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New York News

After redistricting impasse in New York, what happens now?

New York state Capitol
Jim Levulis
/
WAMC
New York state Capitol

A New York commission designed to independently draw new statewide congressional and legislative districts based on the 2020 census data succumbed to politics early this month when members divided along party lines and presented two opposing plans to the state Legislature.

The commission was created through a constitutional amendment approved by New York’s voters in 2014. Its aim was to put an end to the state’s notorious past practices of political gerrymandering. But the new rules allow both majority and minority party legislative leaders to pick an equal number of appointees, and the commission ended up with equally numbered Democratic and Republican factions. Each blamed the other for the inability to agree. It will now be up to the Legislature to decide which map, if any, to support.

For analysis, we spoke with Richard Rifkin of the Government Law Center at Albany Law School.

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  • A New York commission designed to independently draw new statewide congressional and legislative districts based on the 2020 census data succumbed to politics Monday when members divided along party lines and presented two opposing plans to the state Legislature.
  • As New York’s Independent Redistricting Commission considers new electoral maps, the leaders of three Capital Region cities gathered this morning, pushing the IRC to keep Albany, Schenectady, and Troy together in the same Congressional district.
  • Democrats in New York have been absorbing the impact of some unexpected losses on election night. They are debating what, if anything, they should do differently next year when several important races, including the contest for governor, occur. Republicans, meanwhile, see new hope for winning statewide offices in 2022.