Black Lives Matter

A Vermont high school has again raised a Black Lives Matter flag for the beginning of the school year.

Burlington High School, Burlington, Vermont
Pat Bradley/WAMC

Students at a second Vermont high school hope to raise a Black Lives Matter flag.

A Vermont high school has raised a Black Lives Matter flag as part of a series of events on racism.

Ijeoma Oluo is a writer and speaker whose work on race has been featured in The Guardian, New York magazine, xoJane, Jezebel, and more. She is also an editor-at-large at The Establishment, and Seattle magazine named her "one of the most influential people" in Seattle.

In "So You Want to Talk About Race," Oluo offers a contemporary, accessible take on the racial landscape in America, addressing head-on such issues as privilege, police brutality, intersectionality, micro-aggressions, the Black Lives Matter movement, and the "N" word. Oluo answers the questions readers don't dare ask, and explains the concepts that continue to elude everyday Americans.

On July 17, 2014, a black man named Eric Garner died on a sidewalk after a police officer put him in what has been described as an illegal chokehold during an arrest for selling bootleg cigarettes.

In his new book, “I Can't Breathe: A Killing on Bay Street,” journalist Matt Taibbi writes about Garner's life, the police practices that contributed to his death and the rise of the Black Lives Matter movement.

In 2016, the president-elect of the United States openly called for segregation and deportation based on race and religion. Meanwhile, inequalities in education, housing, health care, and the job market continue to prevail, while increased insecurity and fear have led to an epidemic of scapegoating and harassment of people of color.

Yet, recent polls show that only thirty-one percent of white people in the United States believe racism is a major societal problem; at the same time, resistance is strong, as highlighted by indigenous struggles for land and sovereignty and the Movement for Black Lives.

Paul Kivel’s book: "Uprooting Racism" offers a framework around neoliberalism and interpersonal, institutional, and cultural racism, along with stories of resistance and white solidarity. It provides practical tools and advice on how white people can work as allies for racial justice.

Paul Kivel has been a social justice activist, a nationally and internationally recognized anti-racism educator, and an innovative leader in violence prevention for over forty years.

About a week ago, the road sign of a religious congregation in Orange County was spray-painted and flags saying “Refugees Welcome” and “Black Lives Matter” were stolen. Now, the Unitarian Universalist Congregation at Rock Tavern is holding a community forum Sunday called “Valuing Black and Blue Lives in Our Community: A Dialogue.”  WAMC’s Hudson Valley Bureau Chief Allison Dunne spoke with the congregation’s Reverend Chris Antal.

The African American Cultural Center of the Capital Region, Inc., (AACCCR) is proud to present, for the third year in a row, The African American History Month Celebration at the Palace Theatre on Friday, February 24th at 7:00pm.

The annual celebration features the best and brightest talent in the region. This year’s theme is “Where Do We Go From Here?” focusing on participating in grass roots activism for social change. Bervin Harris, co-founder and CEO of the Renaissance Youth Group, will be the keynote speaker.

To give us a preview, we welcome Angela O’Neal – Executive Director of the African American Cultural Center of the Capital Region and Holly Brown – Executive Director of the Palace Theatre. 

City Hall
WAMC composite photo by Dave Lucas

Mirroring last year's Albany State of the City address, last night’s speech by Mayor Kathy Sheehan was interrupted by the din of protestors.

   A serious rift opened between the mayor of Springfield, Massachusetts and the city council in 2016 over the issue of police supervision.  It threatened to pit the city’s executive and legislative branches against each other in court.

In a collection of essays entitled We Gon' Be Alright, acclaimed writer/journalist Jeff Chang (Can’t Stop Won’t Stop, Who We Be) takes an incisive and wide-ranging look at the recent tragedies and widespread protests that have shaken the country.

Through deep reporting with key activists and thinkers, passionately personal writing, and distinguished cultural criticism, We Gon’ Be Alright links #BlackLivesMatter to #OscarsSoWhite, Ferguson to Washington D.C., the Great Migration to resurgent nativism.

Chang explores the rise and fall of the idea of “diversity,” the roots of student protest, changing ideas about Asian Americanness, and the impact of a century of racial separation in housing. He argues that resegregation is the unexamined condition of our time, the undoing of which is key to moving the nation forward to racial justice and cultural equity.

Black Lives Matter Flag flies at student center at the University of Vermont
Akilah Ho-young/Facebook

A Black Lives Matters flag that had been flying at the University of Vermont campus was stolen over the weekend.

Keith Strudler: Summer Basketball

Jul 13, 2016

This week my two boys, age 6 and 8, started summer league outdoor basketball in my town of Beacon. For the uninitiated, summer ball is a particular basketball pleasure, an offseason gathering for those who truly love the sport. Its lacks the structure and perhaps urgency of winter ball, the sport’s natural regular season. It’s outdoors, instructional, and really for people that see basketball as not simply a sport on the rotation, but a year round pursuit.

WAMC

Rallies, marches, and vigils continue in the region following the deaths last week of two black men at the hands of police officers and the lone gunman attack that killed five police officers in Dallas. A Black Lives Matter rally in Springfield, Massachusetts Monday included a U.S. presidential candidate.

Dave Lucas / WAMC

Citizens joined activists and community leaders in Albany chanting enough is enough.

(March 2016) Amherst, Ma. Chief of Police Scott Livingstone joins activists for a photo beneath the " Black Lives Matter" banner that hangs over South Pleasant St.
WAMC

A “Black Lives Matter” banner was hung across a street in downtown Amherst, Massachusetts today in an event organizers said featured an apparent first: the endorsement of a local police chief.

More than 100 people turned out at noon for the dedication of the banner that had been hung earlier in the day across South Pleasant Street at the Amherst Common.

The event, which was held in town hall, featured brief speeches from a renowned UMass professor on social justice education and Amherst Chief of Police Scott Livingstone.

Picture of Bernie Sanders
Bernie 2016

Participants in a Black Lives Matter event Friday at the Vermont Statehouse appeared to support the presidential candidacy of home-state Sen. Bernie Sanders.