Academic Minute | WAMC

Academic Minute

Ellen Forney

So you’re a successful cartoonist and you want to tell the story of your life with bipolar disorder, what do you do? Ellen Forney started drawing. Today on the Best of Our Knowledge, we’ll talk about her very personal graphic memoirs. 

See Ellen Forney's Ted Talk here.

We’ll also hear how to save the world with video games from Jane McGonigal, an author, public speaker and video game designer.

Find Jane McGonigal's Ted Talks here.

A pair of film makers from Florida has explored the history of the Vietnam War from an interesting perspective: surfing.

Today on the Best of Our Knowledge, we follow the journey back to China Beach. We’ll also hear about the Army’s new recruiting campaign.

There is still a feeling that the quality of writing from today’s students is not what it should be. The issue may not be with the students. Next time on The Best of Our Knowledge, we’ll hear why improving the quality of writing may start with the death of the 5 paragraph essay.

We’ll also spend an Academic Minute looking for education potential in your genes.

I’m Bob Barrett…that’s this week on The Best of Our Knowledge.

The world’s coral reefs are magnificent living organisms that are teeming with all forms of sea life. Today on The Best of Our Knowledge, we’ll talk to one of the leading scientists studying the reefs about his new memoir and find out if the future of ocean life is bright.

Beatles Cartoon Art Show

A significant number of colleges are basing their admissions on a student’s grades rather than test scores.

Today on the Best of Our Knowledge, we’ll talk about a new set of answers to the GPA vs test scores question.

We’ll also meet someone who went from art school to the Beatles. Scooby Doo, too. And we’ll spend an academic minute writing an autobiography.

As we head into Black History Month we’ll hear stories about Harriet Tubman, Nat Turner and Dr. King. But there are so many other fascinating stories to tell.

Today on the Best of Our Knowledge, we’ll hear about a remarkable school for young black students in 19th Century New York City.

We’ll also spend an academic minute with a not so well known African American historian.

C-SPAN

For the fourth time in American history, congress has started impeachment proceedings against the president. However, this is not a new or particularly American experience.

Today on the Best of Our Knowledge, we open up history class to look at the past, present and future of impeachment.

We’ll also look at the advantages and the academic future of being bilingual.

PRX

One of the best ways to educate yourself about a community is to read, watch or listen to their local media. But independent local media outlets are becoming scarce.

Today on the Best of Our Knowledge, we present the story of the death, and possible resurrection of the Missoula Independent.

We’ll also talk about medical ethics inside the lab, and spend an Academic Minute with big and small dogs.

One of the things I love about producing this program every week is I get to meet and talk to some really fascinating people who are way smarter than I am. Today on the Best of Our Knowledge, we’ll reintroduce you to traveling school evaluator and the director of the Mississippi Blues Trail.

We’ll also spend an Academic Minute with your brain on music.

Coming to the end of the year is a good time to look back at some our favorite conversations of 2019, including one about the impact of science on the cold war.

We’ll also spend some time reviewing the teacher labor actions from early in the year…and spend an Academic Minute checking time on your body clock.

©Paul Kitagaki Jr.

After the start of World War II, more than 110 thousand Japanese-Americans were rounded up and taken to desolate detention camps. For most of us this is a dark stain on American history. For Paul Kitagaki, it’s personal. For more than a decade he has been tracking down and photographing survivors of the camps and their families. Now, the project has all come together in the stunning new book “Behind Barbed Wire – Searching for Japanese-Americans Incarcerated during World War II”.

Whenever we hear the word fake these days, the mental reflex is to think the word news. But fakes have been a part of society, well pretty much forever. It’s the history of fakes that we’re talking about today with Dr. Lydia Pyne, a writer and historian of science, and currently a visiting researcher at the Institute for Historical Studies at the University of Texas at Austin. Her new book is called “Genuine Fakes – How Phony Things Teach Us About Real Stuff”.

In 2016, Dr. Monique W. Morris examined the experience of black and brown girls in school with her book “Pushout - The Criminalization of Black Girls in Schools”. We spoke to her about the book when it came out. Now she’s back with a further exploration of the experience of young girls of color in school with her follow up called “Sing A Rhythm, Dance A Blues – Education for the Liberation of Black and Brown Girls”.

ted dot com

Video games are everywhere. The industry continues to grow, and the games themselves do serve a purpose.

Today on the Best of Our Knowledge, we’ll meet Jane McGonigal, a game designer who creates games that educate and heal. You can listen to Jane's TED Talks Here and Here.

Bob Barrett

A city as unique as New Orleans is bound to have a colorful history. Next time on The Best of Our Knowledge, we’ll talk about the characters who created this unique American city.

We’ll also spend an Academic Minute reporting on disasters.

I’m Bob Barrett…that’s this week on The Best of Our Knowledge.

If you attend college looking for vocational training, you may end up with a degree, a certificate, and maybe a special badge in empathy. Today on the Best of Our Knowledge, a conversation about digital badges.

We’ll also hear about reports and programs focusing on preventing gun violence in school, and spend an Academic Minute with a mass shooting database.

Advances in technology over the past decade or two have been amazing, rapid, and for many of us, terrifying. Today on the Best of Our Knowledge, we’ll talk about a new book of terrifyingly awesome technology for students.

We’ll also talk about new training for ordering medical tests, learn how mental illness can lead to deportation, and spend an Academic Minute embracing students with disabilities.

Here’s a quick quiz, who was the architect of the New Deal? Easy? You’d think so, however it appears 18% of you think the the answer is AOC, not FDR. Today on The Best of Our Knowledge, the somewhat depressing results of a survey about the state of civics education in the US.

We’ll also talk about the 100th anniversary of a major scientific breakthrough, and spend an Academic Minute building a tavern.

With the start of the new school year, many colleges and universities are putting a new emphasis on student safety. Today on the Best of Our Knowledge, common sense, technology and new laws help promote student safety.

We’ll also talk about the successes of school integration, and spend an Academic Minute improving schools with input from students.

A teacher in Baltimore thinks one solution to his city’s failing schools is tapping an underused asset: the students. Today on the Best of Our Knowledge, a conversation about the Baltimore Algebra Project.

We’ll also spend an Academic Minute with basic math, and how it might delay your college graduation.

Students try lots of different methods to prepare for tests including mindfulness. Today on the Best of Our Knowledge, a look at how test prep is changing.

We’ll also hear how some New York students published a book to help Alzheimer’s research, visit a hospital pathology lab and spend an Academic Minute searching for an autism biomarker.

With all the social and political issues facing the country can universities be a big part of the solution? Today on the Best of Our Knowledge, we’ll look at one road map to a solution that includes a lot of generous thinking.

We’ll also see if you can learn funny with a founding member of The Kid in the Hall, and spend an Academic Minute hearing women’s voices from the past.

American colleges and universities are sometimes called ivory towers, self-contained communities with high minded ideals. But they are still run by people, and people can be pretty awful sometimes. Today on the Best of Our Knowledge, we’ll talk to a pair of researchers who say there are growing cracks in higher ed’s ivory tower.

We’ll also spend an Academic Minute with parity in the potty.

One of the biggest challenges a new doctor faces comes right at the beginning: medical school. Today on the Best of Our Knowledge, we’ll talk about continuing education with a doctor who changed from a traditional to an alternative approach.

We’ll also meet the new leader of a literacy program, grow a summer school garden, and spend an Academic Minute at the farmer’s market.

The longtime president of a northern New York university is calling it quits and looking back on the changes he’s worked through. Today on the Best of Our Knowledge, an exit interview from SUNY Plattsburgh.

For those of you keeping score at home, we’re celebrating a little anniversary today. This is the 1500th edition of The Best of Our Knowledge. That's over 28 years of TBOOK fun! To celebrate, we’re looking back in our archives, and up to the sky. Today on the Best of Our Knowledge, we’ll talk with Dr. Paul Sutter about cosmic voids, a whole lot of nothing in space.

We’ll also spend an Academic Minute exploring hundreds of small planets.

The SAT will soon feature a new score, your adversity index. Today on the Best of Our Knowledge, we’ll talk about what this means for college admissions.

We’ll also learn about school based health centers, talk to some robots with vision and spend an Academic Minute preventing someone from hacking into your DNA.

We hear a lot about young people achieving early success. But is that putting pressure on all the non-prodigies out there. Today on the Best of Our Knowledge, we’ll talk about students who are late bloomers.

We’ll also find some free meals for kids in summer and spend an Academic Minute looking for affordable child care.

I think we can agree that working for social change takes passion, and Bettina Love has that and more. Today on the Best of Our Knowledge, we’ll talk to Dr. Love about abolitionist teaching, both in and out of the classroom.

We’ll also open up a time capsule and spend an Academic Minute with women in politics.

James Minichello AASA for Education Writers Association

One of the president’s most controversial appointments to his cabinet has become one of his longest tenured. Next time on the Best of Our Knowledge, Education Secretary Betsy DeVos speaks.

We’ll also spend an Academic Minute making a decision. I’m Bob Barrett…that’s this week on The Best of Our Knowledge.

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