recovery

World-renowned writing teacher Natalie Goldberg’s new memoir, “Let the Whole Thundering World Come Home” shares her experience with cancer grounded in her practice of writing and Zen. It is a reflection on being in love with your life even when life brings illness.

Tommy Orange and book cover for "There There"
Author Photo - Elena Seibert

Tommy Orange’s powerful and urgent Native American voice has exploded onto the landscape of contemporary fiction. His debut novel, “There There,” interweaves the experiences of twelve people who gather in Oakland for a pow wow. It is a multigenerational story about violence, recovery, hope, and loss.

Allison Pataki is the author of the bestselling novels "Sisi," "The Traitor’s Wife," and "The Accidental Empress," as well as the co-author of "Where the Light Falls," with her brother Owen Pataki, and two children’s books.

Her new book marks a departure from her fiction writing. In "Beauty in the Broken Places: A Memoir of Love, Faith, and Resilience," Pataki tells the personal story of her husband Dave's rare and life-threatening stroke and the unfathomable experiences that unfolded around her and her family as he recovered.

Leslie Jamison is the author of the essay collection "The Empathy Exams," a New York Times bestseller, and the novel "The Gin Closet," a finalist for the Los Angeles Times Book Prize. Her work has appeared in the New York Times Magazine, Harper's, and the Oxford American, among others, and she is a columnist for the New York Times Book Review. She teaches at Columbia University.

Leslie Jamison's new book "The Recovering" turns our understanding of the traditional addiction narrative on its head, demonstrating that the story of recovery can be every bit as electrifying as the train wreck itself. Jamison excavates the stories we tell about addiction, both her own and others' -- and examines what we want these stories to do and what happens when they fail us.

Leland Sundries
Sara Feigin

Leland Sundries, a band from New York led by Nick Loss-Eaton, is playing at Ör Gallery and Tavern in Hudson, NY tomorrow night. The New York TImes describes Leland Sundries’ music as “scrappy Americana [that] will get you longing for empty two-lane highways and kudzu-encased back porches.”

Nick Loss-Eaton joins us.

Police and firefighters in Connecticut have recovered a body in the Long Island Sound.

Lucas Willard / WAMC

As law enforcement adapts to the growing heroin and addiction crisis, members of local communities are finding new ways to help those in recovery get back on their feet. One group based in upstate New York is distributing bicycles to help people get to work or to meetings and restore a sense of independence.

Lucas Willard / WAMC

A frank discussion on heroin and opioid addiction was held in Washington County Wedneday night. The forum, moderated by District Attorney Tony Jordan, focused not only on the prevalence of opioid addiction in the Washington, Saratoga, and Warren County regions, but also moving firsthand accounts.

The body of a drowning victim in Lake George was recovered by divers Saturday afternoon.

According to the Register-Star, a body found early Saturday morning in a wooded area in Kinderhook, New York was confirmed by a family member to be Halle Schmidt.

Authorities say a 56-year-old hiker died Friday after falling 100 feet near the Kaaterskill Creek in Greene County. The incident happened near Route 23A near the Hunter-Catskill line.

Kaushik Narasimhan/Flickr

Governor Andrew Cuomo announced Wednesday $10.5 million over five years will go to support six new Recovery Community and Outreach Centers.

  Augusten Burroughs is the author of the autobiographical works Running with Scissors, Dry, Magical Thinking, Possible Side Effects and A Wolf at the Table, all of which were New York Times bestsellers. Running with Scissors remained on the New York Times bestseller list for over two consecutive years and was made into a Golden Globe-nominated film starring Annette Bening.

His only novel, Sellevision, is currently in development as a series for NBC. Dry, Augusten's memoir of his alcoholism and recovery, is being developed by Showtime. In addition, Burroughs is currently creating an original prime-time series for CBS. Augusten's latest book is called Lust & Wonder.

In it, he chronicles the development and demise of the different relationships he's had while living in New York, he examines what it means to be in love, what it means to be in lust, and what it means to be figuring it all out. He will be speaking about and signing the book in our region next Wednesday – April 13th at 7 p.m. at the Northshire Book Store in Saratoga Springs, NY.

OASAS

New York state has released new materials intended for parents, community groups, teachers, and others to help initiate conversation with those struggling with addiction.

  After miraculously surviving a plane crash in Myanmar, Allan Lokos shares what his long and painful recovery process is teaching him about humanity’s ability to survive—and even thrive—in the face of suffering.

In Through the Flames, Allan Lokos tells the terrifying story of being on board a plane on Christmas Day with his wife, Susanna, when it crashed and exploded in flames. Lokos was severely burned in the accident, and in the days and weeks following the crash, Susanna was told by the many doctors who examined Lokos that he would not survive.

A group in Warren and Washington Counties is still trying to establish a center for recovering addicts after negative reaction from neighbors ruled out one prospective location.

Public Domain, Wikimedia Commons

  The fight against heroin has led to a spike in headline-grabbing overdose deaths and police activity. But it also means there are more recovering addicts in need of long-term support. Now, a community group in Warren and Washington Counties is hoping to make a difference. 

    Early studies of the human brain used a simple method: wait for misfortune to strike -- strokes, seizures, infectious diseases, horrendous accidents -- and see how victims coped. In many cases their survival was miraculous, if puzzling. Observers were amazed by the transformations that took place when different parts of the brain were destroyed, altering victims' personalities. Parents suddenly couldn't recognize their own children. Pillars of the community became pathological liars. Some people couldn't speak but could still sing.

In The Tale of the Dueling Neurosurgeons, Sam Kean travels through time with stories of neurological curiosities: phantom limbs, Siamese twin brains, viruses that eat patients' memories, blind people who see through their tongues.

    Lyrysa Smith’s sister, Molly, got a severe brain injury from carbon monoxide poisoning. Her husband died lying next to her in the hotel bed. After nine days in a coma, Molly emerged. But not the Molly that Lyrysa knew.

Her new book, A Normal Life: A Sister’s Odyssey Through Brain Injury, is not a story about recovery. Molly got better, then worse, and then simply different.

Lyrysa tells the story of her sister’s brain injury—its impact on her, their close relationship, and their entire family. She looks to how they were all turned inside out and forever changed by the harrowing complexities of this most damaging and mysterious of injuries.

    Kristen Johnston was 26 when she was cast as John Lithgow's co-star in the hit NBC sitcom, 3rd Rock From the Sun. Suddenly famous, Johnston was unprepared to handle the pressure. She ended up popping lots of pain pills, almost dying in a London hospital when an ulcer in her stomach exploded while she was set to star in a new show on London's West End.

Johnston's book, Guts: The Endless Follies and Tiny Triumphs of a Giant Disaster, is a profane, outrageous, tragic, hilarious and often disturbing portrait of an addict who nearly succumbed to her disease.

Johnston joins us for a candid conversation about her addiction. 

    After a full-throttle brain bleed at the age of twenty-five, Ashok Rajamani, a first-generation Indian American, had to relearn everything: how to eat, how to walk and to speak, even things as basic as his sexual orientation.

WAMC

Vermont Governor Peter Shumlin and state officials were at a farm in Middlesex Wednesday morning to highlight agricultural and farm recovery, and continuing relief efforts, since Tropical Storm Irene hit the state nearly a year ago.

WAMC

Thirteen students from six Vermont colleges and universities are spending their summer working on long-term recovery projects from storm Irene.

The group in charge is the Vermont Campus Compact's Statewide Internships for Vermont Recovery. The program is starting today.

The undergraduate and graduate students will take on a variety of projects that range from working with flood survivors to improving emergency response plans. They will take part in the continuing cleanup effort and assess environmental damage following the storm last August.