prodigy

Born in 1819, Clara Schumann was a composer and piano teacher - regarded as one of the most distinguished pianists of the Romantic era.

This weekend The Albany Symphony will celebrate her life and music in The Clara Schumann Festival.

Musicians from the Graduate Program at Bard College Conservatory will perform vocal and instrumental chamber works on Saturday, January 11 at 3 p.m. and Sunday, January 12 at 11 a.m.

Then, on Saturday at 7:30 p.m. and Sunday at 3 p.m., The Albany Symphony will present works by Clara Schumann, Robert Schumann, Johannes Brahms, and a World Premiere by Loren Loiacono. The orchestra will be joined by pianist Harmony Zhu.

These concerts will take place at The Troy Savings Bank Music Hall in Troy, New York and we are joined by Harmony Zhu, Loren Loiacono, and Albany Symphony Music Director and Conductor, David Alan Miller.  

In this week’s Classical Music According to Yehuda, Alan Chartock and Yehuda Hanani conclude their series of conversations about prodigies.

Music - "The Michael Rabin Legacy: Unissued Recordings" - Felix Mendelssohn - Auf Flügeln des Gesanges Op.34 No.2

This is the final Classical Music According to Yehuda segment. We thank Yehuda for his time and expertise. Information about Close Encounters with Music can be found here.

In this week's Classical Music According to Yehuda, Alan Chartock and Yehuda Hanani continue their series of conversations about prodigies, focussing on jazz pianist Joey Alexander and sharing "Evidence,"  a track from his album "Joey. Monk. Live!"

In this week’s Classical Music According to Yehuda, Alan Chartock and Yehuda Hanani continue their series of conversations about prodigies, focussing on Shirley Temple and sharing her performance of "On the Good Ship Lollipop" in the 1934 film "Bright Eyes."

To learn about upcoming events in Yehuda’s Close Encounters with Music series – including this Sunday’s American Premiere of Andre Hajdu’s Masterpiece “Kohelet” – narrated by Sam Waterson – visit cewm.org.

In this week’s Classical Music According to Yehuda, Alan Chartock and Yehuda Hanani continue their series of conversations about prodigies focusing on Erich Wolfgang Korngold.

Alessandro Moreschi (c. 1900)
wikipedia.org

In this week’s Classical Music According to Yehuda, Alan Chartock and Yehuda Hanani begins a series of conversations about prodigies.

In this segment we hear Castrato Alessandro Moreschi perform "Ave Maria."

Bill Barclay returns to Tanglewood for a Concert Theatre Works development project in partnership with the Tanglewood Learning Institute.

The object of his creative attention for "Full Tilt" this summer is Joseph Bologne, the Chevalier de Saint-Georges. Bologne was a decorated military officer, champion swordsman, acclaimed violinist, composer, and conductor, a true Renaissance man of the Classical period and an artist of color in 18th-century France.

Director of Music for Shakespeare’s Globe, Bill Barclay’s original music has been performed across the United States, around the world, for President Obama, the British Royal Family, the Olympic Torch, at the UN, in Buckingham Palace, and in refugee camps in Jordan and Calais. He is the founder of the new label Globe Music.

We live in a society where kids and parents are obsessed with early achievement, from getting perfect scores on SATs to getting into Ivy League colleges to landing an amazing job at Google or Facebook, or even better, creating a startup with the potential to be the next Google or Facebook or Uber.

But there is good news. A lot of us do not explode out of the gates in life. There is a scientific explanation for why so many of us bloom later in life. The executive function of our brains don’t mature until age 25, and even later for some. In fact, our brain’s capabilities peak at different ages. We actually enjoy multiple periods of blooming in our lives.

Rich Karlgaard, publisher of Forbes magazine, write about this in his book "Late Bloomers."

  Over the course of her career, psychologist Joanne Ruthsatz has quietly assembled the largest-ever research sample of child prodigies. Their accomplishments are epic. One could reproduce radio tunes by ear on a toy guitar at two years old. Another was a thirteen-year-old cooking sensation. And what Ruthsatz’s investigation revealed is noth­ing short of astonishing.

Though the prodigies aren’t autistic, many have autistic family members. Each prodigy has an extraordinary memory and a keen eye for detail—well-known but often-overlooked strengths associated with autism.

Each prodigy has an extraordinary memory and a keen eye for detail—well-known but often-overlooked strengths associated with autism. Ruthsatz and her daughter and coauthor, Kim­berly Stephens, now propose a startling possibility: What if the abilities of child prodigies stem from a genetic link with autism?

Their book is The Prodigy's Cousin: The Family Link Between Autism and Extraordinary Talent.