computer | WAMC

computer

Doreen Dodgen-Magee, PsyD, is a psychologist with over twenty-five years of experience working with individuals and groups in Portland, Oregon. Her main passion is engaging people about how the new digital landscape is shaping humanity.

In her new book, "Deviced!: Balancing Life and Technology in a Digital World," Dodgen-Magee uses personal stories, cutting edge research, and anecdotes from youth, parents, and professionals to highlights the brain changes that result from excessive technology use and offers an approach to the digital world that enables more informed and lasting change and a healthier long-term perspective.

Jesse Feiler joins us this morning to talk about changing and updating devices and acquiring the correct devices for your tasks.  

We’re managing more data than ever before and moving it around all the time. We need lots of compatible apps and data formats. The more flexible your tools, the more you can do with limited hardware resources.

Jesse Feiler helps people and organizations get to know and use new technologies. Projects have included building the page caching module for the Prodigy Web Browser for Mac in the very early days of the Web, location-based apps for iPhone and iOS, as well as books and classes on new technologies. His latest book is “Implementing iOS and macOS Documents with the Files App: Managing Files and ensuring compatibility.”

In this new portrait of Apple’s current CEO, "Tim Cook: The Genius Who Took Apple to the Next Level," New York Times bestselling author Leander Kahney has written the first-ever biography of Tim Cook and tells the story of how one man attempted to replace someone irreplaceable.

Based on interviews with Cook’s colleagues, Kahney chronicles the success of a post-Steve Jobs Apple including how Cook led the company to its historic trillion-dollar valuation.

Leander Kahney is an Apple expert, Cult of Mac.com Editor, and bestselling author of "Inside Steve’s Brain."

You use software nearly every instant you’re awake. It powers everything from social media, video games, and email to credit card fraud monitoring, smart home systems, and the brakes in your car. All of this software is written by computer programmers, and through their work, coders have become the most quietly influential people on the planet. If we want to understand how today’s world works, we ought to understand something about these digital architects.

In "Coders: The Making of a New Tribe and the Remaking of the World," tech journalist Clive Thompson draws on his access to today’s tech world to dive into the enigmatic world of coding and examine the consequences of the “programmer mentality.”

To join in on the conversation, we welcome our tech guru, app developer and author Jesse Feiler.

Roger McNamee is former mentor to Facebook CEO Mark Zuckerberg and then reluctantly became a critic of the way big tech companies like Facebook and Google are abusing their users’ trust.

His new book is: “Zucked: Waking Up to the Facebook Catastrophe.”

Artwork for book "Broad Band"
clairelevans.com

The history of technology you probably know is one of men and machines, garages and riches, alpha nerds and “brogrammers.” But female visionaries have always been at the vanguard of technology and innovation.

In fact, women turn up at the very beginning of every important wave in technology. They may have been hidden in plain sight, their inventions and contributions touching our lives in ways we don't even realize, but they have always been part of the story.

VICE reporter and YACHT lead singer Claire Evans gives these female heroes their due in her new book: "Broad Band: The Untold Story of the Women Who Made the Internet."

Children of the New World introduces readers to a near-future world of social media implants, memory manufacturers, dangerously immersive virtual reality games, and alarmingly intuitive robots. Many of these characters live in a utopian future of instant connection and technological gratification that belies an unbridgeable human distance, while others inhabit a post-collapse landscape made primitive by disaster, which they must work to rebuild as we once did millennia ago.

Alexander Wesinstein is the director of the Martha’s Vineyard Institute of Creative Writing. He is the recipient of a Sustainable Arts Foundation Award, and his stories have received the Lamar York, Gail Crump, and New Millennium Prizes, have been nominated for Pushcart Prizes, and appear in the anthology New Stories from the Midwest. He is an associate professor of creative writing at Siena Heights University and leads fiction workshops in the United States and Europe.

  There's a lot of interest in teaching people how to write code. This interest encompasses lots of issues including increasing diversity among coders as well as moving beyond the business-oriented world of coding to other worlds such as arts and sciences. Are coding languages becoming just another way of communicating? We'll talk about those issues.

There are several avenues of exploration and development to talk about, and the diversity and organization (or lack thereof) in the development communities mean that there are lots of choices to make.

And, not to be left out, is this all about sixth-graders? Is there any hope for older folks (including many of the folk who are coding and developing the vast amount of software that we all rely on every day).

And what does it mean when people say that millennials are the first digital native generation?

Our tech guru, Jesse Feiler, joins us. 

  The New York Times has called our next guest - a “rock star” in the computer world.”

David Gelernter is an expert in the fields of parallel computing, “mirror worlds,” artificial intelligence, and cognitive thinking. His new book is The Tides of Mind, a revolutionary explanation of the phenomenon of human consciousness. In the book, he reminds us that no computer can ever replicate the Human Mind,

Gelernter will be in our region tomorrow for a pair of NYS Writer’s Institute events – a 4:15 Seminar and an 8PM reading – both at the Performing Arts Center on the Uptown Campus at the University at Albany in the Recital Hall.

He is the author of eight books including The Muse in the Machine, about teaching computers to experience emotion and write poetry and Mirror Worlds, a work that predicted the rise of the Internet. In1993 Gelernter was a victim of a mail bomb sent by the “Unabomber,” an experience he recounts in his book; Drawing Life: Surviving the Unabomber.

  The Innovators is Walter Isaacson’s revealing story of the people who created the computer and the Internet. It is destined to be the standard history of the digital revolution and an indispensable guide to how innovation really happens.

What were the talents that allowed certain inventors and entrepreneurs to turn their visionary ideas into disruptive realities? What led to their creative leaps? Why did some succeed and others fail?

Mayor Jerry Jennings has announced a round of technological leaps for the city of Albany. It's a triple dose of innovation - first, a redesigned, more user-friendly city website... second, the city rolls out its second major app...  and third, a new information czar.

Jesse Feiler - Big Data

Feb 19, 2013

  This morning we discuss called something called: Big Data. That's the term for the massive databases that are coming into vogue and raising privacy issues. Our tech guru, Jesse Feiler joins us to explain.

Jesse is a developer, consultant, and author specializing in iOS, FileMaker databases, and technologies for small businesses, nonprofits, and municipal governments. His most recent books are iWork for Dummies, Sams Teach Yourself Core Data in 24 Hours, and its companion Objective-C in 24 Hours.

His app, Minutes Machine for iPad, is available on the App Store. It helps nonprofits, homeowner associations, and small businesses manage meetings and generate minutes in real-time. 

Jesse Feiler - Software

Mar 28, 2012

Ray Graf welcomes Jesse Feiler back to Studio A. This month Jesse speaks about software updates, competitiveness, and how programmers think about both.