative of the New York State Writers Institute, UAlbany Performing Arts Center and University Art Museum in conjunction with WAMC produced with major support from the University at Albany Foundation.

This conversation was recorded on November 8th, 2018 at the University at Albany Campus Center Ballroom.

Veera Hiranandani earned her MFA in creative writing at Sarah Lawrence College. She is the author of "The Whole Story of Half a Girl," which was named a Sydney Taylor Notable Book and a South Asian Book Award Finalist. A former book editor at Simon & Schuster, she now teaches creative writing at Sarah Lawrence College's Writing Institute and Writopia Lab.

In her new book "The Night Diary," it's 1947, and India, newly independent of British rule, has been separated into two countries: Pakistan and India. The divide has created much tension between Hindus and Muslims, and hundreds of thousands are killed crossing borders.

Half-Muslim, half-Hindu twelve-year-old Nisha doesn't know where she belongs, or what her country is anymore. When Papa decides it's too dangerous to stay in what is now Pakistan, Nisha and her family become refugees and embark first by train but later on foot to reach her new home.

Modern technology can make life tough for pollsters.

In today’s Congressional Corner, Tim Vercellotti of the Western New England University poll and professor of political science, speaks with WAMC’s Alan Chartock.

Shawn Stone joins us to talk about what he's seen lately and what cultural events are coming up this week in our region.

Seen: "They Shall Not Grow Old"

Upcoming:

  • Cartoon Madness: The Many Faces of Fudd - Capitol Theatre, Rome, Thursday-Friday 2/21-22 at 3 PM; Saturday 2/23 at 3 and 7 PM
  • Postmodern Jukebox - Troy Savings Bank Music Hall, Troy, Friday 2/22, 8 PM
  • Dane Cook: Tell It Like It Is - Palace Theatre, Albany, Friday, 2/22, 7:30 PM
  • Jontavious Willis - Caffe Lena, Saratoga Springs, Friday 2/22, 8 PM
  • Eddie Griffin - Funny Bone Comedy Club, Guilderland, Friday-Saturday 2/22-23, various times
  • Kaki King: Data Not Found - MASS MoCA, North Adams, Mass., Saturday 2/23, 8 PM
  • "The Big Sleep" - Palace Theatre, Albany, Monday 2/25, 7 PM
  • Roald Dahl’s "Charlie and the Chocolate Factory" - Proctors, Mainstage, Schenectady, opens Tuesday 2/26 at 7:30 PM, through March 3
  • Rachael & Vilray - Helsinki Hudson, Hudson, Wednesday 2/27, 8 PM

New movies: "Arctic," "Never Look Away," "How To Train Your Dragon: The Hidden World," "Fighting With My Family"

2/21/19 Panel

Feb 21, 2019

The Roundtable Panel: a daily open discussion of issues in the news and beyond.

Today's panelists are WAMC’s Alan Chartock, VP of Editorial Development for the New York Press Association Judy Patrick, Dean of the College of Emergency Preparedness, Homeland Security and Cybersecurity at the University at Albany Robert Griffin, and communications consultant Joe Bonilla.

Thumbnail images of artwork by Jean Shin
http://www.jeanshin.com/

Jean Shin, sculptor and public installation artist, was part of the University at Albany’s: The Creative Life: Conversation Series in the Fall of last year.

Shin is nationally recognized for her monumental installations that transform everyday objects into expressions of identity and community. For each project, she amasses vast collections of a particular object (prescription pill bottles, sports trophies, sweaters) which are often sourced through donations from individuals in a participating community. These intimate objects then become the materials for sculptures, videos and site-specific installations. Her work has been widely exhibited in over 150 major museums and cultural institutions.

The Creative Life series is a major arts initiative of the New York State Writers Institute, UAlbany Performing Arts Center and University Art Museum in conjunction with WAMC produced with major support from the University at Albany Foundation.

This conversation was recorded on November 1, 2018 at the University at Albany Performing Arts Center.

Former White House social secretaries Lea Berman, who worked for George and Laura Bush, and Jeremy Bernard, who worked for Michelle and Barack Obama, have collaborated on the book "Treating People Well: The Extraordinary Power of Civility at Work and in Life."

Their daily experiences at 1600 Pennsylvania Avenue taught them valuable lessons about how to work productively with people from different walks of life and points of view. These Washington insiders share what they’ve learned through first person examples of their own glamorous (and sometimes harrowing) moments with celebrities, foreign leaders and that most unpredictable of animals - the American politician.

Western Massachusetts has new clout in the House.

In today’s Congressional Corner, Massachusetts Congressman Jim McGovern, a Democrat from the second district, wraps up his discussion with WAMC’s Alan Chartock.

Psychologist Thomas Harbin specializes in the treatment of male rage. In his book, "Beyond Anger" Harbin explains specific symptoms of chronic anger and the negative effects on family, friends and coworkers.

Harbin helps men overcome violent feelings with exercises that create new habits, preventing anger before it starts. In the book women also learn skills for dealing with the angry men in their lives.    

2/20/19 Panel

Feb 20, 2019

 

The Roundtable Panel: a daily open discussion of issues in the news and beyond.

Today's panelists are WAMC’s Alan Chartock, Berkshire Eagle Reporter Jenn Smith, SUNY New Paltz Communications Professor, Terry Gipson, and Tetherless World Professor of Computer, Web and Cognitive Sciences at RPI Jim Hendler.

Listener Essay - Pumping Gas

Feb 19, 2019
Bama - a yellow lab
Bob Slack

 

  Debbie Slack was honored to be a recipient of the 2018 Edwin Way Teale Artist in Residence at Trail Wood sponsored by the Connecticut Audubon Society.

Inspired by the residency, Debbie has been writing a series of essays which has expanded into a memoir titled "Trail Wood: A Love Story." Debbie is also focused on publishing her novel, "Margaret Mary and the Gutsy Girls." She is excited for their story to leave the comforts of home and venture out into the hearts of girls everywhere. Outside of writing, Debbie enjoys exploring nature with her husband, Bob, and their two Labradors.

~Pumping Gas~

It was just a typical day and I assumed an ordinary moment, when I drove into the gas station with my son’s Yellow Labrador Retriever watching me from the backseat. While my son’s deployed we’ve been taking care of Bama, a gentle giant, who croons like a hound dog and acts all innocent when the bread goes missing even though his snoot is peppered in crumbs. When Bama’s allergies flare-up, he scratches, loses hair, and turns pink. So this morning when he was looking less a dog and more like a pig, I called the vet’s office. They insisted I bring him right in. It’s a thirty-minute drive one-way and by the time we arrived, the office was overwhelmed with an emergency and needed to reschedule. I understood, but the trip was about to waste an hour of my time and all of my gas.

Bibbe Hansen, pop cultural icon, performance artist, musician, and actress known for her work with Andy Warhol was part of the University at Albany’s: The Creative Life: Conversation Series with me in the Fall of last year.

Born to the bohemian poet Audrey Ostin Hansen and Fluxus artist Al Hansen in 1952, she was introduced to Andy Warhol in 1964 when her father took her to the popular bohemian artist hangout, Stark’s coffee shop, in New York City.

She became the youngest of the Warhol Superstars at just 12-years old starring in his films Prison and Restaurant. She also sat for two Screen Tests for Warhol the following year.

The Creative Life series is a major arts initiative of the New York State Writers Institute, UAlbany Performing Arts Center and University Art Museum in conjunction with WAMC produced with major support from the University at Albany Foundation.

This conversation was recorded on September 5, 2018 at the University Art Museum on UAlbany’s Uptown campus. This semester’s Creative Life events will feature author Susan Orlean on March 1 and comedian and actor Paul Reiser on April 4.

  This week's Book Picks come from Suzanna Hermans of Oblong Books and Music in Millerton and Rhinebeck, New York. List:

New House, new rules.

In today’s Congressional Corner, Massachusetts Congressman Jim McGovern, a Democrat from the second district, continues his discussion with WAMC’s Alan Chartock.

Our “Falling into Place” series spotlights the important work of -and fosters collaboration between- not-for-profit organizations in our communities; allowing us all to fall into place. “Falling Into Place” is supported by The Seymour Fox Memorial Foundation, Providing a helping hand to turn inspiration into accomplishment. See more possibilities … see more promise… see more progress.

This week we are learning about the Boys & Girls Club of the Capital Area – the Albany and Troy Clubs have just merged. To tell us all about it we welcome: Boys & Girls Clubs of the Capital Area’s Chief Executive Officer Justin Reuter and Chief Operations Officer Patrick Doyle.

2/19/19 Panel

Feb 19, 2019

 

The Roundtable Panel: a daily open discussion of issues in the news and beyond.

Today's panelists are WAMC’s Alan Chartock, recently retired Associate Editor of the Times Union Mike Spain, The Empire Report’s J.P. Miller, lobbyist and political consultant Libby Post, and the Edward Hamilton Distinguished Professor of Computer Science at RPI and a Faculty Associate at the Berkman Klein Center for Internet and Society, at Harvard University Fran Berman.

The Berkshires’ Jewish Festival of Books -- held at Hevreh of Southern Berkshire -- and The Berkshire Jewish Film Festival of Knesset Israel are collaborating on an Egg Cream Eggstravaganza on Saturday, February 16 at 7 p.m. at Hevreh of Southern Berkshire in Great Barrington, Massachusetts.

The evening will begin with a screening of the short film “Egg Cream” by Nora Claire Miller, Peter Miller and Amy Linton. Following the film, author Barry Joseph will give the audience a taste via video of his book “Seltzertopia: The Extraordinary Story of an Ordinary Drink.” Then, audience members will be invited to share their own egg cream reminiscences and enjoy real siphon bottle seltzer, milk, and Fox’s U-Bet egg creams.

We were joined by Berkshire Jewish Film Festival Executive Director, Judy Seaman; Co-Chair of the Berkshires’ Jewish Festival of Books Avi Dresner; and “Egg Cream” co-director Peter Miller.

In late summer 1940, as war spread across Europe and as the nation pulled itself out of the Great Depression, an anti-communist hysteria convulsed New York City. Targeting the city’s municipal colleges and public schools, the New York state legislature’s Rapp-Coudert investigation dragged hundreds of suspects before public and private tribunals to root out a perceived communist conspiracy to hijack the city’s teachers unions, subvert public education, and indoctrinate the nation’s youth.

Drawing on the vast archive of Rapp-Coudert records, Union College History Professor Andrew Feffer looks to provide the first full history of this witch-hunt, which lasted from August 1940 to March 1942.

He does so in the new book: "Bad Faith: Teachers, Liberalism, and the Origins of McCarthyism." Andrew Feffer is Professor of History and Co-Director of the Interdisciplinary Program in Film Studies at Union College.

2/15/19 Panel

Feb 15, 2019

 

The Roundtable Panel: a daily open discussion of issues in the news and beyond.

Today's panelists are WAMC’s Alan Chartock, Albany County District Attorney David Soares, Former EPA Regional Administrator Judith Enck, Siena College economic professor Aaron Pacitti, and James Ketterer, Dean of International Studies at Bard College and academic director of the Bard Globalization and International Affairs program.

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