psychotherapy

Psychotherapist Teresa Gil joins us this morning discuss her new book: "Women Who Were Sexually Abused Children: Mothering, Resilience, and Protecting the Next Generation." The book is made up of stories of mothers who survived sexual abuse as children reveal the struggles, challenges, and triumphs of this special group of women.

Unraveling the veil of silence and capturing the experiences of mothers who were sexually abused as children, this book offers a first step in both supporting mothers and disrupting the cycle of intergenerational abuse that keeps these mothers isolated and alone in their mothering challenges and successes.

Teresa Gil, PhD, has been a psychotherapist, professor, and trainer for more than 25 years. She has a private practice working with women, children, and families dealing with recovery from child abuse and trauma. She is a full professor and teaches General Psychology, Abnormal Psychology, Child Psychology, and Psychology of Women at Hudson Valley Community College.

Honored for his groundbreaking work in the spiritual, holistic and community-based healing of veterans and Post-traumatic Stress Disorder (PTSD), Dr. Ed Tick has been a psychotherapist for 40 years. He has been specializing in working with veterans since the 1970s.

Later this month the Soldier's Heart Summer Institute Presents: Trauma, Healing and the Human Spirit, June 28 - 30 at the Gideon Putnam in Saratoga Springs, New York. Ed Tick’s keynote in entitled, "Navigating the Apocalypse: From Military to Global Trauma."

Renée Shafransky is a writer and psychotherapist. Her articles and essays have appeared in various publications including the Village Voice, Condé Nast Traveler, and the Southampton Review. She has written screenplays for major motion picture studios and teleplays for HBO and PBS, working with renowned directors such as Harold Ramis. Previously married to actor and writer Spalding Gray, Ms. Shafransky produced the acclaimed film of his monologue, "Swimming to Cambodia," directed by Jonathan Demme.

She joins us to discuss her first novel, a mystery entitled "Tips for Living."

  Stanford psychiatrist Dr. Irvin Yalom has practiced in the area of group psychotherapy for over 50 years, and often writes about his personal experiences with his patients.

In his new book Creatures of a Day: And Other Tales of Psychotherapy, he deals with questions of mortality, from his work with terminally ill patients to his own fear of dying.

He joins us to talk about his career as a psychotherapist and what he's learned from his patients in the process.