empathy

Richard Louv’s landmark book, "Last Child in the Woods," inspired an international movement to connect children and nature. Now Louv redefines the future of human-animal coexistence. "Our Wild Calling" explores these powerful and mysterious bonds and how they can transform our mental, physical, and spiritual lives, serve as an antidote to the growing epidemic of human loneliness, and help us tap into the empathy required to preserve life on Earth.

"Our Wild Calling" makes the case for protecting, promoting, and creating a sustainable and shared habitat for all creatures: not out of fear, but out of love. The book looks to point us toward what look for in the age of technology: real connection.

Deborah L. Rhode is the Ernest W. McFarland Professor of Law, and the director of the Center on the Legal Profession at Stanford University. She was the founding president of the International Association of Legal Ethics, the former president of the Association of American Law Schools, and the former founding director of Stanford's Center on Ethics. She is the nation's most frequently cited scholar on legal ethics and the author of 30 books in the fields of professional responsibility, leadership, and gender.

Her new book is "Character: What It Means and Why It Matters."

Having an illness or a disability is stressful. It brings up lots of negative emotions such as fear, anger, sadness, and anxiety. It's easy to get caught up in, or commiserate around, these feelings. But study after study shows that stress is detrimental to the body and mind. Physically, it weakens the immune system and is connected to a host of illnesses. Mentally, stress breeds more stress, making it debilitating and contagious.

For someone living with a disease or disability, stress and negative energy can further compromise health and impact relationships with those most important – families, friends, and caretakers. Because of this, Beyond My Battle focuses on helping people with diseases and disabilities get to the root of their stress so they can better detect, manage, and reduce it.

Beyond My Battle is a not-for-profit organization founded by Martel Catalano and Nell Pritchard in 2016. “Beyond My Battle: Art with Heart & Hope” is an exhibition celebrating the healing power of art for those with illnesses, disabilities, and caretakers. The event will take place on May 9 from 6-9 p.m. at Spring Street Gallery in Saratoga Springs, New York.

Today’s leaders are grappling with the pace and complexity of change, the challenge of supporting healthy collaboration and alignment among teams, and the resulting stress and burnout. The practice of mindful leadership may be one of the most important competencies in business today if leaders are to move beyond fear, anxiety, nagging self-doubt, and the feeling of constant overwhelm.

Marc Lesser has taught his proven seven-step method to leaders at Google, Genentech, SAP, Facebook, and dozens of other Fortune 500 companies for over twenty years and has distilled a lifetime of mindfulness and business experience into the book, "Seven Practices of a Mindful Leader: Lessons from Google and a Zen Monastery Kitchen."

Gerard Stropnicky
Gordon Wendell

In our time, when 280-character insults and snarky memes pass for conversation, is Civic Empathy possible?

Writer, director, activist and instigator, USA Fellow Gerard Stropnicky offers a Field Report on community story applied to community healing and progress as part of Vassar College’s “Engaged Pluralism Initiative Semester of Storytelling.”

On March 27 at 6 p.m. Stropnicky will host the workshop, “Civic Empathy: A Field Report” in the Villard Room on the Vassar campus.

Director and actor Gerard Stropnicky is one of the founding members of the Bloomsburg Theatre Ensemble, one of the oldest resident ensemble theaters in the U.S.

Haemin Sunim is one of the most influential Zen Buddhist teachers and writers in the world. Born in South Korea, he came to the United States to study film, only to find himself pulled into the spiritual life. Educated at UC Berkeley, Harvard, and Princeton, he received formal monastic training in Korea and taught Buddhism at Hampshire College in Amherst, Massachusetts.

His books, "The Things You Can See Only When You Slow Down," which has been published in more than thirty languages, and "Love for Imperfect Things," have sold more than four million copies and are popular as guides not only to meditation but also to overcoming the challenges of everyday life. When not traveling to share his teachings, Haemin Sunim lives in Seoul.

Donna Hicks is an associate at the Weatherhead Center for International Affairs, Harvard University. As a conflict resolution specialist, she has facilitated diplomatic efforts in the Middle East and other high-conflict regions and conducted numerous training seminars worldwide. She is the author of the award-winning book, "Dignity: Its Essential Role in Resolving Conflict."

Her new book is "Leading with Dignity: How to Create a Culture That Brings Out the Best in People."

Gish Jen has spent much of her literary career writing about the experiences of Chinese-Americans. Her latest book, “The Girl at the Baggage Claim: Explaining the East-West Culture Gap,” makes the case for the sociological and cultural patterns that influence many aspects of identity.

The new book, “Modern Loss: Candid Conversation about Grief. Beginners Welcome,” is an examination into navigating grief and resilience in the age of social media, offering comfort and community for coping with the mess of loss through candid original essays from a variety of voices.

At a time when we mourn public figures and national tragedies with hashtags, where intimate posts about loss go viral and we receive automated birthday reminders for dead friends, it’s clear we are navigating new terrain without a road map.

Enter Rebecca Soffer and Gabrielle Birkner. Each having lost parents as young adults, they co-founded Modern Loss, responding to a need to change the dialogue around the messy experience of grief. They look to offer the insights of the Modern Loss community to help us cry, laugh, grieve, identify, and empathize.

Gabriel Kahane's Instagram feed


  Gabriel Kahane’s 8980: Book of Travelers is a new collection of songs inspired by the two-week train trip he took across the United States last November. He left on his un-plugged  journey the day after the 2016 election to meet and converse with dozens of strangers.

Created in collaboration with director Daniel Fish and designer Jim Findlay, 8980: Book of Travelers is a song cycle and solo stage show that will officially premiere at The Brooklyn Academy of Music’s Next Wave Festival later this fall. Tonight, In a kind of sneak-peek, Kahane will take the stage in The Hunter Center at MASS MoCA - where he’s been working on the piece in residency for about two weeks.

In his new book, A Generation of Sociopaths, author Bruce Cannon Gibney looks to show how America was hijacked by Baby Boomers, a generation, he believes, whose reckless self-indulgence degraded the foundations of American prosperity. A former partner in a leading venture capital firm, Gibney examines the policies of the most powerful generation in modern history, saying Boomers enriched themselves at the expense of future generations.

Gibney says acting without empathy, prudence, or respect for facts--acting, in other words, as sociopaths--the Boomers turned American dynamism into stagnation, inequality, and bipartisan fiasco. Gibney argues that younger generations have a window to hold the Boomers accountable and begin restoring America.

Bruce Gibney is a writer and venture capitalist, working at a hedge fund and as a partner at one of Silicon Valley’s leading venture firms, Founders Fund. 

  Adam Johnson is a winner of the Pulitzer Prize for his acclaimed novel about North Korea, The Orphan Master’s Son.

Johnson’s new book - Fortune Smiles – is a collection of stories that gives voice to the perspectives we don’t often hear, while offering a new way of looking at the world. The collection was just named a National Book Award finalist.