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Imani Perry to speak at Juneteenth event at The Bardavon

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princeton.edu
Imani Perry

The Poughkeepsie Public Library District and The Bardavon are presenting a Juneteenth event at the Bardavon in Poughkeepsie, New York on Sunday, June 19 with Imani Perry – a Princeton scholar of race, law and African-American culture who will speak about her new book, "South to America: A Journey Below the Mason-Dixon to Understand the Soul of a Nation."

Imani Perry joins us with a preview.

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Joe talks to people on the radio for a living. In addition to countless impressive human "gets" - he has talked to a lot of Muppets. Joe grew up in Philadelphia, has been on the area airwaves for more than 25 years and currently lives in Washington County, NY with his wife, Kelly, and their dog, Brady. And yes, he reads every single book.
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