The Roundtable | WAMC

The Roundtable

Weekdays, 9:00 a.m. - 12:00 p.m.

Credit Peter Steiner

 WAMC's The Roundtable is an award-winning, nationally recognized eclectic talk program. The show airs from 9 a.m. to noon each weekday and features news, interviews, in-depth discussion, music, and much (much) more! Hosted by Joe Donahue and produced by Sarah LaDuke, The Roundtable tackles serious and lighthearted subjects, looking to explore the many facets of the human condition with civility, respect and responsibility.

The show's hallmark is thoughtful interviews with A-list newsmakers, authors, artists, sports figures, actors, and people with interesting stories to tell. Since hitting the airwaves in May of 2001, The Roundtable has interviewed the likes of Arthur Miller, Kurt Vonnegut, Maya Angelou, Madeleine Albright, Jimmy Carter, John McCain, Bob Dole, Steve Martin, James Taylor, Stephen King, Melissa Etheridge, Lin-Manuel Miranda and lots of other really cool people. Plus, Wilco does our theme song. What more can you ask for?

If you would like to be on the show email us at roundtable@wamc.org. Send your comments or questions for The Roundtable Panel to panel@wamc.org

The Roundtable is also available as a podcast.  Subscribe today!

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10:50 - Congressional Corner
11:10 - Earth Wise

11:50 - The Slowdown

Book Picks lists are here.

Music played on the show can be found here.

You may also hear Pulse of the Planet and Sound Beat on The Roundtable.

For the majority of young adults today, the transition to independence is a time of excitement and possibility. But nearly five million young people experience entry into adulthood as abrupt abandonment, a time of disconnection from school, work, and family.

For this growing population of Americans, which includes kids aging out of foster care and those entangled with the justice system, life screeches to a halt when adulthood arrives. The new book, “Abandoned,” is an exploration of this tale of dead ends and broken dreams.

Journalist Anne Kim weaves heart-rending stories of young people navigating early adulthood alone, in communities where poverty is endemic and opportunities almost nonexistent. She then describes a growing awareness, including new research from the field of adolescent brain science, that “emerging adulthood” is just as crucial a developmental period as early childhood, and she profiles an array of unheralded programs that provide young people with the supports they need to achieve self-sufficiency.

Racial tension in America has become a recurring topic of conversation in politics, the media, and everyday life. There are numerous explanations as to why this has become a predominant subject in today’s news and who is to blame. Our next guest says, as Americans prepare once again to cast their Presidential ballots, it’s more important than ever to have a smart and thoughtful conversation about race.

In “Getting Smart About Race,” sociology professor Margaret Andersen discusses why racial healing should be an integral element of our everyday discussions surrounding race and how to move the conversation in a positive direction.

Chie Fueki, Super, 2004, acrylic, ink, graphite and glitter on paper on board, courtesy of Shoshana Wayne Gallery
tang.skidmore.edu

The Tang Teaching Museum at Skidmore College’s latest exhibition, "FLEX," opens tomorrow.

"FLEX" continues the Tang’s tradition of faculty-curated exhibitions. It brings together contemporary and historical art and material culture to consider how classical ideals, muscular physiques and heroic images intersect, and how muscled bodies represent changing notions of bravery, beauty, and health.

The exhibition will feature plaster casts of ancient sculptures juxtaposed with comic books, superhero figurines, bodybuilder photographs, and work by contemporary artists such as Nick Cave, Lucy Kim, Nancy Spero, and Andres Serrano.

Tonight in conjunction with the exhibition, the Tang’s Dunkerley Dialogue series features exhibiting artist Andres Serrano in conversation with Skidmore Professor of photography Robert ParkeHarrison.

We are joined by Ian Berry, the Dayton Director of the Tang, and two Skidmore College faculty members who co-curated "FLEX:" Dan Curley, of the Classics Department, and Gregory Spinner, of the Religious Studies Department.

File: Governor Andrew Cuomo at Norsk Titanium in Plattsburgh
Pat Bradley/WAMC

New York Gov. Andrew Cuomo speaks with WAMC's Alan Chartock on The Roundtable Feb. 21, 2020.

2/21/20 Panel

Feb 21, 2020

  The Roundtable Panel: a daily open discussion of issues in the news and beyond.

Today's panelists are WAMC's Alan Chartock, investigative reporter and UAlbany adjunct professor Rosemary Armao, Senior Fellow and Visiting Professor at Bennington College, Founder of Beyond Plastics, former EPA regional administrator Judith Enck, and Siena College Economic Professor Aaron Pacitti. 

Mark Zuckerberg built the original Facebook in barely one week during his sophomore year of college. Today, with almost 3 billion users, Facebook is an omnipresent global force. The company began with a gloriously idealistic goal: to connect the world. But Facebook has recently been bombarded with controversies surrounding election-influencing "fake news" accounts, the handling of its users' personal data, and the enormous power of its founder/CEO over what the world sees and says.

For three years, celebrated tech writer Steven Levy has had unprecedented access to Facebook’s key executives and employees, including Mark Zuckerberg and Sheryl Sandberg. His new book "Facebook: The Inside Story" digs deep into the company’s history, revealing fascinating new insights as he tells the full story of the company that has changed the world and reaped the consequences.

In celebration of Black History Month, the Palace Theatre in Albany will be presenting an evening of art, music and spoken word by some of the most talented Black artists in the Capital Region.

The Black History Month Celebration on Sunday night at 6 p.m. is a free show and open to all to attend. Music will be provided by DJ Trumastr and there will be a special performances by the Black Upstate Theatre Troupe.

To tell us more we welcome Palace Theatre Director of Community Engagement and Signature Events Karen Dyer, Palace Theatre Director of Marketing Sean Allen, and local actor, director, playwright performing at the Black History Month Celebration, Aaron Moore.

  Shawn Stone joins us to talk about what he's seen lately and what cultural events are coming up this week in our region.

Seen: "Downhill"

Upcoming:

  • "Magic" - GE Theatre at Proctors, Schenectady, Thursday 2/20, 7 PM
  • Low Lily - Caffe Lena, Saratoga Springs, Thursday 2/20, 7 PM
  • "Jerry Lee Lewis vs Jerry Lee Lewis" - Cohoes Music Hall, Cohoes, opens Thursday 2/20, 8 PM through March 8
  • The National Reserve - Hangar on the Hudson, Troy, Friday 2/21, 8 PM
  • Kamasi Washington, Honeycomb - Calvin Theater, Northampton, Mass., Saturday 2/22, 8 PM
  • Bindlestiff Family Cirkus - Helsinki Hudson, Saturday 2/22, 9 PM
  • Jennifer Frautschi, violin, Jeewon Park, piano, Edward Arron (cello) - music of Schumann, Kodaly, Debussy, Beethoven - Clark Art Institute, Williamstown, Mass., Sunday 2/23, 2 PM
  • Trixie Mattel - The Egg, Albany, Sunday 2/23, 8 PM
  • "The Princess Bride" - Palace Theatre, Albany, Monday 2/24, 7 PM

New movies: "The Assistant," "The Call of the Wild," "The Lodge," "Olympic Dreams"

2/20/20 Panel

Feb 20, 2020

         The Roundtable Panel: a daily open discussion of issues in the news and beyond.

Today's panelists are WAMC’s Alan Chartock, investigative reporter and UAlbany adjunct professor Rosemary Armao, Siena College Professor of Comparative Politics Vera Eccarius-Kelly, and Tetherless World Professor of Computer, Web and Cognitive Sciences at RPI and Director of the RPI-IBM Artificial Intelligence research collaboration Jim Hendler, and Vice President for Editorial Development at the New York Press Association Judy Patrick.

Lewis Black is a Grammy Award-winning stand-up comedian and his 2020 tour, ‘It Gets Better Every Day’ is coming to UPAC in Kingston, New York on February 22.

Known as the king of the rant, Black returns to UPAC with his trademark style of comedic yelling and animated finger-pointing, skewering anything and anyone that gets under his skin.

Is it possible that a man is in prison for the murder of his wife -- when an owl actually committed the crime? What is a very special bourbon going for on the black market -- and why? How does a seemingly typical person get roped into counterfeiting money by their boyfriend? “Criminal” is an award-winning true-crime podcast, distributed by PRX and Radiotopia, with episodes devoted to these stories and many others.

On Saturday, February 22 “Criminal” will be in The Hunter Center at MASS MoCA in North Adams, Massachusetts. “Criminal” launched January of 2014 and is hosted by Phoebe Judge, who co-created the show with Lauren Spohrer. Judge attended the Salt Institute for Documentary Studies, her work has won multiple Edward R. Murrow and Associated Press awards. Previously, she was a host at WUNC North Carolina Public Radio, a producer for The Story with Dick Gordon, and a reporter based in the gulf coast of Mississippi. She covered the BP oil spill and the aftermath of Hurricane Katrina for Mississippi Public Broadcasting and National Public Radio.

Tony-winning director Bartlett Sher and the team behind “South Pacific,” “The King and I” and 2017 Tony-winning Best Play “Oslo,” bring a fresh and authentic vision to “Fiddler on the Roof” a beloved theatrical masterpiece from Tony winner Joseph Stein and Pulitzer Prize winners Jerry Bock and Sheldon Harnick – now on tour at Proctors in Schenectady, New York through Sunday.

The original production won ten Tony Awards, including a special Tony for becoming the longest-running Broadway musical of all time. This new production features movement and dance from acclaimed Israeli choreographer Hofesh Shechter, based on the original staging by Jerome Robbins.

A wonderful cast and a lavish orchestra tell this heartwarming story of fathers and daughters, husbands and wives, and the timeless traditions that define faith and family.

Maite Uzal plays Golde in the production. As Tevye’s wife of twenty-five years and mother of his five daughters, Golde is an efficient helpmate and traditionalist, faced with changes of a “new world.”

Gov. Cuomo On WAMC's Roundtable
Gov. Cuomo On WAMC's Roundtable

WAMC's Alan Chartock interviews New York Gov. Andrew Cuomo on WAMC's Roundtable program Feb. 19, 2020.

2/19/20 Panel

Feb 19, 2020

  The Roundtable Panel: a daily open discussion of issues in the news and beyond.

Today's panelists are WAMC's Alan Chartock, investigative journalist and UAlbany adjunct professor Rosemary Armao, Times Union Columnist Chris Churchill, SUNY New Paltz Communications Professor and former NYS Senator Terry Gipson, Dean of the College of Emergency Preparedness, Homeland Security and Cybersecurity at the University at Albany Robert Griffin.

In the late 1930s, the federal government embarked on an unusual project. As a part of the Works Progress Administration's efforts to give jobs to unemployed Americans, government workers tracked down 3,000 men and women who had been enslaved before and during the Civil War. The workers asked them probing questions about slave life. What did they think about their slaveholders? What songs did they sing? What games did they play? Did they always think about escaping?

The result was a remarkable compilation of interviews known as the Slave Narratives.

The new book, "River of Blood: American Slavery from the People Who Lived It," highlights those narratives; condensing tens of thousands of pages into short excerpts from about 100 former slaves and pairs their accounts with their photographs, taken by the workers sent to record their stories. Richard Cahan is a noted photo historian. He has teamed up to produce more than twelve books. Most are based on long-lost archives or photographic collections.

Our Falling into Place series spotlights the important work of -and fosters collaboration between- not-for-profit organizations in our communities; allowing us all to fall into place.

Falling Into Place is supported by The Seymour Fox Memorial Foundation, Providing a helping hand to turn inspiration into accomplishment. See more possibilities … see more promise… see more progress.

This morning we focus on the Eastern New York Region chapter of the American Red Cross. We are joined by Regional Philanthropy Officer Derek Dobson and Volunteer Recruitment Specialist Lauren Whitman.

    This week's Book Picks come to us from Sadie Trombetta of Odyssey Bookshop in South Hadley, Massachusetts.

List:
“Everywhere You Don't Belong” by Gabriel Bump - event 2/26
“Upright Women Wanted” by Sarah Gailey
“The Genius of Women” by Janice Kaplan - event 2/19
“Tell Me How It Ends: An Essay in 40 Questions” by Valeria Luiselli
“Something That May Shock and Discredit You” by Daniel Mallory Ortberg
“Saint X” by Alexis Schaitkin
“Enter the Aardvark” by Jessica Anthony (Pub date: 3/24)

Impeachment is over and President Trump is emboldened.

In today’s Congressional Corner, David Hawkings of The Fulcrum speaks with WAMC’s Alan Chartock.

2/18/20 Panel

Feb 18, 2020

  The Roundtable Panel: a daily open discussion of issues in the news and beyond.

Today's panelists are WAMC’s Alan Chartock, investigative reporter and adjunct professor at UAlbany Rosemary Armao, The Empire Report’s J.P. Miller, political consultant and lobbyist Libby Post, and former Associate Editor of The Times Union, Mike Spain.

Imagine an event that brings hundreds of Members of Congress, from both chambers and parties, together for an evening to learn about and revel in American history. Not only is it true, it’s happened more than 38 times over the past six years.

In 2013, David Rubenstein, philanthropist and co-founder of The Carlyle Group, approached the Librarian of Congress with an idea for an event series in which Members of Congress could put politics aside and immerse themselves in the history of the nation. Thereafter began the Congressional Dialogue series: a dinner event held several times a year during which historic artifacts are exhibited and Rubenstein interviews bestselling and award-winning authors and historians for a Congressional audience.

Now, in Rubenstein’s book, “The American Story: Conversations with Master Historians,” these compelling conversations with the biggest names in American history are presented for all to learn and enjoy.

Our Falling into Place series spotlights the important work of -and fosters collaboration between- not-for-profit organizations in our communities; allowing us all to fall into place.

Falling Into Place is supported by The Seymour Fox Memorial Foundation, Providing a helping hand to turn inspiration into accomplishment. See more possibilities … see more promise… see more progress.

Today we are joined by Eileen Spath, the Communications Manager at Catholic Charities of the Diocese of Albany – she will tell us about the organization's work and outreach and its new initiative, CC MOVE.

Catholic Charities of the Diocese of Albany is one of the largest, private, social service agencies in the region, helping more than 89,000 people each year in the fourteen counties of the Albany Diocese. Their mission is to address basic human need at all stages of life regardless of race, religious belief, ethnicity, or lifestyle.

This is a photo of Congressman Richard Neal.
WAMC

In today’s Congressional Corner, Massachusetts Congressman Richard Neal continues wraps up his conversation with WAMC’s Alan Chartock.

2/14/20 Panel

Feb 14, 2020

The Roundtable Panel: a daily open discussion of issues in the news and beyond.

Today's panelists are WAMC's Alan Chartock, President and CEO The Business Council of New York State Heather Briccetti, Senior Fellow and Visiting Professor at Bennington College, Founder of Beyond Plastics, former EPA regional administrator Judith Enck, Siena College Economic Professor Aaron Pacitti, and Albany County District Attorney David Soares.

“Everyone lies about their lives. What would happen if you shared the truth instead?” These are the opening lines in the little green notebook Monica finds in the café she owns, lines that will change her life forever, in Clare Pooley’s debut novel, “The Authenticity Project.”

This green notebook, with the words “The Authenticity Project” scrawled across the front, will travel from the little neighborhood of Fulham in London, around the world to Thailand and back. As it does, it is passed into the hands of six strangers, who use the notebook to reveal their true selves. In the process, they are able to connect with people in real life.

Clare Pooley knows exactly what it’s like to hide behind a life that looks perfect from the outside. For twenty years she worked in advertising and also maintained the outward appearance of the perfectly happy wife and mother, all while obscuring the realities of motherhood and her drinking problem.

Pooley admits that sharing her truth with the public was terrifying, but it changed her life for the better, and soon she began to wonder: what would happen if everyone did the same? Thus, the idea for “The Authenticity Project” was born.

JoAnn Falletta
Brendan Bannon

This Friday, February 14 The Albany Symphony Orchestra will present a romantic evening for classical music lovers at Proctors in Schenectady, New York.

The program will feature Dame Ethel Smyth’s Concerto for Violin, Horn, and Orchestra featuring Jill Levy and Jacek Muzyk; Roussel’s Bacchus et Ariane Suite; and selections from Prokofiev’s Romeo and Juliet. Grammy-winning conductor JoAnn Falletta will lead the orchestra as guest conductor.

Falletta serves as Music Director of the Buffalo Philharmonic Orchestra and the Virginia Symphony Orchestra, Principal Guest Conductor of the Brevard Music Center and Artistic Adviser of the Hawaii Symphony Orchestra. The New York Times has referred to Falletta as “...one of the finest conductors of her generation.”

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