SCOTUS

In fewer than three hundred words, Khizr Khan electrified viewers around the world when he took the stage at the 2016 Democratic National Convention. And when he offered to lend Donald Trump his own much-read and dog-eared pocket Constitution, his gesture perfectly encapsulated the feelings of millions by challenging Trump's call to stop Muslims from entering the U.S.

In response, Trump questioned the Khan's motives and religion, even though they are Gold Star parents whose son was killed in Iraq. Today, Donald Trump is president and Khizr Khan is the author of a new book, "An American Family: A Memoir of Hope and Sacrifice" – just out in paperback. He has also written a book for young readers entitled, "This Is Our Constitution: Discover America with a Gold Star Father."

Khan was in Albany, New York to participate in New York State Writers Institute's Albany Book Festival at the University at Albany.

Congressman Paul Tonko
Congressman Paul Tonko

Once again, a Supreme Court nominee is facing 11th hour questions about his past. In today’s Congressional Corner, New York Congressman Paul Tonko, a Democrat from the 20th district, speaks with WAMC’s Alan Chartock.

With the retirement of Justice Anthony Kennedy, the Court has never before been more central in American life. It is the nine justices who too often now decide the controversial issues of our time—from abortion and same-sex marriage, to gun control, campaign finance and voting rights.

The Court is so crucial that many voters in 2016 made their choice based on whom they thought their presidential candidate would name to the Court. Donald Trump picked Neil Gorsuch—the key decision of his new administration. The next justice—replacing Anthony Kennedy—will be even more important, holding the swing vote over so much social policy. Is that really how democracy is supposed to work?

David A. Kaplan is the former legal affairs of Newsweek, where he covered the Court for a decade. His other books include "The Silicon Boys," "The Accidental President," and "Mine’s Bigger." A graduate of Cornell and the New York University School of Law, he teaches courses in journalism and ethics at NYU.

His new book is "The Most Dangerous Branch: Inside the Supreme Court's Assault on the Constitution."

9/6/18 Panel

Sep 6, 2018

The Roundtable Panel:a daily open discussion of issues in the news and beyond.

Today's panelists are WAMC’s Alan Chartock, Daily Freeman Publisher Emeritus Ira Fusfeld, Siena College Professor of Comparative Politics, Vera Eccarius-Kelly and Professor of Journalism at the College of St. Rose Cailin Brown.

Today's Roundtable Panel was live from 8 a.m. to 9 a.m. Featuring discussions on Supreme Court nominee Brett Kavanaugh's confirmation hearings.

9/5/18 Panel

Sep 5, 2018

  The Roundtable Panel: a daily open discussion of issues in the news and beyond.

Today's panelists are WAMC’s Alan Chartock, Times Union Associate Editor Mike Spain, Political Consultant Libby Post and Berkshire Eagle Reporter Jenn Smith, and Dean of International Studies at Bard College and Academic Director of the Bard Globalization and International Affairs program James Ketterer.

Today's Roundtable Panel was live from 8 a.m. to 9 a.m. to discuss and accommodate NPR's special coverage of Supreme Court nominee Brett Kavanaugh's confirmation hearings.

 

The struggle to desegregate America's schools was a grassroots movement, and young women were its vanguard. In the late 1940s, parents began to file desegregation lawsuits with their daughters, forcing Thurgood Marshall and other civil rights lawyers to take up the issue and bring it to the Supreme Court. After the Brown v. Board of Education ruling, girls far outnumbered boys in volunteering to desegregate formerly all-white schools.

In "A Girl Stands at the Door," historian Rachel Devlin tells the remarkable stories of these desegregation pioneers. She also explains why black girls were seen, and saw themselves, as responsible for the difficult work of reaching across the color line in public schools. 

Rachel Devlin is an associate professor of history at Rutgers University.

Rep. Peter Welch
photo provided

President Trump’s influence on the Supreme Court could be felt for decades.

In today’s Congressional Corner, Vermont Representative Peter Welch continues his conversation with WAMC’s Alan Chartock.

The Supreme Court is entering a period of change.

In today’s Congressional Corner, New York representative Sean Patrick Maloney, a Democrat from the 18th district, speaks with WAMC’s Alan Chartock.

Please note: this conversation was recorded before President Trump announced Brett Kavanaugh as his Supreme Court nomination.

Congressman Paul Tonko
Congressman Paul Tonko

Democrats are lamenting the retirement of Justice Anthony Kennedy.

In today’s Congressional Corner, New York Congressman Paul Tonko, a Democrat from the 20th district, speaks with WAMC’s Alan Chartock.

James F. Simon is dean emeritus at New York Law School. He is the author of nine books on American history, law, and politics, and has won the American Bar Association’s Silver Gavel Award.

His new book, "Eisenhower vs. Warren: The Battle for Civil Rights and Liberties," brings to life the bitter feud between President Dwight D. Eisenhower and Chief Justice Earl Warren framed the tumultuous future of the modern civil rights movement.

Spring is a busy period for the Supreme Court.

In today’s Congressional Corner, Union College political science professor Brad Hays continues his conversation with WAMC’s Alan Chartock.

Adam Winkler is a professor at UCLA School of Law, where he specializes in American constitutional law. His scholarship has been cited by the Supreme Court of the United States and his writing has appeared in the New York Times, Wall Street Journal, Washington Post, Los Angeles Times, New Republic, Atlantic, Slate, and Scotusblog.

In "We the Corporations: How American Businesses Won Their Civil Rights," Winkler reveals how American businesses won equal rights and transformed the Constitution to serve the ends of capital. Corporations - like minorities and women - have had a civil rights movement of their own, and now possess nearly all the same rights as ordinary people.

“Advise and consent” has taken on a new political meaning in the U.S. Senate.

In today’s Congressional Corner, Congressional Quarterly’s David Hawkings speaks with WAMC’s Alan Chartock.

Spring means it’s crunch time for the Supreme Court.

In today’s Congressional Corner, Union College political science professor Brad Hays continues his discussion with WAMC’s Alan Chartock.

Something very unusual would have to happen to keep Neil Gorsuch off the Supreme Court.

In today’s Congressional Corner, Union College political science professor Brad Hays speaks with WAMC’s Alan Chartock.

Congressman Peter Welch
http://www.welch.house.gov/about-peter/

Should Democrats filibuster Judge Neil Gorsuch’s Supreme Court nomination?

In today’s Congressional Corner, Vermont Representative Peter Welch concludes his discussion with WAMC’s Alan Chartock.

2/1/17 Panel

Feb 1, 2017

   The Roundtable Panel: a daily open discussion of issues in the news and beyond.

Today's panelists are WAMC’s Alan Chartock, Director of the Journalism Program at the University at Albany Rosemary Armao, and corporate attorney Rich Honen.

A conservative majority on the Supreme Court is just the tip of the iceberg.

In today’s Congressional Corner, Union College political science professor Brad Hays concludes his discussion with WAMC’s Alan Chartock.

It’s too late for Merrick Garland to get on the Supreme Court.

In today’s Congressional Corner, Union College political science professor Brad Hays tells WAMC’s Alan Chartock why.

The election will have major impacts on the future of the Supreme Court.

In today’s Congressional Corner, Union College political science professor Brad Hays tells WAMC’s Alan Chartock what might happen next.

What does Donald Trump’s election mean for the Supreme Court?

In today’s Congressional Corner, Tim Vercellotti of the Western New England University poll and professor of political science concludes his discussion with WAMC’s Alan Chartock.

In The Constitution Today, Akhil Reed Amar, America’s preeminent constitutional scholar, considers the biggest and most bitterly contested debates of the last two decades and provides a passionate handbook for thinking constitutionally about today’s headlines.

Amar shows how the Constitution’s text, history, and structure are a crucial repository of collective wisdom, providing specific rules and grand themes relevant to every organ of the American body politic.

  The Supreme Court has released some of its highly-anticipated rulings — but with only eight justices weighing in.

In today’s Congressional Corner, Massachusetts Congressman Jim McGovern — a Democrat from the 2nd district — tells WAMC’s Alan Chartock that Merrick Garland hasn’t gotten a fair shake. 

  With only eight jurists, the Supreme Court has been punting of late.

In today’s Congressional Corner, Union College political science professor Brad Hays talks about this new paradigm with WAMC’s Alan Chartock.

Senator Chris Murphy
https://www.murphy.senate.gov/

  The Supreme Court is one justice shy of a baseball team.

In today’s Congressional Corner, Connecticut Senator Chris Murphy tells WAMC’s Alan Chartock he hopes the Merrick Garland standoff doesn’t set a new precedent.

  How did gay and lesbian couples’ right to marry go from unthinkable to inevitable? How did the individual right to bear arms, dismissed as fraudulent by Chief Justice Warren Burger in 1990, become a constitutional right in 2008? And what compelled President George W. Bush to rein in many of his initiatives in the war on terror before leaving office, even though past presidents have had a free hand in wartime? We are likely to answer that, in each case, the Supreme Court remade our nation’s most fundamental law.

Yet as the award-winning legal scholar David Cole argues in Engines of Liberty, citizen activists are the true drivers of constitutional change.

  Our government is failing us. From health care to immigration, from the tax code to climate change, our political institutions cannot deal effectively with the challenges of modern society. Why the dysfunction? Contemporary reformers single out the usual suspects, including polarization and the rise in campaign spending. But what if the roots go much deeper, to the nation’s founding?

In Relic, William Howell and Terry Moe point to the Constitution as the main culprit. The framers designed the Constitution some 225 years ago for a simple agrarian society. But the form of government they settled upon, a separation of powers system with a parochial Congress at its center, is entirely ill-equipped to address the serious social problems that arise in a complex, post-industrial nation. We are prisoners of the past, burdened with an antiquated government that cannot make effective policy, and often cannot do anything at all.

The solution is to update the Constitution for modern times.

     In the decades after the landmark Brown v. Board of Education Supreme Court decision, busing to achieve school desegregation became one of the nation’s most controversial civil rights issues. 

Audio Pending...

  The new book Why Busing Failed examines the pitched battles over busing on a national scale focusing on cities such as Boston, Chicago, New York and Pontiac, Michigan. The book shows how school officials, politicians, the courts and the media disregarded the rights of black students and gave precedents to the desires white parents who opposed desegregation. Why Busing Failed is authored by Matthew Delmont, Associate Professor of History at Arizona State University.

Congresswoman Elizabeth Esty
Congresswoman Elizabeth Esty

  January 20th, 2017. That’s the earliest Senate Majority Leader Mitch McConnell thinks the next Supreme Court justice should be named.

In today’s Congressional Corner, Connecticut Representative Elizabeth Esty tells WAMC’s Alan Chartock about her new “SCOTUS” bill. 

  Merrick Garland appears qualified for the Supreme Court, but he’s stuck in limbo.

In today’s Congressional Corner, WAMC’s Alan Chartock continues his conversation with former Deputy Solicitor General of the U.S. Philip Lacovara. 

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