network

The 1976 film, “Network,” written by Paddy Chayefsky and directed by Sidney Lumet won four Academy Awards and granted that and the following generations the indelible expression of utter frustration and mental collapse in Howard Beale's line: “I’m as mad as hell and I'm not going to take this anymore.”

Lee Hall has adapted Chayefsky’s screenplay into a script for the stage which is a hit at Broadway’s Belasco Theatre. Directed by Ivo Van Hove, “Network” stars Bryan Cranston, Tony Goldwyn, Tatiana Maslany, and our guest, Joshua Boone.

Boone’s Broadway debut was in “Holler if Ya Hear Me” in 2014. In our region, he’s been seen at the Williamstown Theatre Festival in three productions over the last two years.

Book Cover - The Human Network

Inequality, social immobility, and political polarization are only a few crucial phenomena driven by the inevitability of social structures. Social structures determine who has power and influence, account for why people fail to assimilate basic facts, and enlarge our understanding of patterns of contagion.

Despite their primary role in shaping our lives, human networks are often overlooked when we try to account for our most important political and economic practices. In "The Human Network: How Your Social Position Determines Your Power, Beliefs and Behaviors." Stanford Professor Matthew Jackson illuminates the complexity of the social networks in which we are (often unwittingly) positioned and aims to facilitate a deeper appreciation of why we are who we are.

Niall Ferguson is one of the world's most renowned historians. He is Senior Fellow at the Hoover Institution, Stanford University, and a Visiting Professor at Tsinghua University, Beijing. His many awards include the Benjamin Franklin Prize for Public Service (2010), the Hayek Prize for Lifetime Achievement (2012) and the Ludwig Erhard Prize for Economic Journalism (2013).

In his new book, "The Square and the Tower: Networks and Power, from the Freemasons to Facebook," Ferguson points out that though the 21st century has been hailed as the Age of Networks, networks have always been with us.

Throughout history, hierarchies housed in high towers have claimed to rule, but often real power has resided in the networks in the town square below. For it is networks that tend to innovate. And it is through networks that revolutionary ideas can contagiously spread. 

The longtime host of Donahue, Phil Donahue established the modern daytime talk show format with his focus on audience participation and hot-button social issues. In 1967 he began hosting The Phil Donahue Show. The show lasted nearly 3-decades and both the host and host won numerous Emmy Awards.

In a WAMC exclusive, Phil Donahue joins us for a special extended interview discussing his long career, politics, the media and even religion.

David Bianculli is a guest host and TV critic on NPR's Fresh Air with Terry Gross. A contributor to the show since its inception, he has been a TV critic since 1975. From 1993 to 2007, Bianculli was a TV critic for the New York Daily News.

Darwin had his theory of evolution, and David Bianculli has his.

Bianculli's theory has to do with the concept of quality television: what it is and, crucially, how it got that way. In tracing the evolutionary history of our progress toward a Platinum Age of Television - our age, the era of The Sopranos and Breaking Bad and Mad Men and The Wire and Homeland and Girls—he focuses on the development of the classic TV genres. In each genre, he selects five key examples of the form, tracing its continuities and its dramatic departures and drawing on exclusive and in-depth interviews with many of the most famed auteurs in television history.

    Brian Stelter was embedded at the national network morning television shows to research his new book, Top of the Morning: Inside the Cutthroat World of Morning TV, when Good Morning America suddenly swept the Today Show’s ratings streak. He is the only reporter who saw how the whole thing went down.