Cary Institute of Ecosystem Studies

WAMC, Allison Dunne

A New York state Senator was in Millbrook today to present a check to the Cary Institute of Ecosystem Studies in support of a project aimed at Lyme disease prevention.

Tick
Photo by Scott Bauer (USDA ARS)

In the final hours of New York’s legislative session, funding was secured to help combat Lyme and tick-borne diseases. But it’s less than initially requested.

The Cary Institute of Ecosystem Studies has been working with IBM to model disease systems. It’s the first such collaboration for both, to identify primate species with the potential to spread the Zika virus in the Americas. WAMC’s Hudson Valley Bureau Chief Allison Dunne has more on the partnership’s first published study.

WAMC, Allison Dunne

With New York state budget negotiations ratcheting up in the final days, myriad groups are advocating for their funding needs — including advocates who want money for fighting Lyme disease.

Courtesy of Cary Institute of Ecosystem Studies

Using less road salt would help mitigate damaging effects on the environment, and on municipal and state budgets. So says a new report from the Cary Institute of Ecosystem Studies, which recommends strategies for reining in the overuse of road salt. WAMC’s Hudson Valley Bureau Chief Allison Dunne spoke with the report’s lead author.

Study Shows Common Mosquito Repellent Kills Predator

Nov 20, 2018
Courtesy of Dr. John Clare

A recent study shows that a common mosquito repellent is lethal to larval salamanders. It’s an ironic twist given that larval salamanders serve as a check on these nuisance insects. And the implications go even further. WAMC’s Hudson Valley Bureau Chief Allison Dunne spoke with Emma Rosi, a freshwater ecologist at the Cary Institute of Ecosystem Studies in Millbrook, New York. Rosi also is co-author of the study on these repellents. She begins with why she and her co-authors embarked upon the report.

Courtesy of the Cary Institute of Ecosystem Studies

Forest soils are absorbing less methane. And a recent study says this could, in part, explain rising atmospheric levels of the greenhouse gas. WAMC’s Hudson Valley Bureau Chief Allison Dunne spoke with Peter Groffman, co-author of the study and senior research fellow at the Cary Institute of Ecosystem Studies.

Courtesy of the NYS Department of Health

Six New York state senators are calling on the state Health Department to act aggressively to stop the spread of the longhorned tick. The species was discovered for the first time in New York earlier this month in Westchester County. A health department official says efforts have already been ramped up.

With tick season upon us, there is a focus on outdoor prevention. But behind the scenes, scientists and doctors continue their work on treating and preventing Lyme and other tick-borne diseases. The Cary Institute of Ecosystem Studies recently co-hosted a panel discussion on the subject, where experts talked about the ongoing research.

Lyme Disease Panel Yields Updates

Jun 18, 2018
WAMC, Allison Dunne

As the summer season sets in, the Northeast is on alert for ticks. The Cary Institute of Ecosystem Studies recently co-hosted a panel discussion on Lyme and other tick-borne diseases.

Courtesy of Cary Institute of Ecosystem Studies

As the sight of trucks and plows on icy roads becomes a winter memory, a study from the Cary Institute of Ecosystem Studies reveals the impact of road salt on private drinking water wells. The report focused on a town in Dutchess County.

Courtesy of Erinn Richmond

Wastewater treatment plants are not designed to remove the chemicals found in pharmaceuticals and personal care products. Instead, such chemicals enter waterways where their effects on aquatic ecosystems are largely unknown. A new study looks at how these compounds disrupt such ecosystems. WAMC’s Hudson Valley Bureau Chief Allison Dunne spoke with Emma Rosi, an aquatic ecologist at the Cary Institute of Ecosystem Studies in Millbrook, New York. She is co-author of the new study on the topic.

Tick
Photo by Scott Bauer (USDA ARS)

Two New York state senators released a report last week aimed at combating the spread of Lyme and tick-borne diseases. The report, which follows a public hearing in August, contains a number of recommendations. A Hudson Valley scientist who studies Lyme disease commended the report, but has some suggestions for improving it.

WAMC

New York’s Eric Schneiderman and 10 other attorneys general have sent a letter to U.S. Senate leaders. The letter urges opposition to a bill that would eliminate states’ authority to protect waterways from ships’ polluted discharges, making it easier for non-native species to invade the Hudson River and Great Lakes.

Courtesy of the Cary Institute of Ecosystem Studies

New research shows there is a blind spot when it comes to achieving sustainability goals. A freshwater ecologist at the Millbrook-based Cary Institute of Ecosystem Studies co-authored a paper on global trends in synthetic chemical pollution. WAMC’s Hudson Valley Bureau Chief Allison Dunne spoke with Emma Rosi about her research and why she’s sounding the alarm bell.

A former president of the Cary Institute of Ecosystem Studies in Dutchess County is one of 375 members of the National Academy of Sciences who has signed an open letter to draw attention to the perils of climate change. WAMC’s Hudson Valley Bureau Chief Allison Dunne spoke with Dr. William Schlesinger about why he thinks the letter is important.

Brittany Hanrahan

A study believed to be the first of its kind explores the ecological consequences of amphetamines in streams. It was co-authored by a scientist in the Hudson Valley.

Courtesy of Cary Institute of Ecosystem Studies

A forest ecologist from the Cary Institute of Ecosystem Studies in Dutchess County is the lead author of a paper about imported forest pests. Cary Institute and Harvard Forest led a team of scientists for the research. WAMC’s Hudson Valley Bureau Chief Allison Dunne spoke with Cary Institute Senior Scientist Dr. Gary Lovett about the report’s findings.

Cary Institute of Ecosystem Studies

May is Lyme Disease Awareness month, but at least one area scientist is advocating for moving the campaign to April, to get ahead of tick emergence. Meanwhile, Dutchess County — at the epicenter of the disease —  is aiming to educate the public in a different way this year.

Dr. Richard Ostfeld is a disease ecologist at the Millbrook-based Cary Institute of Ecosystem Studies. He says if we want to get a leg up on tick-borne illness we need to become vigilant earlier in the season.

Study Says Disease-Carrying Ticks Are Emerging Earlier

Feb 18, 2015
Courtesy of Cary Institute of Ecosystem Studies/Sam Cillo

A new study shows that ticks carrying Lyme disease are emerging earlier and spreading into new geographic regions.

Cary Institute of Ecosystem Studies

A new study in New York reveals that ticks are more likely to be infected with several pathogens, not just the bacterium that causes Lyme disease. The ticks for the study were collected from Dutchess County. 

People who are bitten by a blacklegged tick could be at higher risk of more than one infection. Felicia Keesing is a biology professor at Dutchess County-based Bard College and co-author of a new study.

Tick
Photo by Scott Bauer (USDA ARS)

An ecological research center in the Hudson Valley has received federal funding for a study on Lyme disease.

Cary Institute Names New President

Apr 30, 2014
Cary Institute of Ecosystem Studies

A preeminent ecological research center in the Hudson Valley has a new president.

WAMC/Allison Dunne

A pedestrian bridge in New York has a new sign unveiled this week featuring real-time data about the Hudson River. Officials say the information will provide some useful facts to visitors while scientists monitor the river’s changing conditions.

Doug Tone, flickr

A new study shows streams and rivers up and down the East Coast are threatened by a legacy of acid rain and the impact of human activities. WAMC’s Hudson Valley Bureau Chief Allison Dunne spoke with one of the study’s authors.

Dr. Gene Likens, co-discoverer of acid rain in North America some 50 years ago, says the study is the first of its kind. Researchers looked at long-term alkalinity trends in 97 streams and rivers from Florida to New Hampshire, and found alkalinity has increased.

Tick
Photo by Scott Bauer (USDA ARS)

A new study from the Centers for Disease Control and Prevention looks at whether spraying yards with pesticides reduces the risk of contracting a tick-borne disease. In New York, the study focused on Dutchess County.

Study Finds Ticks Linked To Encephalitis In NYS

Jul 16, 2013
Courtesy of Cary Institute for Ecosystem Studies

A recent study shows a link between a certain type of tick and a rare illness. The report shows the virus is on the rise in parts of the Hudson Valley and has spread to the Capital District. A disease ecologist in Dutchess County says there are more ticks carrying the virus on one side of the Hudson River versus the other.

Dr. Richard Ostfeld is a disease ecologist at the Cary Institute of Ecosystem Studies in Millbrook. He is one of the authors of a paper about ticks linked to encephalitis in New York State. Here’s why he and other scientists undertook the study.

A new paper published by scientists in the Northeast finds that long-term studies at the local scale are needed to accurately predict and manage the effects of climate change.

A report has been published that assesses the accuracy of  scientific hypotheses that predict how invasive species will spread and affect ecosystems.