girls

The struggle to desegregate America's schools was a grassroots movement, and young women were its vanguard. In the late 1940s, parents began to file desegregation lawsuits with their daughters, forcing Thurgood Marshall and other civil rights lawyers to take up the issue and bring it to the Supreme Court. After the Brown v. Board of Education ruling, girls far outnumbered boys in volunteering to desegregate formerly all-white schools.

In "A Girl Stands at the Door," historian Rachel Devlin tells the remarkable stories of these desegregation pioneers. She also explains why black girls were seen, and saw themselves, as responsible for the difficult work of reaching across the color line in public schools. 

Rachel Devlin is an associate professor of history at Rutgers University.

Rachel Simmons is the author of "Enough As She Is: How to Help Girls Move Beyond Impossible Standards of Success to Live Healthy, Happy and Fulfilling Lives," and the New York Times bestsellers "Odd Girl Out and "The Curse of the Good Girl."

As an educator, Rachel teaches girls and women skills to build their resilience, amplify their voices, and own their courage so that they live with integrity and health.

WAM Theatre is currently presenting a limited run remount of the company’s very successful 2013 production of Emilie: La Marquise Du Châtelet Defends Her Life Tonight, written by Lauren Gunderson and directed by WAM Artistic Director Kristen van Ginhoven.

The production will run through April 9 at Shakespeare & Company’s Tina Packer Playhouse in Lenox, MA.

  Award-winning journalist and author Nancy Jo Sales is the featured keynote speaker at The Woodstock Writers Festival this year. Her latest book is American Girls: Social Media and the Secret Lives of Teen­agers. She will be in conversation with Carla Goldstein, Omega Institute’s chief external affairs officer and co-founder of the Omega Women’s Leadership Center.

The dominant force in the lives of girls coming of age in America today is social media and Sales captures what it feels like to be a girl in America today. She crisscrossed the country, speaking to more than two hundred girls, ages thirteen to nineteen, and documenting a massive change in the way girls are growing up, a phenomenon that transcends race, geography, and household income.

American Girls provides a disturbing portrait of the end of childhood as we know it and of the inexorable and ubiquitous experience of a new kind of adolescence—one dominated by new social and sexual norms, where a girl’s first crushes and experiences of longing and romance occur in an accelerated electronic environment.

In their number one New York Times best seller Half the Sky, husband-and-wife team Nicholas Kristof and Sheryl WuDunn brought to light struggles faced by women and girls around the globe, and showcased individuals and institutions working to address oppression and expand opportunity.

  In their latest book, now in paperback, A Path Appears  is a sweeping tapestry of people who are making the world a better place. The book is also a guide to the ways that we can do the same—whether with a donation of $5 or $5 mil­lion, with our time, by capitalizing on our skills as individuals, or by using the resources of our businesses.

Kristof and WuDunn, husband and wife, have co-authored three previous books: Half the SkyThunder from the East, and China Wakes. They were awarded a Pulitzer Prize in 1990 for their coverage of China and the Dayton Literary Peace Prize for Lifetime Achievement in 2009.

The Schuyler Center for Analysis and Advocacy will host a breakfast with Nicholas Kristof and Sheryl WuDunn on Thursday October 29, in Albany. 

Listener Essay - When No Girls Were Allowed

Sep 10, 2015

  Jacqueline Sheehan is a New York Times bestselling author from Western Massachusetts. Her new novel, The Center of the World, will be published in January 2016.

  After years of research as a psychologist and consultant for women struggling in the professional world, Dr. Stacey Radin made a groundbreaking realization: it all begins in middle school. Women who become successful leaders learn how to do so in the middle grades—the most formative stage in a girl’s development and self-identification.

Unleashed is a social justice program that empowers adolescent girls to recognize their power, learn to embrace it, and use it effectively by taking a stand against an injustice they are passionate about, and advocating for animal rights and welfare in the process.

We speak with Dr. Radin about Unleashed and her book, Brave Girls: Raising Young Women With Passion And Purpose To Become Powerful Leaders.

HBO Series Films At SUNY New Paltz

Jul 31, 2014
SUNY New Paltz

The State University of New York at New Paltz was turned into a film set for a day. The HBO series Girls chose the campus as a setting to mimic a different university.

“Here we go kids. 3-2-1…action!

It all happened so quickly. Around the beginning of July, SUNY New Paltz officials got the call that Half A Yogurt Productions was interested in filming some scenes for the HBO series Girls. Richard Winters is community and government relations associate for SUNY New Paltz.

SUNY New Paltz Hosts HBO Film Crew For A Day

Jul 30, 2014
WAMC, Allison Dunne

Scenes for an episode of a popular HBO series were filmed on the campus of a SUNY school Tuesday. 

“Here we go kids. 3-2-1…action!"

Scenes for an episode of the HBO series Girls were filmed at a few locations on the campus of the State University of New York at New Paltz. There were no talking parts for the roughly 40 SUNY New Paltz students and staff who were extras. Girls’ creator and star Lena Dunham was in the director’s chair. Regina Heyman is a producer for the show.

HBO Series To Film Scenes At SUNY New Paltz

Jul 29, 2014
popturfdotcom's photostream Flickr

Scenes for an episode of an HBO series will be filmed Tuesday afternoon in the Hudson Valley. 

BIFF - "Fort Tilden"

May 29, 2014

    The narrative feature, Fort Tilden, will screen twice at The Berkshire International Film Festival this weekend. Tomorrow at 9pm at The Triplex in Great Barrington and Saturday at 2pm at The Beacon in Pittsfield.

The film is the full-length feature debut co-written and co-directed by Sarah Violet Bliss and Charles Rodgers.