photographer

When Lawrence Jackson took the job as White House photographer in early 2009, he knew he’d have a front row seat to history. What he didn’t expect was the deep personal connection he would feel, as a fellow African American, with the President Barack Obama.

Lawrence was the only African-American photographer in the Obama White House, which gave him a unique perspective on the first African-American President. In his new book, "Yes We Did: Photos and Behind-the-Scenes Stories Celebrating Our First African American President," Lawrence’s photos and reflections give us a front row seat to this historic administration.

Pete Souza - former Chief Official White House Photographer for President Obama and Director of the White House Photo Office - will give a visual presentation of exclusive photographs contained in his #1 New York Times bestseller "Shade: A Tale of Two Presidents" at the Bardavon in Poughkeepsie, New York for an Oblong Books event on Sunday, November 3 at 7 p.m.

Shade tells the tale of the Obama and Trump years through visual juxtapositions that begin on Inauguration Day and move through the release of the Mueller report. Some call this "throwing shade." Souza calls it telling the truth.

Banner photo for "Broken in Still Beautiful" photo exhibition
Charise Isis

The Grace Project is an empowering photographic project by fine art photographer Charise Isis that captures the courage beauty and grace of those who have had mastectomy surgery as a result of breast cancer.

The very act of standing in front of a camera revealing their scars, allows each of her subjects a transformative experience, giving them permission to step into self acceptance and the opportunity to share the story of the scars that have been written on their body.

The ultimate goal of the Grace project is to photograph 800 portraits, the approximate number of new breast cancer diagnosis in the U.S. every day. Thus far, Charise has photographed well over 400 portraits towards this goal.

The Grace Project exhibition “Broken is Still Beautiful” will be on display at the Idea Garden in Kingston, New York on weekends this month. The opening reception is tomorrow evening.

Lauren Hauser dancing Serenade, 1977
Steven Caras

The photographic work of acclaimed dancer and photographer Steven Caras will be on display at Vassar in Poughkeepsie, New York as the college hosts an exhibition of his work and an artist reception and lecture. All three events are open to the public.

Steven Caras was raised in New Jersey where he began studying ballet at the age of fifteen. Three years later, he was invited to join the New York City Ballet where an enthusiasm for photography joined his passion for dance.

As part of his lecture, “Survival Instinct: A Dancer’s Story of Self-Reinvention,” Caras will show PowerPoint slides and talk about his personal and professional milestones and setbacks.

Melons are among the world’s most important vegetable crops. The new book "The Melon" is produced by Amy Goldman in collaboration with celebrated photographer Victor Schrager over the course of nine years. "The Melon" follows "Melons for the Passionate Grower," published in 2002. In the intervening years, Goldman has grown as a gardener and has learned a lot more. She has taken advantage of recent research findings that informed her thinking on crop history and best cultural practices.

Amy Goldman is a gardener, author, artist, and well-known advocate for seed saving, plant breeding, and heirloom fruits and vegetables. Her mission is to celebrate and catalogue the magnificent diversity of standard, open-pollinated varieties, and to promote their conservation.

Amy Goldman will be at The Rhinebeck Farmers Market on Sunday, September 15 signing her book and discussing melon.

Known for his elegant and minimalist work and his mastery of photographing in natural light, photographer Herb Ritts had a gift for turning stars into icons.

"Herb Ritts: The Rock Portraits" is the first curated collection of his photos of some of music’s most celebrated artists. The exhibition includes images of the likes of David Bowie, Tina Turner, U2, Bruce Springsteen, Paul McCartney, Bob Dylan, Prince, Cher, Madonna and many more.

Also shown with many of his best-known portraits are stage costumes and guitars from the Rock & Roll Hall of Fame. "Herb Ritts: The Rock Portraits" runs through September 2 at the Fenimore Art Museum in Cooperstown, New York. Chris Rossi is the museum’s Director of Exhibitions.

Hudson Hall celebrates iconic dancer and choreographer Merce Cunningham and the Merce Cunningham Centennial with a 6-week program of dance, music, film, and photography to showcase the work of the iconic artist and the enduring power of his living legacy.

Titled “Cunningham at 100,” the program opens at 5pm on June 22nd with an exhibition of photographs by James Klosty and Stephanie Berger.

Stephanie Berger and Executive Director of Hudson Hall Tambra Dillon join us.

Andy at work on a large flower painting, the Factory, NYC, spring 1965
David McCabe / http://davidmccabephotography.com

In late 1964 Andy Warhol commissioned young fashion photographer David McCabe to document his daily activities for one year. During the course of this project, whenever the artist called McCabe would come to meet him at The Factory, an opening, a party, a coffee shop or any place where Warhol would decide that he wanted to be accompanied by the photographer and his camera.

In the end, these images were never published, perhaps because they revealed more than the increasingly-famous Warhol was willing to share with the public.

McCabe joins us to discuss an exhibition of his work at the Broderick Fine Art Gallery at Ruby's Hotel in Freehold, New York.

Earl Dotter

Renowned labor photojournalist, Earl Dotter, has photographed workers in various occupations for the last 50 years. His photos capture the humanity and nature of work in the US. He has documented the lives of coal mine workers in Appalachia, farmworkers, fishermen, nurses, 9-11 rescue workers, and some of the major events of the labor movement in U.S. history.

The exhibit "Life's Work: A Fifty Year Photographic Chronicle of Working in the U.S.A." will be shown at the LOB Concourse Level in the Legislative Office Building in Albany, New York from April 22 through the 26. 

We are joined by Earl Dotter, Northeast NY Coalition for Occupational Safety and Health Director, Matt London, and Outreach and Education Coordinator Rossana Coto-Batres. 

As Chief Official White House Photographer, Pete Souza spent more time alongside President Barack Obama than almost anyone else. His years photographing the President gave him an intimate behind-the-scenes view of the unique gravity of the Office of the Presidency--and the tremendous responsibility that comes with it.

Now, as a concerned citizen observing the Trump administration, he is standing up and speaking out. "Shade" is a portrait in Presidential contrasts, telling the tale of the Obama and Trump administrations through a series of visual juxtapositions.

Marc Perrusquia is a journalist for The Commercial Appeal, the daily newspaper in Memphis, Tennessee, where he has worked the past twenty-nine years.

Renowned photographer Ernest Withers captured some of the most stunning moments of the civil rights era, from the age-defining snapshot of Dr. Martin Luther King, Jr., riding one of the first integrated buses in Montgomery, to the haunting photo of Emmett Till’s great-uncle pointing an accusing finger at his nephew’s killers. He was trusted and beloved by King’s inner circle, and had a front row seat to history but few people know that Withers was also an informant for the FBI.

William Wegman's whimsical photographs of his Weimaraner dogs have been celebrated in the art world and enjoyed by pet lovers for decades.

In the book William Wegman: Being Human, renowned photography curator William A. Ewing presents more than 300 images from the artist's personal archive, unearthing previously unseen gems alongside the iconic images that have made Wegman - along with dressed-up dogs Man Ray, Fay Ray, and others - beloved worldwide.

William Wegman joins us.

According to our next guest, without volunteers, our nation’s animal shelter system simply would not exist. Volunteers speak for those that cannot speak, pick up the pieces for abandoned animals that have been let down by previous owners or unfortunate circumstances, and do whatever it takes to heal the deepest of wounds.

In his book Finding Shelter, award-winning photographer Jesse Freidin shows the softer side of this story. He witnessed firsthand how many of the volunteers were able to mend their own emotional hurts with the love the shelter animals gave back to them, and how the power of these relationships transforms shelters into places where humans and animals can heal together.

In Finding Shelter, Freidin sparks a new discussion about animal rescue and what it feels like to truly love an animal and we welcome him to the show this morning.

Capital region resident Patrick Harbron began his career photographing the luminaries of rock and roll. Rock and Roll Icons: Photographs by Patrick Harbron is an exhibition at the Albany Institute of History & Art taken from Harbron’s body of concert and portrait photography of influential musicians and groups of the 1970’s and 1980’s, captured at pivotal moments in their careers.

The exhibition features many photographs that have never been published or exhibited. Harbron photographed artists such as Blondie, Rush, Stevie Ray Vaughan, The Police, Bruce Springsteen, Madonna and Elvis Costello early in their careers. He followed these artists to prominence and others that were already well known including The Rolling Stones, Pink Floyd, Led Zeppelin, Van Halen, Eric Clapton, David Bowie, Queen, The Who, Genesis, KISS, U2, Aerosmith, and Prince.

The exhibition will include Harbron’s collection of posters and ephemera gathered throughout his career along with guitars borrowed from the Rock and Roll Hall of Fame. The exhibit runs from November 5th through February 12th. 

  Hudson Valley Ruins is a photography and architecture exhibition at The New York State Museum based on the work of Robert Yasinsac and Thomas Rinaldi.

Their 2006 book, Hudson Valley Ruins: Forgotten Landmarks of an American Landscape, studies the region's forgotten cultural treasures. In addition to great river estates, the book profiles sites more meaningful to everyday life in the Valley: churches and hotels, commercial and civic buildings, mills and train stations.

The show is on display at The New York State Museum through December 31st and this Saturday the artists will be on hand for a guided tour and book signing. 

  The regional premiere of the Donald Margulies play Time Stands Still opens tonight and runs through October 15th at the Curtain Call Theater in Latham, NY.  

After barely surviving a bomb blast in Iraq, photojournalist Sarah Goodwin finds herself caught in a tug of war between her career and the quiet of domestic life.

Returning home into the care of her long-time lover, James, Sarah is caught off-guard by James’ desire for family and by the simple domestic life pursued by Richard, her editor, and his much younger girlfriend, Mandy. Two of the cast-members join us this morning – Amy Lane and Tom Templeton. 

  Richard Michelson has had a wonderful friendship with actor and artist Leonard Nimoy. After Nimoy’s passing, Michelson has written a new picture book, Fascinating: The Life of Leonard Nimoy.

He is also presenting a beautiful exhibit: UNSEEN: Fifty never before exhibited photographs by Leonard Nimoy which is now open and runs through October 25th.

Michelson will be speaking in Great Barrington on September 9th from 10:30 to noon presented by The Jewish Federation of the Berkshires and will have a publication party. Later that night will be the official opening of UNSEEN at the R. Michelson Galleries in Northampton, MA.

To celebrate the September 8th - 50th anniversary of the first Trek episode – we welcome Richard Michelson to The Roundtable.

Gregory Crewdson

  Gregory Crewdson will discuss the making of his most recent body of work in a conversation with acclaimed author Rick Moody at The Mahaiwe on Monday, August 15th at 7pm.

The evening will include the first ever projected slideshow presentation of Cathedral of the Pines in its entirety, set to Yo La Tengo's "Night Falls on Hoboken," remixed specially for this event by Grammy-winning producer/engineer Drew Brown.

Cathedral of the Pines (2013–14) was made during three productions in and around the rural town of Becket, Massachusetts. The work premiered at Gagosian Gallery in New York earlier this year, and will be seen for the first time in Europe, concurrently in Brussels and Paris in September.

Rick Moody is the author of six novels, three collections of stories, a memoir, and a collection of essays on music. His most recent publication is Hotels of North America, a novel. He writes regularly about music at The Rumpus, and writes the column "Rick Moody, Life Coach," for LitHub.

Art Photograph - The Barn by Gregory Crewdson
Gregory Crewdson

  Photographer Gregory Crewdson’s career has spanned three decades. His work has been exhibited widely in the United States and Europe and is included in many public collections, including The Museum of Modern Art, The Metropolitan Museum of Art, The Whitney Museum of American Art, The Brooklyn Museum, The Los Angeles County Museum and The San Francisco Museum of Modern Art.

Crewdson’s newest body of work entitled, Cathedral of the Pines, will premiere at Gagosian Gallery in New York City this Thursday - January 28th.

Comprised of 31 digital pigment prints, this series was made during three productions in and around the rural town of Becket, Massachusetts. 

  Lynsey Addario was just finding her way as a young photographer when September 11 changed the world. One of the few photojournalists with experience in Afghanistan, she got the call to return and cover the American invasion.

Addario finds a way to travel with a purpose. She photographs the Afghan people before and after the Taliban reign, the civilian casualties and misunderstood insurgents of the Iraq War, as well as the burned villages and countless dead in Darfur. She exposes a culture of violence against women in the Congo and tells the riveting story of her headline-making kidnapping by pro-Qaddafi forces in the Libyan civil war.

She writes about her experiences in her memoir, It's What I Do: A Photographer's Life of Love and War.

Marisa Scheinfeld

  Photographer Marisa Scheinfeld grew up in New York’s Catskills region, not far from its legendary resorts of the Borscht Belt, a name derived from the area’s popularity with Jews from the New York region who for years were not welcome at many other vacation spots.

For much of the 20th century the Borscht Belt was a thriving vacation destination, home to hundreds of hotels and motels, from famed high-end resorts such as Grossinger’s and the Concord to modest bungalow colonies. In its heyday, the area was known especially for its nightlife, with top comedians and other performers appearing regularly there.

By the time Scheinfeld was growing up there in the 1980s and ‘90s, however, economic and other factors had sent the region into rapid decline, leading many of the hotels and clubs to close. For the past five years, Scheinfeld has documented that decline through a series of evocative, sometimes ghostly large-scale images of dozens of empty hotels.

An exhibit of that work, Echoes from the Borscht Belt: Contemporary Photographs by Marisa Scheinfeld, is at the Yiddish Book Center’s Brechner Gallery.

    

Lionel Delevingne - author/photographer of To the Village Square: From Montague to Fukushima: 1975 – 2014 is a collection of photographs telling the story of citizens who spoke up against the nuclear power industry and who fought for years to stop construction or to close reactors in their backyards.

Through Lionel Delevingne’s record, readers can see the tragedies of the worst accident sites: Three Mile Island in the United States, Chernobyl in Russia, and Fukushima in Japan.

Lionel Delevingne is a photojournalist native of France, settled in the US since 1975, who has traveled and photographed throughout the world. He will be talking about and signing his new book: To the Village Square: From Montague to Fukushima: 1975-2014 on Wednesday, November 5 at 7:00 PM at the Odyssey Bookshop in South Hadley.

  The leading authority on digital photography, Tom Ang celebrates the greatest photographs – and photographers – of all time in his 30th book, Photography: The Definitive Visual History.

When Marie Colvin was killed in an attack in Syria in February 2012, the world mourned the loss of the greatest war correspondent of her generation.

Marie was known for her signature style, her black eye patch and the pearls gifted from Arafat, and her fearlessness in covering some of the world’s most dangerous conflicts. She died while reporting on the suffering of Syrian civilians,sacrificing her life with a cause she believed in- the need to witness the bear anonymous victims of war.

Telling her story for the first time is Paul Conroy, a British war photographer who had forged a close bond with Marie, and was with her when she died. His book is Under the Wire: Marie Colvin’s Final Assignment. It is a gripping and moving account of their friendship, and of their final assignment to one of the most hellish places on Earth.

  The new book Dorothea Lange: Grab a Hunk of Lightning is a volume that celebrates one of the 20th century’s most important photographers- led off by and authoritative biographical essay by Elizabeth Partridge, Lange’s goddaughter.