education | WAMC

education

  Associate Head of the Albany Academy for Girls, Wendy Muhlfelder, and Kim Taylor, Albany Academy Alum, speak with Alan Chartock.

Kim Taylor will back up her husband, James, at a benefit concert for the school’s 200th anniversary this Saturday, May 17th.

NEA President On National Teachers Day

May 6, 2014
NEA

At one point or another, we all had that teacher who demanded more and saw something in us that we could not, or would not see, in ourselves. Good enough wasn’t good enough, and the papers were often handed back covered in red ink. It may have been tough then, but that teacher may welcome your thanks today for setting a higher bar. Today is National Teachers Day, a time to look at the profession and the challenges faced by today’s teachers. Dennis Van Roekel is the president of the 3 million-member National Education Association, who hopes teachers will hear from former students today.

WAMC/Pat Bradley

At least 300 teachers and education advocates picketed outside the venue of an education reform retreat in Lake Placid Sunday. They are upset that no educators were participating in the upscale Camp Philos organized by a group backed by Wall Street hedge fund managers with a goal of privatizing education.

New York state education officials have adopted a safety net for teacher candidates who fail a newly required "bar exam."

The Board of Regents on Tuesday agreed to let student teachers who fail this year or next use a passing score on a previous test as proof they're ready to teach.

Before the Regents vote, any teacher graduating college after May 1 was going to have to pass the bar exam — called the edTPA  — to be certified. The test requires video and written proof of a would-be teacher's skills.

Office of New York Governor Andrew Cuomo

New York Governor Andrew Cuomo and the legislature approved a plan in the state budget to encourage local governments and schools to merge and share services over the next few years in an attempt to lower property taxes.  But according to a study by school administrators, attempts at school district mergers in recent years have failed, partly because the public doesn’t want them.

Karen Magee: Let’s Hit The Re-set Button

Apr 21, 2014

A brief introduction is in order.

My name is Karen Magee. I’m an elementary school teacher from Harrison, and mom to three great kids — the youngest in high school.  My grandmother, Helen, was a member of the International Ladies Garment Workers … and she always told me that a woman’s place is in her union.  Earlier this month, when I became the first woman elected president of New York State United Teachers, I knew that she would be proud.

  America’s higher education system is failing its students. In the space of a generation, we have gone from being the best-educated society in the world to one surpassed by eleven other nations in college graduation rates.

Higher education is evolving into a caste system with separate and unequal tiers that take in students from different socio-economic backgrounds and leave them more unequal than when they first enrolled.

In Degrees of Inequality, acclaimed political scientist Suzanne Mettler explains why the system has gone so horribly wrong and why the American Dream is increasingly out of reach for so many.

CFES College for Every Student

Education experts from across the globe will gather in the Adirondack hamlet of Essex later this week to discuss how to get more low-income students to graduate from college.

vimeo

Westchester County Executive Rob Astorino says his three school-aged children won't be participating in new testing standards as part of the Common Core exams starting this week. The Republican candidate for governor of New York released a video statement on his website Monday explaining he made the decision along with his wife Sheila, a special education teacher.

Common Core is being implemented in schools across the country, but it has been heavily criticized by many parents and educators.

Children at school on a computer
Lucelia Ribeiro/Flickr

A new report reveals New York State's public schools are the most segregated in the nation.

The report released Wednesday by the Civil Rights Project at the University of California at Los Angeles used U.S. Department of Education statistics: it noted increasing segregation in the Buffalo, Rochester, Syracuse, Albany and New York City metro areas.   It found many black and Latino students attend schools with virtually no white classmates throughout New York.

  This week in our Ideas Matter segment - we’ll learn about Mass Humanities’ Traveling Humanities Seminar to Ghana.

In 1957 Ghana became the first country in sub-Saharan Africa to achieve political independence and according to World Bank figures, Ghana is experiencing one of the fastest rates of economic growth in the world. While these credentials inspire enthusiasm both in and about the country, in the face of inefficient financial management by successive governments, high budget deficits, an electoral system in need of reform, high unemployment, and low education results per investment, the critics are questioning if free and fair elections alone defines Ghana as a democracy. The Mass Humanities Traveling Humanities Seminar looks at Ghana's emerging democracy.

Office of New York Governor Andrew Cuomo

Education funding advocates, including actress Cynthia Nixon, made a last minute pitch for extra money for schools in the state budget. Meanwhile, a new poll finds many New Yorkers think the quality of education in the state is deteriorating.

   This morning in our Ideas Matter segment, we spotlight the Connecticut Humanities Council and learn about History Day In Connecticut.

CT History Day is part of the National History Day which helps students understand how to "do" history and why our history is important.

The program reaches hundreds of schools and thousands of children. It's a way of investing in a future audience for history and the humanities and helps CT students connect directly with the history of their country and their state.

flickr.com

The budget being negotiated in Albany will establish not only how much state aid school districts will receive, but it also could affect the age many kids start going to school, when they begin standardized tests and even influence whether they go to public or private school.

Education issues are prominent this budget season in Albany. This includes the pre-kindergarten debate prompted by New York City Mayor Bill de Blasio and a tax credit advocated this week by Cardinal Timothy Dolan that could boost Catholic school attendance.

Over the last several weeks, the media has been filled with news of the revised SAT to be implemented in the spring of 2016 by the College Board. Championed by the relatively new President of the College Board, David Coleman, this newly-conceived SAT has received praise as well as criticism in terms of content, design and potential impact on college admissions.

 Each season, more than 300 talented musicians, ages 9-18, from the greater Capital Region of New York and western New England, enjoy outstanding educational and performance opportunities as members in one or more of the Empire State Youth Orchestra’s two full orchestras, wind orchestra, string ensemble, two jazz ensembles, and three percussion ensembles.

This Sunday, ESYO will present a concert of Russian music at Troy Savings Bank Music Hall and on April 4th they will join the Cathedral of All Saints in Albany to produce/perform a concert to benefit Northern Rivers.

Here to tell us more are ESYO’s new Executive Director, Becky Carlos and Music Director, Helen Cha-Pyo.

Karen DeWitt

New York State Assembly Democrats say there should be more money for schools and the environment, and major changes to Governor Andrew Cuomo’s plan to freeze property taxes. It’s all part of a one-house budget resolution, the first step in reaching agreement on a final spending plan by the end of March.

Governor Cuomo and New York City Mayor Bill de Blasio spoke at dueling rallies on education at the State Capitol that highlighted the two politicians’ differences over education issues.   

A rally to promote New York City Mayor Bill de Blasio’s plan for universal pre kindergarten  had been planned for weeks. The mayor spoke to around 1500 union members, urging them to put the pressure on state lawmakers to approve in the state budget the mayor’s plan to provide the classes for thousands of four year olds starting in September.

Cuomo Addresses Charter School Rally In Albany

Mar 4, 2014

New York Governor Andrew Cuomo spoke at a rally supporting charter schools on Tuesday in Albany. This video was distributed by the administration.

De Blasio Speaks At Ed Rally In Albany

Mar 4, 2014

New York City Mayor Bill de Blasio addressed an education rally Tuesday at the state capitol in Albany.

There’s been much angst expressed by parents of America’s children and youth, of late, about the rapid erosion of funds and services, to provide education needed to prepare them for appropriate and gainfully competitive adulthood.  There’s also been a mounting volume of critical carping and castigation by those in government, responsible for providing the funds necessary to achieve adequate levels of education and warnings of dire consequence, from those invested with the onus to plan and produce educational services at superior levels of educational accomplishment, from the President and throughout his executive departments.

    Amy Chua and Jed Rubenfeld join us to discuss their controversial book of The Triple Package: How Three Unlikely Traits Explain the Rise and Fall of Cultural Groups in America

Why do some groups rise? Drawing on groundbreaking original research and startling statistics, The Triple Package uncovers the secret to their success. A superiority complex, insecurity, impulse control—these are the elements of the Triple Package, the rare and potent cultural constellation that drives disproportionate group success.

Lucas Willard / WAMC

At a public meeting hosted by EDC Warren County at Crandall Library in Glens Falls, State Senator Betty Little and Assemblyman Dan Stec, both Republicans, answered questions and offered their thoughts on what is included — and what is not included — in Governor Cuomo’s budget proposal, and other matters facing lawmakers this year.

While the discussion covered topics ranging from infrastructure to the SAFE Act, the majority of the conversation focused on education.

The Vermont House and Senate education committees heard an overview of federal education policy from Vermont Senator Bernie Sanders at the Statehouse Wednesday afternoon.

Don Hankins/Flickr

New York education officials are postponing plans for a statewide student database until concerns about privacy and security have been addressed.

The state had planned to transfer students' grades, test scores and attendance records to Atlanta-based service provider InBloom this year. But opponents ranging from parents to state legislative leaders raised concerns about storing personal student data on servers in the so-called cloud, accessed through the Internet.

National Council on Teacher Equality

A new report from a national advocacy group gives New York improved grades for policies that support effective teaching.

The Washington, D.C.-based National Council on Teacher Quality has released its seventh annual State Teacher Policy Yearbook, which includes a 360-degree analysis of every state law, rule and regulation that shapes the effectiveness of the teaching profession in New York.

      We are very happy to continue our weekly feature on the RT, entitled – Ideas Matter: Checking in with the Public Humanities. It is our chance to check in with the Humanities Councils throughout our 7-State area to discuss important ideas and why they do indeed matter. This morning we spotlight Hartford Heritage Project and place-based education with the Connecticut Humanities Council.

Joining us is Dr. Jeffrey Partridge, Chair of the Humanities Department at Captital Community College, in Hartford CT.

    Based on author Barbara Diane Barry’s popular course Art for Self-Discovery and supported by research in psychology and the science of brain function her book: Painting Your Way Out of a Corner guides readers through the process of overcoming blocks and expressing themselves freely in painting.

Through a series of exercises that emphasize improvisation and risk-taking, readers will learn how to quiet their inner critics and strengthen their creativity. The more we learn to play and accept whatever appears on the page, the more we are able to try new things in life.

Barbara Diane Barry is an artist and art teacher in New York City. Under the educational outreach program at Symphony Space, she teaches in public schools throughout NYC's five boroughs and gives tours in the city’s finest museums.

    David Menasche lived for his work as a high school English teacher. When a six-year battle with brain cancer ultimately stole David’s vision, memory, mobility, and—most tragically of all—his ability to continue teaching, he was devastated by the thought that he would no longer have the chance to impact his students’ lives each day.

Jared Benedict

A new bill introduced in the New York State Assembly will create funding to include Pre-K students as part of transportation aid that is received by school districts for K-12 students.

Legislation introduced  by 109th district Assemblywoman Pat Fahy would bring parity for Pre-K transportation by providing state aid to public school districts as is now provided for K-12 education.

Pages