The Roundtable

Weekdays, 9 a.m.

Credit Peter Steiner

 WAMC's The Roundtable is an award-winning, nationally recognized eclectic talk program. The show airs from 9 a.m. to noon each weekday and features news, interviews, in-depth discussion, music, and much (much) more! Hosted by Joe Donahue and produced by Sarah LaDuke, The Roundtable tackles serious and lighthearted subjects, looking to explore the many facets of the human condition with civility, respect and responsibility.

The show's hallmark is thoughtful interviews with A-list newsmakers, authors, artists, sports figures, actors, and people with interesting stories to tell. Since hitting the airwaves in May of 2001, The Roundtable has interviewed the likes of Arthur Miller, Kurt Vonnegut, Maya Angelou, Madeleine Albright, Jimmy Carter, John McCain, Bob Dole, Steve Martin, James Taylor, Stephen King, Melissa Etheridge, Lin-Manuel Miranda and lots of other really cool people. Plus, Wilco does our theme song. What more can you ask for?

If you would like to be on the show email us at roundtable@wamc.org. Send your comments or questions for The Roundtable Panel to panel@wamc.org

The Roundtable is also available as a podcast.  Subscribe today!

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10:50 - Congressional Corner
11:10 - Earth Wise

11:50 - The Slowdown

Book Picks lists are here.

You may also hear Pulse of the Planet and Sound Beat on The Roundtable.

Farming has been in John Connell's family for generations, but he never intended to follow in his father's footsteps. Until, one winter, after more than a decade away, he finds himself back on the farm.

Connell records the hypnotic rhythm of the farming day—cleaning the barns, caring for the herd, tending to sickly lambs, helping the cows give birth. Alongside the routine events, there are the unforeseen moments when things go wrong: when a calf fails to thrive, when a sheep goes missing, when illness breaks out, when an argument between father and son erupts and things are said that cannot be unsaid.

"The Farmer’s Son" is the story of a calving season, and the story of a man who emerges from depression to find hope in the place he least expected to find it.

Alva Noë is a Professor of Philosophy at the University of California, Berkeley, where he is also a member of the Center for New Media and the Institute for Cognitive and Brain Sciences. Noë is a 2012 recipient of a Guggenheim Fellowship and he was a weekly contributor to National Public Radio’s science and culture blog 13.7 Cosmos and Culture.

His new book is "Infinite Baseball: Notes from a Philosopher at the Ballpark."

Baseball is a strange sport: it consists of long periods in which little seems to be happening, punctuated by high-energy outbursts of rapid fire activity. Because of this, despite ever greater profits, Major League Baseball is bent on finding ways to shorten games, and to tailor baseball to today's shorter attention spans. But for the true fan, baseball is always compelling to watch and intellectually fascinating. It's superficially slow-pace is an opportunity to participate in the distinctive thinking practice that defines the game. If baseball is boring, it's boring the way philosophy is boring: not because there isn't a lot going on, but because the challenge baseball poses is making sense of it all.

In "Infinite Baseball," philosopher and baseball fan Alva Noë explores the many unexpected ways in which baseball is truly a philosophical kind of game.

U.S. Representative for New York's 22nd congressional district Anthony Brindisi
Official Portrait 116th Congress

The Squad was battling Speaker Pelosi. Then President Trump logged on.

In today’s Congressional Corner, Anthony Brindisi of New York’s 22nd Congressional district wraps up his conversation with WAMC’s Alan Chartock.

Shawn Stone joins us to talk about what he's seen lately and what cultural events are coming up this week in our region.

Seen: "Spider-Man: Far from Home"

Upcoming:
French Cancan - Clark Art Institute, Williamstown, Mass., Thursday 7/18, 2 PM
Jonatha Brooke - Caffe Lena, Saratoga Springs, Thursday 7/18, 7 PM
John Mayer - Times Union Center, Albany, Friday 7/19, 7:30 PM
Bettye Lavette - Helsinki Hudson, Hudson, Friday 7/19, 9 PM
Taj Mahal Quartet: Giant/De Ole Folks at Home 50th Anniversary Concert - The Egg, Albany, Saturday 7/20, 8 PM
Catalyst Quartet with pianist Daniel Gortler (music of Bach, Glass, Brahms, Franck) - Maverick Concerts, Woodstock, Sunday 7/21, 4 PM
Heart, Sheryl Crow, Lucie Silvas - SPAC, Amphitheater, Saratoga Spa State Park, Saratoga Springs, Sunday 7/21, 7 PM
Godsmack - Cool Insuring Arena, Glens Falls, Sunday 7/21, 8 PM
"Finding Nemo" (Free Summer Movie Series) - Palace Theatre, Albany, Tuesday 7/23, 1 PM (doors at noon)
Stephen Marley - Empire State Plaza, Albany, Wednesday 7/24, 5:30 PM

New movies: "The Lion King," "The Art of Self-Defense"

7/18/19 Panel

20 hours ago

   The Roundtable Panel: a daily open discussion of issues in the news and beyond.

Today's panelists are WAMC’s Alan Chartock, SUNY New Paltz Communications Professor and former NYS Senator Terry Gipson, Investigative Journalist Rosemary Armao, Siena College Professor of Comparative Politics Vera Eccarius-Kelly.

Patricia S. Churchland is the author of "Conscience: The Origins of Moral Intuition" and "Touching a Nerve: Our Brains, Our Selves." She is professor emerita of philosophy at the University of California, San Diego, and the recipient of a MacArthur Fellowship.

In "Touching a Nerve," Churchland, the distinguished founder of neurophilosophy, drew from scientific research on the brain to understand its philosophical and ethical implications for identity, consciousness, free will, and memory. In "Conscience," she explores how moral systems arise from our physical selves in combination with environmental demands. All social groups have ideals for behavior, even though ethics vary among different cultures and among individuals within each culture.

Less and less Christian demographically, America is now home to an ever-larger number of people who say they identify with no religion at all. These non-Christians have increasingly been demanding their full participation in public life, bringing their arguments all the way to the Supreme Court. The law is on their side, but that doesn't mean that their attempts are not met with suspicion or outright hostility.

In "Our Non-Christian Nation," Jay Wexler travels the country to engage the non-Christians who have called on us to maintain our ideals of inclusivity and diversity.

U.S. Representative for New York's 22nd congressional district Anthony Brindisi
Official Portrait 116th Congress

Lawmakers in Washington are hashing out one of the biggest bills of the year.

In today’s Congressional Corner, Anthony Brindisi of New York’s 22nd Congressional district continues his conversation with WAMC’s Alan Chartock.

Recent events have turned the spotlight on the issue of race in modern America, and the current cultural climate calls out for more research, education, dialogue, and understanding. "Race and Social Change: A Quest, A Study, A Call to Action" focuses on a provocative social science experiment with the potential to address these needs.

Author Max Klau explains how his own quest for insight into these matters led to the empirical study at the heart of this book, and he presents the results of years of research that integrate findings at the individual, group, and whole system levels of analysis.

7/17/19 Panel

Jul 17, 2019

    The Roundtable Panel: a daily open discussion of issues in the news and beyond.

Today's panelists are WAMC’s Alan Chartock, Investigative Journalist Rosemary Armao, Berkshire Eagle Reporter Jenn Smith, Times Union Columnist Chris Churchill, Dean of the College of Emergency Preparedness, Homeland Security and Cybersecurity at the University at Albany Robert Griffin.

Special Events At MiSci

Jul 16, 2019

MiSci - Museum of Innovation & Science in Schenectady, New York presents exhibits, programs, and events designed to inspire people to celebrate and explore science and technology, past present, and future. This morning we learned about MiSci’s special events – including After Dark events and Family Day experiences.

The After Dark series is a social event for adults 21+ featuring full museum access, adult beverages, planetarium shows, and exciting science demonstrations. This summer, MiSci presents the exhibition “Wolf to Woof: The Story of Dogs” and this Friday’s “After Dark” event is “After Dark: Pints and Pups.”

Saturday’s Family Day event is a Lunar Engagement Day - an Apollo 11 50th Anniversary Event.

Dan Beck is the Director of Membership & Special Events at MiSci and he joins us along with Vice President of Marketing & Communications Tara Burnham.

The 2019 Open Studios of Washington County will feature 15 artists working across a range of mediums, including painting, photography, clay arts, and sculpture. Since the arts are vital to the cultural diversity and enrichment of the region, the event helps ensure the rich artistic tradition will continue.

The event now happens over four days and will run from July 19th through July 21st. Joining us to tell us all about it, we welcome Beth Moeller – an organizer of Open Studios of Washington County -and two of the featured artists, Leslie Peck and Rebecca Sparks.

  This week's Book Picks come to us from Joan Grenier of Odyssey Bookshop in South Hadley, Massachusetts.

List:
“The Great Alone: Walking the Pacific Crest Trail” by Tim Voors
“Feast Your Eyes” by Myla Goldberg
“Giants of the Monsoon Forest: Living and Working with Elephants” by Jacob Shell
“Flight Portfolio” by Julie Orringer
“Reckoning The Epic Battle Against Sexual Abuse and Harassment” by Linda Hirshman - Event 7/16

U.S. Representative for New York's 22nd congressional district Anthony Brindisi
Official Portrait 116th Congress

Will lawmakers in Washington ever agree to an infrastructure deal?

In today’s Congressional Corner, Anthony Brindisi of New York’s 22nd Congressional district speaks with WAMC’s Alan Chartock.

The Berkshire Jewish Festival of Books in Great Barrington, MA begins later this week; running from Thursday, July 18 through Sunday, July 21.

This four day event will be full of lectures, teachings, and readings by local, national, and international authors in diverse genres from adult fiction to children’s literature to cookbooks.

This celebration of Jewish literature will take place at Hevreh of Southern Berkshire in Great Barrington. Avi Dresner is co-chair of: The Berkshires’ Jewish Festival of Books.

7/16/19 Panel

Jul 16, 2019

  The Roundtable Panel: a daily open discussion of issues in the news and beyond.

Today's panelists are WAMC’s Alan Chartock, The Empire Report’s J.P. Miller, Edward Hamilton Distinguished Professor of Computer Science at RPI and Faculty Associate at the Berkman Klein Center for Internet and Society at Harvard University and Harvard Data Science Initiative Fellow Fran Berman, Dean of International Studies at Bard College and Academic Director of the Bard Globalization and International Affairs program Jim Ketterer, and Investigative Journalist Rosemary Armao.

Safi Bahcall received his BA summa cum laude in physics from Harvard and his PhD from Stanford. After working for three years as a consultant for McKinsey, he co-founded a biotechnology company developing new drugs for cancer. He led its IPO and served as its CEO for 13 years. In 2008, he was named E&Y New England Biotechnology Entrepreneur of the Year. In 2011, he worked with President Obama's council of science advisors (PCAST) on the future of national research.

In "Loonshots," Bahcall reveals a surprising new way of thinking about the mysteries of group behavior that challenges everything we thought we knew about nurturing radical breakthroughs.

David K. Randall is a senior reporter at Reuters and The New York Times best-selling author of "Dreamland" and "The King and Queen of Malibu."

For Chinese immigrant Wong Chut King, surviving in San Francisco meant a life in the shadows. His passing on March 6, 1900, would have been unremarkable if a city health officer hadn’t noticed a swollen black lymph node on his groin: a sign of bubonic plague.

Empowered by racist pseudoscience, officials rushed to quarantine Chinatown while doctors examined Wong’s tissue for telltale bacteria. If the devastating disease was not contained, San Francisco would become the American epicenter of an outbreak that had already claimed ten million lives worldwide.

In "Black Death at the Golden Gate: The Race to Save America from the Bubonic Plague," Randall shares this little known story of an avoided epidemic.

The New York City Ballet will return to its summer home, the Saratoga Performing Arts Center, for four distinct programs over seven performances July 16 -20. The run will be highlighted by the story-ballet "Coppélia." Considered one of the greatest comedic ballets of the 19th Century, "Coppélia" premiered in Saratoga in 1974 and was co-commissioned by SPAC.

Sterling Hyltin is a dancer with the New York City Ballet. She will be performing in two dances during the season at SPAC: Varied Trio (in four) (Harrison/Frohlich) and Apollo (Stravinsky/Balanchine).

Hoosick Blooms 2019 Tour takes place on Saturday, July 20th from 9:30 am to 4:30 pm. Six private and very diverse gardens and farms will welcome visitors on the Hoosick Blooms 2019 tour. Following a watercolor map created especially with an eye to beautiful views, participants on this self-driving tour will see unique gardens tucked into the rolling hills of Hoosick and neighboring communities.

Three properties on the tour, Jermain Hill Farm, Berle Farm and the Historic Barns of Nipmoose, are conserved as Forever Farmland by the Agricultural Stewardship Association and the Fraser/McDonald House has received designation as an official Wildlife Habitat by the National Wildlife Federation. The Fraser site is also the birthplace of Simon Fraser who became a renowned Canadian explorer.

Hoosick Blooms 2019 benefits CiviCure’s fund for the renovation of the historic Wood Block Building and Opera House. We welcome CiviCure board member Melodee James; Manager of Grants and Programs for CiviCure Jayne Stokes; and Executive Director, Agricultural Stewardship Association (ASA) Teri Ptacek - who will tell us about the Forever Farmland Supper by the Agricultural Stewardship Association.

This summer, Saratoga Shakespeare Company celebrates its 19th season with two of Shakespeare’s greatest works in two different venues: "King Lear" in Historic Congress Park and "The Tempest" on the grounds of the Saratoga Performing Arts Center.

Both productions deal with themes of stormy family relationships, human frailty, revenge, and redemption.

Building on last year’s successful collaboration, Saratoga Shakespeare begins the season joining forces with SPAC and Radial Arts to present Poetry in the Pines, bringing a new, innovative and music-filled production of "The Tempest" on the SPAC grounds. Performances will take place at the Reflecting Pool on Friday, July 19 at 2 p.m. and 5 p.m. and on Saturday, July 20 at 11 a.m.

"King Lear" opens the following week with performances on Tuesday, July 23 through Saturday, July 27 and Tuesday, July 30 through Saturday, August 3. All performances will be at 6 p.m. in Congress Park, Saratoga Springs, on the Alfred Z. Solomon Stage.

We we welcome Saratoga Shakespeare Company Artistic Director Lary Opitz (who is playing King Lear); and production Directors Marcus Dean Fuller ("The Tempest") and Wesley Broulik ("King Lear").

File photo: New York Governor Andrew Cuomo
Pat Bradley/WAMC

WAMC's Alan Chartock interviews New York Gov. Andrew Cuomo on Monday, July 15, 2019.

7/15/19 Panel

Jul 15, 2019

The Roundtable Panel: a daily open discussion of issues in the news and beyond.

Today's panelists are WAMC’s Alan Chartock, Political Consultant Libby Post, Albany Law School Professor and Director of the Immigration Law Clinic Sarah Rogerson, Tetherless World Professor of Computer, Web and Cognitive Sciences at RPI and Director of the RPI-IBM Artificial Intelligence research collaboration Jim Hendler, and Investigative Journalist Rosemary Armao.

Dorset Theatre Festival Resident Playwright Theresa Rebeck – author of Roundabout Theatre Company's 2018 Broadway production "Bernhardt/Hamlet" - has developed more than six productions at Dorset that have gone on to other stages around the country, including 2017’s "Downstairs" starring Tim Daly and Tyne Daly, which ran Off-Broadway at Primary Stages in the fall of last year.

The most Broadway-produced female playwright of our time, Rebeck returns to the Dorset Theatre Festival with "Dig" – running through July 27th.

A dying plant shop in a dying urban neighborhood receives a visitor from the past: Meghan, the neighborhood screw-up, whose suicide attempt followed a terrible tragedy. Roger, the store owner, wants nothing to do with this situation, but Meghan is improbably clinging to life. Can a soul beyond saving be saved? It is a play about courage, redemption and photosynthesis.

Up until the 1960s and 70s, there had been few, if any, human beings who were forced to live their lives under such intense media scrutiny as John F. Kennedy Jr. did.

Born in 1960, at the dawn of the television era. His father, a master of the new medium, used his young family to project a false, but highly attractive, image of himself as a wholesome family man. President Kennedy’s assassination increased public pressure on John even though he was only a boy. The salute by that little boy in blue at his father’s casket cemented the belief that John would be the natural heir to his father’s legacy.

"America’s Reluctant Prince" is a biography of JFK jr. by Steven Gillon - Scholar-in-Residence at The History Channel and Professor of History at the University of Oklahoma. There is also a corresponding documentary with A&E, which is based on the book and features Steven Gillon, “JFK JR – The Final Years,” and it will premiere on July 16, the 20th anniversary of JFK. Jr’s death.

Congressman Joe Courtney
http://courtney.house.gov/biography/

America’s Vietnam veterans are still fighting for their rights. In today’s Congressional Corner, WAMC’s Alan Chartock wraps up his interview with Connecticut Representative Joe Courtney, a Democrat from the 2nd district.

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