freedom

Black Theatre Troupe of Upstate NY presents “The Most Spectacularly Lamentable Trial of Miz Martha Washington” by James Ijames. The show will run at the Meader Little Theatre at Sage College June 7 through the 16. The production is directed by Patrick White.

A recently widowed Martha Washington lies helpless in her Mount Vernon bed, ravaged by illness and cared for by the very slaves that will be free the moment she dies. As she begins to slip away, she falls deep into a fever dream of terrifying theatricality that investigates everything from her family to her historical legacy.

Here to tell us more about the production are Black Theatre Troupe and this production are Black Theatre Troupe Artistic Director Jean-Remy Monnay and actors Lucy Breyer and Angelique Powell who play Martha Washington and Doll, respectively.

Great Barrington Historical Society's 2019 lecture at St. James Place In Great Barrington, Massachusetts is: "Elizabeth Freeman’s Case for Freedom: The End of Slavery in Massachusetts and the Black Berkshire Community in Post-Colonial America." The talk by Dr. David Levinson is scheduled for May 11.

Levinson is a cultural anthropologist and former vice-president at Yale University's Human Relations Area Files, an anthropological think-tank. He is co-author of “One Minute a Free Woman: Elizabeth Freeman and the Struggle for Freedom.”

Shoshana Zuboff is the Charles Edward Wilson Professor emerita, Harvard Business School. She is the author of In "The Age of the Smart Machine: the Future of Work and Power" and "The Support Economy: Why Corporations Are Failing Individuals and the Next Episode of Capitalism."

In her new book, "The Age of Surveillance Capitalism: The Fight for a Human Future at the New Frontier of Power," she brings to life the consequences of surveillance capitalism as it advances from Silicon Valley into every economic sector. Vast wealth and power are accumulated in ominous new "behavioral futures markets," where predictions about our behavior are bought and sold, and the production of goods and services is subordinated to a new "means of behavioral modification."

Zuboff's analysis lays bare the threats to twenty-first century society: a controlled "hive" of total connection that seduces with promises of total certainty for maximum profit; at the expense of democracy, freedom, and our human future. 

Book Cover - Separate: The Story of Plessy v. Ferguson, and America's Journey from Slavery to Segregation

Steve Luxenberg is the author of "Separate: The Story of Plessy v. Ferguson, and America's Journey from Slavery to Segregation" and the critically acclaimed "Annie’s Ghosts: A Journey into a Family Secret." During his thirty years as a Washington Post senior editor, he has overseen reporting that has earned numerous national honors, including two Pulitzer Prizes.

Plessy v. Ferguson, the Supreme Court case synonymous with “separate but equal,” created remarkably little stir when the justices announced their near-unanimous decision on May 18, 1896. Yet it is one of the most compelling and dramatic stories of the nineteenth century, whose outcome embraced and protected segregation, and whose reverberations are still felt into the twenty-first. "Separate" spans a striking range of characters and landscapes, bound together by the defining issue of their time and ours: race and equality.

Born and raised in Jackson, Mississippi, Kiese Laymon, Ottilie Schillig Professor of English and Creative Writing at the University of Mississippi, is the author of the novel "Long Division" and a collection of essays, "How to Slowly Kill Yourself and Others in America."

In his new book, "Heavy: An American Memoir," he writes eloquently and honestly about growing up a hard-headed black son to a complicated and brilliant black mother in Jackson, Mississippi. From his early experiences of sexual violence, to his suspension from college, to his trek to New York as a young college professor, Laymon charts his complex relationship with his mother, grandmother, anorexia, obesity, sex, writing, and ultimately gambling.

By attempting to name secrets and lies he and his mother spent a lifetime avoiding, Laymon asks himself, his mother, his nation, and us to confront the terrifying possibility that few in this nation actually know how to responsibly love, and even fewer want to live under the weight of actually becoming free.

The 17th Annual Underground Railroad History Project’s public convention is taking place in Albany, NY today through Sunday.  LibertyCon 2018 is entitled “Embracing Equity in a Global Society.”

The conference features workshops, exhibits, vendors, art, discussions and presentations.

Tonight’s opening speakers are Thomas DeWolf and Sharon Morgan – co-authors of “Gather at the Table: The Healing Journey of a Daughter of Slavery and a Son of the Slave Trade” – they join us along with Mary Liz Stewart, Co-founder and Executive Director of Underground Railroad History Project.

Sarah S. Kilborne
Jane O’Connor

  The Lavender Blues is a showcase of queer music before World War II. It is music history. It is queer history. It is women's history. It is great entertainment.

With The Lavender Blues, modern cabaret performer Sarah Kilborne brings to light for the first time the quiet, yet powerful emergence between the world wars of songs that spoke about what it was like to be gay or "in the life."

From such legends as Ma Rainey, Bessie Smith, Gladys Bentley and Josephine Baker, Kilborne performs songs - written almost a century ago - that describe what it is like to be non-binary. The themes in the music are as emblematic of yesterday as they are relevant today, addressing issues of masculinity, femininity, same-sex love, cross-dressing, the desire for freedom from prejudice and more.

Sarah Kilborne is bringing the show to The Linda in Albany, NY on Friday night.

Stephen Gottlieb: Preserving Republican Government

Feb 2, 2016

Americans began to think about preserving and protecting their form of government even before the Constitution was signed.

James Green is a celebrated labor historian and author of the book Death in the Haymarket. His new book is The Devil is Here in These Hills, a chronicle of West Virginia’s coal miners and their fight for unionization and civil rights. The book is particularly relevant today as the arduous battle for the rights of West Virginia miners rages on. 

Herbert London: Freedom As A Natural Condition?

Oct 16, 2013

It has been argued in several of the intellectual journals in the West, that the aspiration for freedom is a universal goal, that most societies admire the freedoms we enjoy and wish to emulate us. As I see it, this proposition is one of the more pernicious illusions we entertain.

    Barry Siegel joins us to talk about his new book: Manifest Injustice: The True Story of a Convicted Murderer and the Lawyers Who Fought for His Freedom.

In the book, Siegel chronicles the dramatic story of an Arizona man named Bill Macumber who, until his unexpected release from prison last November, had spent more than half his life behind bars.

Today we’re talking freedom – which, according to the dictionary, can mean exemption from external control, the power to determine action without restraint, or national independence.

That leads us to Independence Day, celebrated tomorrow on the Fourth of July, a day when we, as Americans, are supposed to celebrate our freedom as afforded by our fore fathers with the signing of the Declaration of Independence in 1776.