New York education | WAMC

New York education

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A new survey of New York public school officials details the fiscal impact of the COVID-19 pandemic and resulting cuts to aid on the state’s education system. 

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Monday was the first day back at school for many of New York’s kindergarten through 12th grade students, though some students will learn remotely. Health officials say they will monitor whether the in-person classes cause any outbreaks of COVID-19.

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Schools in New York are finalizing plans to partially reopen in a few weeks, and many colleges and universities have already begun classes. But those who work at the schools, including teachers and professors, say guidelines for when to wear masks need to be more comprehensive, to help prevent spread of the coronavirus.

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As school districts prepare to welcome back students for in-person teaching and remote learning in New York, the Mental Health Association in New York State is offering expanded resources for teachers, students, parents and guardians. 

Regents Chancellor Betty Rosa (center), Vice Chancellor Andrew Brown (left) and former NY Education Commissioner MaryEllen Elia
Karen DeWitt

The chancellor of New York’s Board of Regents is resigning to take over as interim commissioner of the state’s education department. 

New York Governor Andrew Cuomo
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New York Governor Andrew Cuomo says he will announce later this week on what terms that schools can reopen during the ongoing COVID-19 pandemic. But he put the responsibility for the details back on schools Monday, saying they need to better respond to the concerns of parents.

New York Governor Andrew Cuomo speaking March 25, 2020.
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New York Governor Andrew Cuomo says he’ll decide next week on whether schools can partially or fully reopen in September. Meanwhile, many school districts have been busy figuring out safe ways to re-open during the COVID-19 pandemic, and some have already made some preliminary decisions.  

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The New York State Education Department has released guidance on potentially reopening schools in the fall during the pandemic. 

Protestors gather outside the New York state Capitol May 1, 2020.
Karen DeWitt

Governor Andrew Cuomo announced Friday that all schools in New York will be closed until the end of the school year, and he raised questions about summer school, and even whether schools will reopen in the fall. 

NYSSBA's David Albert
NYSSBA

Education leaders were paying close attention to New York Governor Andrew Cuomo’s State of the State address. But, David Albert, the Director of Communications, Marketing and Research for the New York State School Boards Association, says public K through 12 education wasn’t a top item in the Democrat’s speech this year.

New School Year Brings New Safety Measures In NY

Sep 4, 2019
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As students return to classes, some new safety measures are in place in schools across New York. Tim Kremer, the executive director of the New York State School Boards Association, spoke with WAMC’s Brian Shields about a new “red flag law” and more.

New School Year Brings New School Bus Law In NY

Sep 3, 2019
School bus
Pat Bradley/WAMC

As the new school years begins, a new law in New York allows school buses to be equipped with cameras to provide evidence when a driver breaks the law by passing a stopped school bus that is picking up or dropping off students and has its lights flashing. David Christopher, the executive director of the New York Association for Pupil Transportation, says under the law that takes effect September 5, municipalities are responsible for the cost of the program. 

NY Voters Approve Vast Majority Of School Budgets

May 24, 2019
New York State School Boards Association Executive Director Tim Kremer
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New Yorkers went to the polls on Tuesday to decide school budgets and school board elections. The New York State School Boards Association says 98.4 percent of the school budgets were approved. 

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A judge has ruled that New York state overstepped its authority when it announced new guidelines for monitoring private schools, including religious schools.

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State education officials ordered the cancellation of computerized testing for New York’s third through eighth grade students on Wednesday, after a testing software glitch prevented some students from being able to complete, and in some cases, even begin the tests. But they say they will be able to restart the tests on Thursday.

New York State Education Commissioner MaryEllen Elia
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New York Education Commissioner Mary Ellen Elia says she’s not pleased with Governor Andrew Cuomo’s proposal to spend just half of the amount of new money on public schools that education experts in New York recommend. Elia spoke Wednesday at a joint legislative budget hearing at the state Capitol.

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The New York state Legislature has approved a measure that ends a mandate that teacher evaluations be based on the results of their students’ standardized tests. It’s another step to end a 10-year-old bitter fight between teachers, their unions and politicians, including, Democratic Governor Andrew Cuomo, over implementation of the controversial Common Core learning standards.

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The New York state Board of Regents recommends that an additional $2.1 billion be spent on schools next year, and that a 12-year-old court order to fully fund schools be phased in over the next three years. The proposal is being applauded by school funding advocacy groups.

New York State Education Commissioner MaryEllen Elia
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The New York state education department has announced it made an error in the distribution of some federal funding that favored the state’s charter schools over public schools.

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Teachers wouldn’t be evaluated based on their students’ standardized test scores any longer under a measure approved by the New York state Assembly. It’s a reversal of a controversial policy that helped lead to a widespread boycott of the third through eighth grade tests associated with the former Common Core program. But the measure faces an uncertain future in the state Senate.

NYS Assembly Speaker Carl Heastie speaks to reporters on Sheldon Silver's sentencing.
Karen Dewitt

Assembly Speaker Carl Heastie says the New York state Assembly will take up a bill Wednesday to decouple the results of standardized test scores from teacher evaluations.  There’s been growing support in the state legislature to reverse the controversial policy that would eventually have led to the test results being used to measure teacher performance.

How Education Fared In NY's Budget

Apr 11, 2017
Tim Kremer, executive director of New York State School Boards Association
NYSSBA

Now that the state budget has been passed, school districts in New York have a better idea on what to expect in state aid, as voters get ready to decide local school budgets on May 16. 

Lawmakers Want Education Forums Rescheduled

Oct 17, 2013

New York Education Commissioner John King Jr.'s office is looking at alternative ways to engage with parents about education reforms after canceling a series of forums following a raucous meeting in Poughkeepsie.

A department spokesman says Wednesday that the office is working with the PTA but has yet to schedule anything.

Tim Kremer - New York State School Boards Association

Jun 26, 2012

New York Governor Andrew Cuomo on Monday signed the teacher evaluation bill into law. Parents will be able to see the evaluations for their own child’s teacher, but the information will not be available to the general public or the media. Tim Kremer , the executive director of the New York State School Boards Association tells WAMC’s Brian Shields that the evaluation system , which the governor has described as evolving, needs to become more valid.